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Old 04-10-2009, 09:27 PM   #21
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Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

The bus shell is connected to the ground wire, and grounded by the AC supply circuit. The white neutral circuit wire is not connected to the bus shell, its ground bonding is at the supply.
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Old 06-22-2010, 12:31 AM   #22
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Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

Only bond the ground to neutral at the point of origin of the power. If the power comes from dockside (campground) then it is bonded there and you don't bond it. If it comes from your generator, it should be bonded inside the generator and you don't bond past the generator. It's the same thing if you add a sub panel in your house--the main panel in the house is bonded--nothing past the main panel is bonded.

I used solid wire everywhere. This is where the theory and the practice diverge. There is barely any movement in a vehicle on the wiring. Immeasurable if you have it secured every 6". You need heat to deteriorate the wire--you won't get it. It won't work loose of the connections. I got rid of a '71 Winnebago 2 or 3 years ago and everything worked great. It was solid wire.
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Old 02-24-2011, 11:31 PM   #23
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Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

From a Professional Coach Converter http://users.cwnet.com/~thall/fredhobe.htm
Quote:
Way to save money on wiring

I buy 100 foot extension cord when they're on sale number, 12/3 conductor wire size. I can get them for as little as $15.00 and they come in different colors. I get several different colors and use yellow for air conditioners, orange for lights, black for wall plugs (120 volt) and green for 12 volt. They are UL approved and very flexible. You need to tin the ends when you hook them up to your main and on other connections use High lugs. Use an indent squeezer to make good connections. You can buy 100 ft. cords with plugs on them cheaper than you can buy the wire by the foot. I use about 500 ft. of wire on a coach.


This shows how wires are run in the roof. Run them where they will come down the wall to the fuse panel.
We have a lot of long heavy extension cords left from our remodeling days. We saved them along with all the stranded wire we salvaged from the Eagle. guess what we will be using.
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Old 02-27-2011, 02:20 PM   #24
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Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

i have worked as an Commercial Electrician for a few years and in that time I wired a lot of Transformers, and due to the vibration of them, we had to use stranded wire, and the few that ive seen that were wired with BX ( Solid wire wrapped in flexible steel armor) we were back in a few months to replace the solid wire with stranded, and now i am an Aircraft Mechanic, and i see large aircraft having both 24vdc and 110vac wired into them, and the FAR's (Federal rules and regulations) strictly prohibit the use of solid wire in aircraft, (with a lot of research to back it up) due to work hardening and breakage. so in my humble opinion, the stranded is well worth the few extra pennies. and yes the travel trailer companies who build their trailers for the majority of owners that will use them 1 to 3 weeks a year, the solid works ok, and i have seen people who use them alot more than that have problems like plugs that dont work, or switches that audibly buzz for a few seconds when you turn on a light, so take my thoughts and ramblings with a grain of salt, and maby a shot of tequila, and enjoy
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Old 03-01-2011, 11:46 AM   #25
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Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlleyCat67
... would 15A be enough to run a rooftop A/C unit (would be the only thing on that circuit)?
NO
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Old 04-27-2011, 09:47 AM   #26
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Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

Make certain that lines running AC units are sized for PEAK LOADS, in other words the surge anticipated when the compressor kicks in. Having a 15A circuit is not a good idea....a MINIMUM 20A wiring and breaker is in order.
Once upon a time, my mother decided to plug in a large and ancient AC unit with a 15A zip cord extension, I was in the basement looking for the 'real' extension cord.
Before I could get upstairs, the AC started up, and the cord MELTED, leaving molten copper embedded in the wood trim and the carpeting!
I'M NOT KIDDING. I was 14 when this happened.
Needless to say, she changed her mind about doing that again.

I sincerely hope you keep in mind that electrical loads are a potentially dangerous thing.
REMEMBER, 50% of ALL electricians in the 1920's died of electrocution. House fires were a LOT more common, and one of the scariest things I've seen were additions to post & tube wiring in old houses, with no idea of what is the hot side, what is neutral, and forget having a ground!
Electrical Code is there for good reason, based on the number of fatal and tragic fires that have occurred in the past...learn from others' mistakes, instead of making new ones identical to the old ones.

I firmly believe that using solid wire is based strictly on two criteria:
#1) EXPENSE. Solid wire is cheaper, and electrical connections/boxes/outlets are cheaper for it.
#2) Useful Life. Most RVs have very little use over a lifetime...I see MANY, MANY RVs that have less than 40K miles on them in scrapyards, and they are there due to shoddy workmanship/leaks/structural problems.

We in Skoolies have a great foundation in bus construction, and I believe I will give my best shot at surviving long-term in a vehicle set up my own way.
I have YET to see ANY vehicle that uses solid wire for it's own factory wiring; it's all stranded.
Since that has worked for about 100 years now, I'll keep on with that idea.
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Old 04-25-2012, 09:12 PM   #27
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Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

Just for fun and from the never say never file--- While repairing a late model Ford Focus that had sustained flood damage I discovered that the standard stranded copper automotive wire had been substituted with solid aluminum "wire" in the area adjacent to the rear wheel wells. I suppose that the manufacturer managed to cut a bit of weight that way. I have no idea what the normal life expectancy is for this "stuff" but I will continue to use stranded copper wire--mostly because I am an old stick in the mud and I've yet to see a case made for solid Al. wire.
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Old 05-20-2012, 12:21 AM   #28
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Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

We need some help.
We have a 1991 Thomas School bus, diesel.
It ran when we bought it and drove it the 50 miles to our house. We have ran it several times in the past 3 months while parked in our driveway during our conversion.
My husband desperately needs a wiring diagram as he has somehow inadvertently done something to the wiring and now the bus will not start.
We are attempting to wire up a 12volt water pump to the existing electrical system.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks


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Old 06-27-2012, 11:42 AM   #29
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Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

Remember, any appliance or accessory you add needs it's own fuse and shutoff switch.
I have seen many RVs with an additional shutoff switch in the bedroom, for the pump...the pumps sometimes ''start up" in the middle of the night if pressure in the water line drops....annoying at best.
This adds complexity to the wiring, not to mention voltage drops to the pump due to length of added wire for this feature.

I hope the debate of stranded-vs-solid wire continues. I still believe best practice is to use stranded for long-term safety and viability.

Let the thread know if any of you experience any problems or solutions of problems.

Thanks!
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Old 06-28-2012, 11:25 AM   #30
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Re: How To: Bus Electrical Systems - AC

first of all the road fam needs to have separate house batteries for the water pump, etc and not run them off the coach batteries if ya want the thing always to start.
if the bus won't start and you have done something to the wiring, go back and hook up what you did. school busses like my thomas wont start if they have the door system wiring disconnected, and the buzzer will always sound if parts of it is disconnected improperly. so hook the wires up as they were originally. other people on here have had the same problem.

about aluminum wiring.. i have found several newer cars that have aluminum wiring in various places..so that i suppose is the future for automotive wiring... i am sure its a bit cheaper when bought in huge rolls...

i always use stranded wire for rv's except when using the 110v solid rv wire that is out there...
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