Rocket stove

Discussion, tips, tricks and help for running your bus or generator on alternative fuels.

Rocket stove

Postby magic_bus » Sun Jan 13, 2013 1:59 pm

Wondering if anyone has ever tried to build a rocket stove on a school bus?
Being they are able to easily carry loads, it would seem these could be a great alternative for heat.
In case you may not know what a rocket stove is----->
http://www.richsoil.com/rocket-stove-mass-heater.jsp
I bet it could be adapted for mobile use using many scrounged free or almost free materials.
hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.........
-----------------------------------------------------------
1989 Chevrolet C-60 - Carpenter full size body.
8.2 Detroit Diesel Turbo w/ Allison 4 Speed Auto trans
Air Brakes.
User avatar
magic_bus
Mini-Member
Mini-Member
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2013 12:22 pm
Year: 0
Rated Cap.: 0

Re: Rocket stove

Postby travelinwithus » Sun Jan 13, 2013 2:05 pm

Hmmm. is right, that looks interesting.
Our conversion project: http://www.skoolie.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=14451
I just want to be on the road so you can go Travelin' With Us
Image

Member of:
Image
User avatar
travelinwithus
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 272
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:51 pm
Location: Wisconsin
My Bus: Farold
Year: 94
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: International
Engine: DT-408
Rated Cap.: 65

Re: Rocket stove

Postby 100MPG » Sun Jan 13, 2013 5:49 pm

It will heat the entire house or that part where you sit...? pretty amazing he only uses 1/16 the amount of wood he used to use!
100MPG
Skoolie
Skoolie
 
Posts: 102
Joined: Sun Nov 16, 2008 8:48 pm
Location: Long Island NY
Year: 0
Rated Cap.: 0

Re: Rocket stove

Postby crazycal » Sun Jan 13, 2013 9:34 pm

That's cool but what are you going to use as a thermal mass that won't weight 10,000 pounds?
"A fool and his money are soon parted" - Thomas Tusser by way of insouciant

Any typos are the fault of my stupid iPad.

Steve Jobs, may you rot in hell for unleashing OS6!
User avatar
crazycal
Bus Crazy
Bus Crazy
 
Posts: 2031
Joined: Fri Feb 23, 2007 9:24 am
My Bus: ManCave
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Genesis
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/AT545
Rated Cap.: 1

Re: Rocket stove

Postby jlhollowx13 » Tue Jan 29, 2013 9:14 pm

I am very interested in this topic as well. I take it no one on this site has ever tried it? My wife and I manage an RV park and a customer told me about these this year. We live in a VERY cold place in the winters and our wood/coal stove leaves a bit to be desired. We recently purchased a new bus and are highly considering putting one of these in one of them, but are a little skeptical on if it will work or not. seems great, but i wouldnt want to be short on heat in the middle of the night where we live. the other issue is the weight. We bought the second bus with the intention of using it to travel while living in the other full time or at least during the winters, so the bus we put the rocket stove in will not be driven much, if at all. There are also some pretty small and light versions of rocket stoves out there as well, i think its a very customizable. i mean, my wood stove probably weighs 400+ lbs, plus the stone it sits on. I think a smaller rocket stove, made with a 30 gallon drum, maybe some asbestos insulated stove pipe surrounded by fire brick and sand, encased by a wood frame, just to keep it simple, might work in a bus. I need to do more research on the relationship between the drum size/exhaust length/exhaust pipe diameter, but i think it could be done. with the amount of wood we have used this winter we would really like to use something a little more efficient if possible.
jlhollowx13
Mini-Member
Mini-Member
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2012 8:24 pm
Location: Gunnison colorado
Year: 1990
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner MVP
Engine: Cummins 6BT
Rated Cap.: 78

Re: Rocket stove

Postby lornaschinske » Tue Jan 29, 2013 11:30 pm

jlhollowx13 wrote:I think a smaller rocket stove, made with a 30 gallon drum, maybe some asbestos insulated stove pipe surrounded by fire brick and sand, encased by a wood frame, just to keep it simple, might work in a bus...
I would not use asbestos. Just me maybe but....

