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Old 02-04-2016, 11:18 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Drilling Rivets

Tryinf to do this with little to no prior experience. Ive gotten a few to "pop", but they dont move after the fact, in out or around. What drill bit size should i be using andbehat should be happeninf with the rivets when i "get" them?
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Old 02-04-2016, 11:41 PM   #2
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I didn't drill any rivets. I used an air chisel. Which rivets are you trying to remove?
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Old 02-05-2016, 12:16 AM   #3
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The rivets that hold on the metal wals and ceiling, behind which resides the old insulation.
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Old 02-05-2016, 01:03 PM   #4
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I'd get the drill size just hairline bigger than rivet hole. Use old drill bit to test for size, then order some solid carbide drills and a punch. I wouldn't try drilling out rivet with cheap hardware store drills.
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Old 02-05-2016, 01:37 PM   #5
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The chances are that you're drilling 3/16" pop rivets. Does that sound right? I've successfully used a 3/16" drill bit titanium HSS drill bit for 3/16" pop rivets. Going a little bigger, like a 7/32" drill bit will take the flange right off of the rivet every time. Make sure you don't go to deep, though, if you plan on re-using the holes.

A chisel will work faster (air chisel or hand chisel with a guard and big hammer), but it's more likely to damage the skins. Again, this is only a concern if you plan on re-installing the material.

My Thomas used big, Philips head screws to hold the ceiling panels in. That was a real pain! They were torqued on there good. I did a run with an impact wrench and the ones that didn't pull out got the grinder treatment.
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Old 02-05-2016, 02:33 PM   #6
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Chisel is a brilliant idea. I absolutely do not want the skins anymore, so, that works. Thanks for the tip. Though, how hard is it to hand chisel the ceiling?
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Old 02-05-2016, 02:44 PM   #7
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Not difficult per se, but you'll be sore. Ever try painting overhead? This will be much more taxing.
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Old 02-05-2016, 03:06 PM   #8
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If you have access to a decent air compressor get an air chisel at Home Depot for about $35 and a pack of chisels for $12 and go to town on the ceiling. If you look in Conversion Skoolie Projects for my thread "my build so far" there are some pics of an air chisel. In my opinion it is the only way to go.
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Old 02-05-2016, 04:04 PM   #9
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that's your opinion.

good work is when someone does least damaging to original part. lousy work is when someone leaves no return path. Normally, one can see workmanship or worker's aptitude by inspecting his work, never hire someone who prioritize speed over ingenuity and workmanship.

I watched enough of crappy work while working in the floor where they assemble million dollar jets, and some people (supervisor) force their way into assemblers, causing million dollars worth of rework and thousands of customer's complaints, makes me wonder how they ever become a supervisory position. These people have tons of rocks in their head, they just can't be dealt with.
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Old 02-05-2016, 08:59 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadrunner View Post
If you have access to a decent air compressor get an air chisel at Home Depot for about $35 and a pack of chisels for $12 and go to town on the ceiling. If you look in Conversion Skoolie Projects for my thread "my build so far" there are some pics of an air chisel. In my opinion it is the only way to go.
THIS^^^ is good advice.
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