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Old 04-02-2016, 01:59 PM   #1
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Brake line fix

We started running our GMC 6000 after fixing a problem with the ignition----- the engine runs beautifully, the only problem is that the brake line on the passenger side rusted and busted.

Has anyone replaced brake lines on their bus before? We are thinking of getting a roll of tubing that we can bend ourselves and then hooking it up with rubber fittings.
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Old 04-02-2016, 02:47 PM   #2
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Brake line doesn't come in rolls and what kind of rubber fittings are you talking about? You need a tubing bender and a flaring tool.
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Old 04-02-2016, 03:07 PM   #3
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yep. What Cal said.
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Old 04-02-2016, 03:09 PM   #4
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If you can, remove the old brake line and take it to an automotive store so you get the correct length, hopefully preflared. Don't make any more bends than absolutely necessary.
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Old 04-03-2016, 03:55 PM   #5
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Do what Robin97396 said. Don't ever use rubber fittings on brake lines. They will not hold the pressure and you will lose your brakes.
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Old 04-03-2016, 04:51 PM   #6
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Taking your old lines into a shop to get some new ones is a very good idea. That way you not only get the right length and diameter but the correct threads on the nuts on the ends.

If you do decide to make up your own and make flares on the end, make sure you put the flare nuts on the line facing the correct direction before you make the flare.

Don't ask me why that is a good idea!
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Old 04-03-2016, 04:52 PM   #7
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You need to follow a lot of the reccomendation's above including the flaring tool and fittings. The manufacterer's put them together like that for a reason?
There is a short length of rubber hose/tubing at each wheel well brake attachment to provide flexibility in the steel line while going down the road.
At a minimum use the same pressure rated tubing as what you are trying to replace.
You can get 10' length of brake line tubing but you need the proper tools to work it and the correct fittings to fit your flexible lines on both ends (from steel pipe flared to flexible tubing flared to tubing pipe end (male/female) to brake caliper flare connection (male/female) standard pipe thread to flare pipe thread have different OD (outside pipe diameter) which has kicked my butt many a time! for example a 1/4" OD (outer diameter) fitting does not work with a 1/4" ID (inner diameter).
This applies to automotive tubing of any kind and refrigeration tubing for any HVAC units. For your brakes I can only suggest
Carry what you want with you and if they can't match it?
Then your looking in the wrong place?
Most auto stores can't deal with medium duty equipment/buses so you should,be talking to heavy/medium duty truck suppliers?
Talk to the ones that know your equipment (local bus barn for me ) haven't been there
Since I bought it but the want to see there 223/jolly roger when I am ready.
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Old 04-04-2016, 12:16 AM   #8
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These days you just buy brake lines the correct length at the store.

It is possible to flare them yourself, but modern brake lines tend to split when you try to flare them. If you've got time and patience to practice flaring and bending brake lines, great, cause you can get pretty good at it with a little practice.
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Old 05-03-2016, 05:21 PM   #9
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You can definitely buy brake lines in rolls 25 or 50 ft usually. Buy the Good Ni-Cop lines they don't corrode as easy. Also use flare fittings . do not use compression fittings on brake lines.
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Old 05-03-2016, 07:38 PM   #10
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The reason break lines come in so many different lengths pre-flarred, is because this modern metal doesn't take well to being stretched with a flaring tool. With practice you can get it right, but how much does it cost to practice?
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