I think there should be a "lighter" something you could use as thermal mass. There is a Rocket Stove Mass heater on Instructables that uses lightweight vermiculite.
This post is my opinion. It is not intended to influence anyone's judgment nor do I advocate anyone do what I propose.
Fulltime since 2006
The goal of life is living in agreement with nature. Zeno (335BC-264BC)
http://lorndavi.wordpress.com/blog/
Image
User avatar
lornaschinske
Bus Geek
Bus Geek
 
Posts: 3213
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 7:55 am
Location: Roswell, NM
My Bus: Compass Rose
Year: 1986
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: 40 ft All American FE
Engine: 8.2LTA Fuel Pincher DD V8
Rated Cap.: 77

Re: Rocket stove

Postby jlhollowx13 » Mon Feb 18, 2013 1:02 pm

lornaschinske wrote:
jlhollowx13 wrote:I think a smaller rocket stove, made with a 30 gallon drum, maybe some asbestos insulated stove pipe surrounded by fire brick and sand, encased by a wood frame, just to keep it simple, might work in a bus...
I would not use asbestos. Just me maybe but....

I think there should be a "lighter" something you could use as thermal mass. There is a Rocket Stove Mass heater on Instructables that uses lightweight vermiculite.


Sorry, i meant metalbestos, like the insulated wood stove pipe. might be expensive, but seems fairly lightweight and definitely well insulated. probably need some other sort of insulator around that as well though, all surrounded by some kind of wooden box maybe.
jlhollowx13
Mini-Member
Mini-Member
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2012 8:24 pm
Location: Gunnison colorado
Year: 1990
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner MVP
Engine: Cummins 6BT
Rated Cap.: 78

Re: Rocket stove

Postby jlhollowx13 » Sun Apr 28, 2013 9:37 am

red_zone wrote:I registered because I was browsing through and the rocket stove designs caught my eye... and I had some ideas to share.

The beauty of the rocket stove is that it's a totally passive heating system, but such a radiant system requires a large thermal mass to heat up, long runs of exhaust pipe for the exhaust/combustion products/smoke to transfer all of its' heat.

So, to scale down to bus-sized there may have to be two things that need to be cut - mass, especially, and exhaust duct length.
Now, the ones I've seen in all the videos have used vermiculite, clay, lots of brick, etc. Vermiculite is highly insulative, has high heat capacity, and is very light.
What you really need to store all that heat is water. Water has the highest heat capacity of any readily available material, and is the best heat storage available. This is why trombe walls in solar buildings are filled with water. Efficiently transferring the heat from the air to the water is the challenge. Luckily, this has been done; your engine does it in reverse with the radiator.

I think a small rocket stove (the 30 gal drum suggestion?) with a soapstone firebox and a radiator with a pump to circulate water into a thermal storage tank would be the best option for a skoolie. Drain your thermal mass if you're traveling for better fuel efficiency and hill climbing... if you know you're going to camp near a water source. Soapstone has the best heat capacity of most natural stone materials, equal with fire brick, and can be salvaged from broken counter tops - ask for scraps from your local custom kitchen store. This way you have 50-70lb of firebox, insulated with vermiculite for slow heat release. Water tank could be any shape - put it under your bench or under the bus (heavily insulated and with another pump for under floor heat? That'd be neat, and a way to control the heat release back into the bus. Downside? 2 pumps.)

I'd worry about over-heating more in a bus than a house, you can't move but so far away from the stove. If you drain your water and cannot refill, at least the firebox should hold at least as much heat as a cast iron woodstove.


Thanks for that input. I am seriously considering this in our 'house' bus and using our current wood stove in our traveling bus, but making it so the wood stove is removable from the side door when we arent using it/if we are traveling in the summer when it isnt needed and space and weight is more necessary (our stove is small enough to my wife and I and 1 other person can load and unload it in the bus fairly easily). We are currently looking for some land to move onto, and when this occurs our 'house' bus will probably NEVER move again, so weight wont necessarily be an issue anymore (although I would like to make it manageable so that it would be feasible in a traveling bus as well). the setup you describe sounds good, but having 2 pumps kinda kills it for me. We want to and do run on solar, and if possible have no pumps at all (we will probably need at least one for normal running water though). as far as being too hot, this could be a concern for certain regions, but where we live it is one of the coldest places in the continental US, our cast iron wood stove left a little to be desired this past winter and as much heat that is lost in these buses it may not be a bad thing to have a little more heat than needed, after all, a bus has plenty of windows to open.

for us, this past winter was VERY cold, especially at night, even with the fire cranked and we had to get up 3 to 5 times a night to keep the fire going and keep the bus warm enough. on top of it, we went through way too much wood to keep such a small space warm.

