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Old 05-03-2016, 11:05 PM   #11
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
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Year: 1987
Engine: GMC
Hey everyone---- the brakeline fix went really well,

we tore out the old line as far as it had been rusted, and after taking our measurements from it, we bought lengths of copper nickel brake line that were so easy to bend the re-installation went really fast.

We bled the old brake fluid during the installation and later replaced it.

This was all in the rear tires of the bus.

We just did our best to mimic the old line, the copper nickel line was so easy to work with it felt as easy as putting together lego.
~~~~~~~
One of the short rubber tubes that we took out was completely clogged up. I imagine this is because the bus had been sitting for so long. We realized that the front brake on the driver's side was also not working.... and I think it is because this soft tube is all gunked up too---

anyways we didn't fix it right away and after taking it on the highway now that brake has seized -- we smelled it burning and the wheel rotor was very hot and scuffed shiny.

We intend to replace the brake lines to the front tires with the copper nickel line and new rubber tube since it went so well for the back!

(yes we used flare fittings)

Has anyone had experience fixing a brake caliper that had seized?
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Old 05-03-2016, 11:50 PM   #12
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If it is the caliper that seized, replace it. Try undoing the line or the bleeder at the caliper, if you get fluid out and the caliper releases, you may have a collapsed hose. I have seen hoses cause this problem before.
You have come this far, it might be a good idea to change all your hoses and the front calipers. Piece of mind and all that...
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Old 05-04-2016, 09:16 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SharkBus View Post
Hey everyone---- the brakeline fix went really well,

we tore out the old line as far as it had been rusted, and after taking our measurements from it, we bought lengths of copper nickel brake line that were so easy to bend the re-installation went really fast.

We bled the old brake fluid during the installation and later replaced it.

This was all in the rear tires of the bus.

We just did our best to mimic the old line, the copper nickel line was so easy to work with it felt as easy as putting together lego.
~~~~~~~
One of the short rubber tubes that we took out was completely clogged up. I imagine this is because the bus had been sitting for so long. We realized that the front brake on the driver's side was also not working.... and I think it is because this soft tube is all gunked up too---

anyways we didn't fix it right away and after taking it on the highway now that brake has seized -- we smelled it burning and the wheel rotor was very hot and scuffed shiny.

We intend to replace the brake lines to the front tires with the copper nickel line and new rubber tube since it went so well for the back!

(yes we used flare fittings)

Has anyone had experience fixing a brake caliper that had seized?

that was STUPID, you could have killed someone, DO NOT half ass brakes for everyones sake

Please take pictures of what you did for the rear brakes so we can help you sort this out

just replace the calipers, taking them apart,honing them and replacing o-rings is not a viable option nowadays

since you super heated the rotor you probably messed up the tempering of the metal and it will wear very quickly now

We will all help you do safe things, for our buses brakes are the most important thing
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Old 05-04-2016, 12:18 PM   #14
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Hi Bansil, thanks for your concern... but I'm not sure if you read the post fully.

We managed to do a really excellent job on the rear brakes and there are no issues there.

The front brake on the driver's side didn't seem to be working as well as the other three once we took it on the road to test it.

We concluded that we would change the front brakes for new to be extra safe, but the front brake seized during a drive for parts.

Any other advice on how to replace the calipers on the front driver's side wheel would be super appreciated
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Old 05-04-2016, 12:19 PM   #15
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A point of clarification.

Brake lines are double flared with a special tool. Most people who would take on a job like this would know about DF but not everyone.

After dealing with a line here and a line there on vehicles over the years I look really hard at the rest of the lines when one fails.
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Old 05-04-2016, 12:32 PM   #16
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That's a good point, treenail --

The lengths of brake line that we used for the job were pre-flared to manufacturer standards so being new to this kind of mechanical fix, it gave us peace of mind.

I would recommend pre-flared lengths of copper nickel brake line for those who may be otherwise intimidated by a brake line fix, as it is easy to work with and also has a great lifespan as it is extremely resistant to rust.

In Canada we found it at Parts Source.
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Old 05-04-2016, 12:52 PM   #17
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Yes definately make sure the rest of your brake lines are good. ALot of the times u replace one and it will blow the next weakest one. Ive never seen pre-flared brakelines that would be long enough for a bus. if your replacing the one to the back wheels
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Old 05-04-2016, 01:04 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SharkBus View Post
Hi Bansil, thanks for your concern... but I'm not sure if you read the post fully.
"We realized that the front brake on the driver's side was also not working.... and I think it is because this soft tube is all gunked up too---anyways we didn't fix it right away and after taking it on the highway now that brake has seized"

This above is what I read, hence my response

Quote:
Originally Posted by SharkBus View Post
Any other advice on how to replace the calipers on the front driver's side wheel would be super appreciated
The front calipers will come off with a few bolts taken out
go to Vatozone, Napa whatever is your choice get

1) get calipers 1 right and 1 left(when replacing them make sure the bleed screw is on top the reason for right and left) loaded with pads ~$82 each

2) get 2 new banjo bolts for them ~$5 ea

3) make sure you have new copper washers for the banjo fitting ~15 set

4) get 2 rubber front brake lines ~30 ea (these can/will collapse internally and may look new on outside but bad inside, what happens you apply brakes and hose collapses from vacuum when pedal releases=instant locked or dragging brakes)

5)front rotors ~135 ea (you may be able to have yours turned for $25 each, problem is the one that was abused when caliper was locked I wouldn't take a chance with it,being soft, or hard glazed or even internally cracked from the extreme heat it endeared)

so for about ~$550 you can have all new brakes that should last 75k miles

I would replace all of this at same time, if rear rubber hoses and the 1 front were bad the other front is also bad, since you hand one front caliper lock up, the other is probably bad, this is just my take on it, your mileage may vary
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Old 05-04-2016, 01:07 PM   #19
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to add you may have two flat springs holding those calipers on like some old fords instead of bolts


Banjo bolt and fitting


NEVER REUSE THESE COPPER WASHERS (unless you are trapped in the Sahara running out of water, OR you are about to be eaten by a Lava monster)



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Old 05-04-2016, 01:20 PM   #20
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Thanks so much for the thorough information, Bansil! It's really helpful--- look forward to doing this fix and posting how it goes!
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