Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-07-2007, 11:24 AM   #11
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Plymouth MA
Posts: 186
My post was pointed at the way I'm doing things. If you have a different method, fine, I just hope you don't have problems during the 'smoke test' (i.e. energizing the circuit).

If folks want to use solid NM, fine. I'm sure RV manufacturers use the stuff based on expense of materials, ease of use (meaning cheaper labor), ease of connection to outlets, switches, etc.; after all, it's all about the bottom line and what they can get away with.

With copper having more than DOUBLED in price in the last year, this will be, again, driven by economics.

I prefer using plastic conduit, followed by EMT, and save BX for exposed places, or where it has to be moved on occasion, say an appliance that is wired in and I want more protection from pinching etc. during re-installation.

Typed in using 100% recycled electrons
__________________
The tool storage is nice, but where do I put the bed?
Ryan Grimm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2007, 12:58 PM   #12
Almost There
 
nyrockingchairs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Western New York
Posts: 98
Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

The numbering conventions, not sure how a 12/3 extension cord equates to a 12/2 NM but the 12 is the wire guage size and the /3 is the number of insulated conductors, usually not including the ground wire. So maybe the 12/3 indicates 3 insulated conductors with 1 used as the GND, and the 12/2 NM is a 2-conductor with a ground wire.

When you buy wire in the store it is almost always of the convention 12/2 indicates 2 insulated conductors and then you get it with either with or without a GND. 12/3 is usually used for when you want the multiple switch control over a single circuit or are running outlets and the top halves are switch controlled while the other half is always on, it has a multiple usage life...
__________________
1988 Chevrolet S6000 8.2L Detroit Diesel
nyrockingchairs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2007, 01:12 PM   #13
Bus Geek
 
the_experience03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Saint James, MN
Posts: 2,669
Send a message via MSN to the_experience03 Send a message via Yahoo to the_experience03
Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

What I can't for the life of me remember is if the bulk SO is numbered like the extension cords where 12/3 means 12 gauge and two conductors plus a ground or if it is named like the NM where 12/2 (w/ grnd) would mean two conductors and a ground. I usually just cheat and look at the cut end of the wire if all else fails.

I don't want to get into the stranded versus solid debate again, but for those of you running solid are you running just regular romex (NM) or are you getting the direct bury, UV resistant UF stuff?

After a year and a half my cut up neon extension cords are still working GREAT. I haven't had a single electrical problem unless you want to count one fluorescent fixture in the bathroom falling down from a stripped screw and occasionally having to tighten a bulb back up.
__________________
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3024/...09f20d39_m.jpg
Skooling it...one state at a time...
the_experience03 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2007, 08:29 PM   #14
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Plymouth MA
Posts: 186
Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

OK, here's what I've done over the last two years:

I've parted out five RVs of one sort or another......two 5th-wheels (one top-of-the line), two travel trailers (both lower end), and an older Dodge-powered RV.
The high-end 5th-wheel and the Dodge RV both had STRANDED copper wiring for the 120VAC and 12VDC systems.
The lower end 5th-wheel and both travel trailers had stranded copper for the 12VDC, and solid 12-2 and/or 14-2 NM for the 120VAC.
Seems to me that economics definitely had a hand in the wiring choice!

I checked the systems as best I could by energizing them with the appropriate voltage. I found NO problems with the stranded wiring, and two faults (shorts/popping breakers) with the low-end 5th-wheel. One of the cheapo travel trailers had a no-power fault to the fridge. I did NOT bother tracing down the faults, as I was converting the wire to scrap for the $$$.

And NO, I will NOT publish the names of the vehicles, I don't need the hassles from manufacturers.

I WILL continue to say that you can choose what to use for wiring. Me? I'm going to watch my wire gauges for proper sizing, and wire it up like I said.

As an aside, I recall an RV that a friend rented a few years ago, virtually new.......he was having trouble with a circuit for the kitchen popping the breaker.....it wouldn't reset, and I tried swapping out a breaker from another circuit; same problem, so it wasn't the breaker.
The 120VAC wiring in that vehicle was all 12-2 NM to my recollection....solid wire.

Your mileage may vary. Please use ONLY 100% recycled electrons at all times for best efficiency!
__________________
The tool storage is nice, but where do I put the bed?
Ryan Grimm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2007, 12:22 PM   #15
Almost There
 
Xtevan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 89
Year: 1990
Coachwork: BLUEBIRD
Chassis: TC2000
Engine: Cummins 5.9
Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

Extreme recycling!!



Don't try this at home or on your bus

Xtevan
__________________
Xtevan
Bus Project Pictures
http://picasaweb.google.com/XtevanofthePlaya
Xtevan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2007, 08:31 AM   #16
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Plymouth MA
Posts: 186
Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

Love that picture! What kind of wire is it? It kinda looks like phone wire in relation to the staples and "wiring box", but I can't be sure.

Yet another excellent example of a terrible example....read that again and you'll see what I mean!

IF it's just a phone connection box, it's just fine.
If it's a 12VDC or worse, 120VAC connection, I don't want to see the video of it burning on YouTube....OK?

Gotta admire that backwoods inventiveness, though...............
__________________
The tool storage is nice, but where do I put the bed?
Ryan Grimm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2007, 09:09 AM   #17
Almost There
 
Xtevan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 89
Year: 1990
Coachwork: BLUEBIRD
Chassis: TC2000
Engine: Cummins 5.9
Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

I can across the picture with a bunch of Home inspection nightmare photos on the web. It reminded me of the summer I cleaned air conditioner coils for a property management company in College Station, Texas. On a hazy monday morning I could envision a few of my co workers using this fix after seeing some of their other 'work'.

Xtevan
__________________
Xtevan
Bus Project Pictures
http://picasaweb.google.com/XtevanofthePlaya
Xtevan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2007, 09:49 PM   #18
Bus Geek
 
the_experience03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Saint James, MN
Posts: 2,669
Send a message via MSN to the_experience03 Send a message via Yahoo to the_experience03
Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

Neon extension cord wiring.
__________________
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3024/...09f20d39_m.jpg
Skooling it...one state at a time...
the_experience03 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2007, 01:30 PM   #19
Bus Crazy
 
timbuk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: vancouver island bc
Posts: 1,028
Year: 1965
Coachwork: thomas
Chassis: chevy
Engine: 350
Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

when i bought my bus the shore line cable had been removed from the junction box in the shoreline cable storage area i wired in a 12 guage stranded cable to the connection box and hooked the ground to the chassis all was working well untill it rained and the gfci in the house began to trip where thu bus was plugged in Does the ground need to be hooked up to the bus or should it float at this point? thanks in advance
timbuk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2009, 11:39 AM   #20
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 39
Year: 1993
Coachwork: genesis
Chassis: international harvester
Engine: DT466
Rated Cap: 84
Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

I was wondering what to use for the electrical transfer switch, 1st option use a rv automatic transfer switch or, option 2 could a person use a generator transfer switch, also what do most people use for circuit breaker panels to control loads. I'm needing to know starting work on our 1993 genesis DT466, MT643 84 pax FC bus . Thank you in advance.
dieselman69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bus Electrical Systems - DC Les Lampman Conversion Tutorials and How-to's 64 12-06-2016 10:51 PM
Leveling systems lornaschinske Conversion General Discussions 0 08-04-2012 11:42 AM
Electrical Systems noahyay Conversion General Discussions 11 07-29-2005 06:43 AM
Sewer Systems Steve Conversion Tutorials and How-to's 0 06-16-2004 01:31 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.