My question is this: would pumps REALLY be necessary? I mean, you can use the hot water to really pump itself if it is in a complete circuit where it will lose heat in one spot and gain it in the other, right? thus continually flowing the water and transferring the heat wherever you want it to go. also, how much water would be necessary to make this efficient? any schematics of this setup in a house type setting? maybe it would be best to put the thermal water storage up high, so that the hot water is forced up into it, then from there it can be gravity fed to a hot water tap or back into the heating system? using water was not something I had considered, so this is a new idea for me to explore.
jlhollowx13
Mini-Member
Mini-Member
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2012 8:24 pm
Location: Gunnison colorado
Year: 1990
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner MVP
Engine: Cummins 6BT
Rated Cap.: 78

Re: Rocket stove

Postby lornaschinske » Sun Apr 28, 2013 10:06 am

5 gallon bucket rocket stove

Link is just to get you thinking.
This post is my opinion. It is not intended to influence anyone's judgment nor do I advocate anyone do what I propose.
Fulltime since 2006
The goal of life is living in agreement with nature. Zeno (335BC-264BC)
http://lorndavi.wordpress.com/blog/
Image
User avatar
lornaschinske
Bus Geek
Bus Geek
 
Posts: 3213
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 7:55 am
Location: Roswell, NM
My Bus: Compass Rose
Year: 1986
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: 40 ft All American FE
Engine: 8.2LTA Fuel Pincher DD V8
Rated Cap.: 77

Re: Rocket stove

Postby Duckf00t » Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:56 am

Hello now that summer has come talking heaters sounds moot. When we were on our coast to coast adventure we ran into the same problems getting up many times to load stove and buying wood cost a ton of cash. So looked into those pellet stoves too expensive. After trying to solve the heat troubles got a simple solution. Imagine gold creek montanna 19 below trying go stay warm with a potbelly stove, one of us had to stay awake to feed the stove we took turns. Burned two ricks a day... nightmare. So we survived that, went and got a 100 dollar box stove kit at tractor supply. Took that to a welder had it made airtight to control burn rate. Got a 4x8foot sheet of one inch wire horse fence piece. Made a cage around the stove, leaving cooktop open. Then filled the cage with river rocks as a heatsink. A small 12v fan to circulate heat, works like a charm. The rock heats up retains it when fire dies down and we can get a full nites sleep. The beauty is when we moved take out the rocks reduce weight n roll. Plenty of free rocks to be found if you need them. Cheap solutions are the skoolie way hope this helps
The farther you look into the past the further ahead you'll see- George Washinton
http://duckf00tbus.blogspot.com/
User avatar
Duckf00t
Skoolie
Skoolie
 
Posts: 161
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 10:24 pm
Location: Oklahoma
My Bus: Day-by-Day
Year: 1998
Coachwork: International
Chassis: Amtram
Engine: Navstar 190
Rated Cap.: 77

Re: Rocket stove

Postby bansil » Tue Jun 25, 2013 2:04 pm

Do you have a picture of that setup?

Sounds interesting
Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.
George S. Patton
User avatar
bansil
Bus Geek
Bus Geek
 
Posts: 2619
Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2011 10:11 am
Location: MNT CITY TN
My Bus: La Tortuga
Year: 1997
Coachwork: CROWN at heart
Chassis: Heavy pcs
Engine: 12 valve cummins
Rated Cap.: 2

Re: Rocket stove

Postby Duckf00t » Tue Jun 25, 2013 5:02 pm

Well no we actually settled down in oklahoma. It gets cold here but not bad. Took out the woodstove cage, for passive solar heat. Not as much wood cutting and the bus doesn't move anymore.
The farther you look into the past the further ahead you'll see- George Washinton
http://duckf00tbus.blogspot.com/
User avatar
Duckf00t
Skoolie
Skoolie
 
Posts: 161
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 10:24 pm
Location: Oklahoma
My Bus: Day-by-Day
Year: 1998
Coachwork: International
Chassis: Amtram
Engine: Navstar 190
Rated Cap.: 77


Return to Electric / Propane / Wood Gasification / Other Alternative Fuels

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest