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Old 12-21-2015, 11:14 AM   #81
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I never was very good at math, but with any luck at all, the diesel engine, tranny and rear axle transplants I have made should take me from about 5 mpg to around 25 at a cost of 15 grand.

So...how far do I have to drive just to break even at say $4 bucks a gallon. And...just how far is the Moon anyway?
When I moved back to Houston from Anchorage me and my dad drove it in a pickup truck in a week in May. Here's a fun fact about that road trip: when you make it to Calgary you're halfway there.

If you drove from Downtown Houston to Anchorage to Houston to Anchorage to Houston to Seattle to Houston to Albuquerque to Houston to Galveston to Houston you'd be at about your break even point.
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Old 12-21-2015, 04:24 PM   #82
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If you drove from Downtown Houston to Anchorage to Houston to Anchorage to Houston to Seattle to Houston to Albuquerque to Houston to Galveston to Houston you'd be at about your break even point.

Mmmmm...now that sounds like a fun road trip!

And since I sincerely hope to put at least a quarter million miles on this rig before I die, maybe it will all have been worth it!
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Old 12-21-2015, 05:56 PM   #83
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Hey Tango. At 60 mph, eight hours a day you should be able to reach your 1/4 mil in just a little under a year and a half. Easy peasy and well worth the effort. Its not the drive time that worries me though, its the build time -- better get cracking.

Just having a little fun at your expense. I know a bunch of stuff has gone slow for you, but all of a sudden the whole project will come together and you'll be on the road. Jack
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Old 12-21-2015, 06:31 PM   #84
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but all of a sudden the whole project will come together and you'll be on the road. Jack
Let's hope Jack! I really need get some road time in.
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Old 12-22-2015, 07:37 AM   #85
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Mmmmm...now that sounds like a fun road trip!

And since I sincerely hope to put at least a quarter million miles on this rig before I die, maybe it will all have been worth it!
How much longer do you have left? At 1,000 miles a month that'll take nearly 21 years.

It took me about 12 years to put a quarter million on my truck.
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Old 02-14-2016, 07:43 AM   #86
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Putting aside that it's a really stupid thing to do for all of the safety reasons, you are STEALING fuel mileage from the guy in front.
not true. it helps reduce the drag from that vehicles air flow.
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Old 02-14-2016, 01:49 PM   #87
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I was a fairly rabid bicyclist for many years and learned a lot about aerodynamics. First of all, air is a fluid, just like water, and behaves the same way. Imagine you're walking in a pool of waist deep water. It's obvious that you're pushing a wave in front of you as you push through the water, but what's not so obvious is that you're also sucking water in behind you to fill the hole you just made. Positive pressure in front and negative pressure behind.

This means that you not only have to force your way through the water but you also have to overcome the "suck" behind you. Moving through air works the same way. That's why real aerodynamics (as opposed to styling that looks aerodynamic) involves both ends of the vehicle. A water drop or a bicyclists time trial helmet are perfect examples of good aerodynamics; both have a smooth, rounded front to ease through the air and a pointed tail to gently close the gap behind. Ford wouldn't sell many cars that look like a time trial helmet though.

As far as drafting is concerned, the lead vehicle has "paid" to pass through the air and you, as the drafter, want to get into "the suck" behind it and be pulled along by that negative pressure zone. As many here have claimed, that works quite well for the drafter and doesn't cost the draftee any more. In order for both vehicles to benefit, the rear vehicle would have to move right up to the front vehicles' bumper and stay there, NASCAR style, essentially becoming part of the lead vehicle. Off the track in the real world, I don't think either driver would be very happy with that.

Driving in normal speed, close packed freeway traffic puts you into a forced draft just like a pack of cyclists. All those vehicles whizzing along together make a tunnel through the air which helps everyone.

Another thing cycling taught me is that wind resistance goes up by the square of the speed. That means that to double your speed you have to quadruple your power. Most cyclists can ride along at 10mph, many can hold 20mph, but even world class cyclists can't hold 40mph for any length of time. In general, (assuming no draft is available) freeway driving at minimum speed is just about ideal, fuel mileage-wise.

Vehicle weight costs you when changing speed (accelerating from a stop or changing speed) and when going up hill. Once up to speed on a flat road vehicle weight doesn't matter much. That's why freight trains are so fuel efficient.



Another study I saw showed that steady throttle is better, mileage-wise, than steady speed. Many people use cruise control to get steady speed and that works fine on flat roads, but in hilly areas it's better to let vehicle speed drop on the uphills and rise on the downhills, especially if there is another hill ahead. Obviously, in traffic this wouldn't be very practical.


I've been drafting 18 wheelers and winebagosauruses for decades. I stay about 2 seconds back from the lead vehicle and have never had a problem. In our cars and vans fuel mileage went up by a lot but so far with the bus I'm not seeing the same benefit. Not sure why.
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Old 02-14-2016, 02:04 PM   #88
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...pretty sure you weren't drafting these, hehehe

IMG_0028.JPG
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Old 02-14-2016, 02:53 PM   #89
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There was a guy in our racing club that had a bike sort of like that. He was a big guy and could really roll the flats and the bike put him way up there so he made a BIG hole in the wind. Whenever he brought that bike to our training sessions we all fought to be the one right behind him on the road.
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Old 02-14-2016, 09:12 PM   #90
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I drove a bus from MI to WA one time.

As I was going across IA, NE, and WY I would try to draft as much as possible.

The bus had a top speed of 67 MPH and would slow down on just about any sort of grade.

Drafting behind big trucks I was able to maintain 65 MPH without having to be at wide open throttle. But as soon as a grade came up I couldn't maintain the truck's speed and dropped out of draft position.

I know it made a difference in fuel use but I didn't do enough drafting over enough miles to know for sure what the difference in fuel use was.

What I did know is many miles at less than full throttle was a lot easier on the ears.
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