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Old 02-22-2016, 11:05 AM   #1
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DC and AC questions...

might have allready been asked, but I have a couple quick questions

DC:
I am planning on wiring a 12v deep cycle battery such that it is connected in parrallell with the main bus batteries a few seconds after turning the bus on (and disconected when bus is off). I want to do this with a solenoid and delay timer as shown in the diagram, do yall see any issues with directly connecting the batteries like this?



AC:
I have done some funky stuff in an attempt to be able to switch from the inverter as a power source to shore power as a power source. I am really trying to keep things cheap as im sure yall can tell.. I know it looks dumb having an invertor connected to a converter, but if i can keep the converter from actually converting when the inverter is the source, I think its the simplest option.. Im wondering, if I were to break that circuit of the 12v's going to battery, would there still be a draw from the converter? I feel like there would not be but maybe there are some sort of losses in the transformer or something like that. maybe I could figure out a way to switch it off before it goes to the transformer..?

thanks
Leo
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Old 02-22-2016, 11:56 AM   #2
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Picture isn't displaying for me.

Why the delay circuit? The relay-type battery isolators I've seen don't use them.

Here's a good thread on wiring:

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f13/el...ing-13059.html
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Old 02-22-2016, 01:09 PM   #3
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the picture shows for me but maybe this link will work for you

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1yu...5-TUccpmH40NJg
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Old 02-22-2016, 02:14 PM   #4
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Me either...don't see anything.
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Old 02-22-2016, 02:46 PM   #5
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ok.. attempt # 6, typed up in a word document first lol

so the converter has a 30a plug as the input and 4 fused 120vac circuits and 1 12vdc circuit as the output.

I don’t want to be able to switch between inverter and shore power at the source of the 120vac, that way I can easily switch between shore power and battery power while using all the same outlets, etc.

I want to see if I could wire the inverter to the converter in order to use the 4 120vac fused circuits for all my ac power needs… hopefully bypassing the actual converter someway or the other

Sorry the pic wont work.. maybe because I am a new user… here is a link that will hopefully work:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1yu...5-TUccpmH40NJg

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Old 02-22-2016, 04:14 PM   #6
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A CONverter converts 120v AC from shore power into 12v DC and often incorporates a battery charger. Your shore power/generator supply circuit attaches to the converter input (usually through the breaker box). The converter outputs go to your battery or DC circuits and the charger outputs go to the battery bank.

An INverter converts 12v DC from the batteries into 120v AC. The inverter input attaches to the battery bank with a fat wire (basically a battery cable) and should be installed very close to the batteries to keep voltage drop to a minimum. The Inverter outputs typically go to a few isolated AC outlets while the remainder of the AC circuits are powered from shore power through the breaker panel. Unless you have some way to switch your breaker box AC input between shore power and inverter power, keep your inverter and shore power circuits separate.

One easy (but not cheap) way to simplify this mess is to use a standby inverter which attaches to both the battery bank and shore power and automatically switches your AC circuits between the two. No need to have separate AC circuits. The standbys typically include a converter/charger too.

In your schematic, the converter (when attached to the inverter) is charging the batteries while the inverter drains the batteries to power the converter.
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Old 02-22-2016, 04:32 PM   #7
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right, I think your not quite getting my question but I really appreciate the response.

Im going to check out the details of how my power converter is wired when I get home tonight and see if its possible to switch the converter off while still utilizing the bank of 120v circuits on the power inverter!

(also, I have quite an old converter, not 100% sure how it works or how it compares to the standard.. there is only one positve dc wire and one negative dc wire coming out.. i need to check the voltage across them)
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Old 02-22-2016, 04:51 PM   #8
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If I read your post correctly, what you're proposing is a perpetual motion machine. The Inverter takes 12VDC and turns it, hopefully, into 120VAC. Then, you want the converter to charge the batteries with the big motor.

Won't work unless you actually get out and switch them over.
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Old 02-22-2016, 05:05 PM   #9
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No no no... thats not what im saying but i def see how yall are thinking this..

i am trying to switch between shore power and the inverter AT THE SOURCE (so all outlets can be powered by either) - this is the MAIN goal (and i wana achieve it without spending $$ cus i dont have $$)

the problem is the only way I have to switch the circuits at the source, which means it has to go through the converter just about no matter what, obviously i dont want to invert DC from the battery to AC in the convert it back to DC. what I do want to do is invert DC to AC then bypass the converter to the same 120vac circuits that the converter has running out of it when it is plugged into the shore. ie NOT convert to DC again.. just bypass converter to its AC circuits - this is the part I dont know how to do.

if I cant figure out a way to do this i will likely opt to having seperate circuits for shore and inverter like roach said .. i just want to avoid that if its possible!
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Old 02-22-2016, 05:12 PM   #10
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It can be done, but it's called a cross-over circuit breaker. For example, you have solar panels that bring in DC to a battery bank at your house. But, you're not using the battery bank while the local utility company supplies the AC you desperately need in the house. But when the utility company fails to perform as advertised, you want DC to turn into AC with very little intervention on your part. Correct?
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