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Old 08-19-2015, 03:17 PM   #21
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Roof mount tanks

Hey guys still in the research phase but looking to full time with my family of five. I was thinking about mounting a low profile water tank on the roof that would feed directly to our shower area and would be warmed by the sun.
We would still have a fresh water tank boxed in in the very back under our master. Anyone see any issues legal or other wise with using a roof mount tank I know I'll have to be aware of my vertical clearance.
Thanks
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Old 08-19-2015, 03:58 PM   #22
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Other than weight affecting center of gravity & potential leaks...should work.
I would not, however, consider any tank mounted that high that did not have a lot of internal baffling.
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Old 08-19-2015, 04:16 PM   #23
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Thanks yah it would be pretty small. Something I would fill daily or every other that could be drained and removed for when we're driving.
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Old 08-19-2015, 06:08 PM   #24
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Something an inch or so deep but with a large surface area would probably collect & transfer the most heat.
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Old 08-19-2015, 06:21 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
Other than weight affecting center of gravity & potential leaks...should work.
I would not, however, consider any tank mounted that high that did not have a lot of internal baffling.
What he said. Water is heavy. Over 8 pounds per gallon. Are you talking 25 gallons or 100 gallons?
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Old 01-29-2016, 11:53 AM   #26
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First time posting.

Lower the center of gravity, safer to drive. I'd prioritize safety first.
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Old 02-20-2016, 12:15 PM   #27
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on a scale of 1 to 10 how feasible is this or is it just crazy? if u have an undercarriage water tank mounted and secured, could you spray foam the entire exterior to keep it warm for the winter and then just box it with plywood or something?
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Old 02-20-2016, 12:52 PM   #28
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According to Ameri-Kart, poly fresh water tanks should be boxed with something rigid like plywood insulated or not. I think of the tank as a waterproof liner more or less, not designed to be structural entirely on its own. I'd like to figure out a way to roll some beads into sheet metal for mine rather than using plywood, but it's roughly the same idea.

Insulating the tank is a great idea. I plan to insulate mine too, though I haven't made up my mind between board or spray-applied foam. Keep in mind you may need a heat source too. If there's sufficient water in the tank (thermal mass) and average temperature is above freezing then you'd be OK. But if average drops below freezing for a while, or if there isn't enough water/thermal mass to get through the night, the tank would eventually freeze despite the insulation. You can add heat by consuming water and refilling the tank (adding water at 40-50 F), by looping back the output from the domestic water heater into the tank for a while, etc. Since I'm hoping to heat my bus with hot water/glycol, I'm thinking of putting a coil of tube under each tank to heat them.
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Old 06-11-2016, 09:56 AM   #29
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What are people putting around the tanks to protect from abrasion? Also, can the tanks be mounted to the floor supports safely or should I really Mount to the frame rails. Ive already put my subfloor down but seems the easiest way would be the bolts through the floor. I don't have welding experience or a welder and have limited space under the bus to mount my Grey tank and propane tanks due to the nice storage compartments.

Driver side has this space



Space between storage compartments is Only 32in so I would need a box type tank.


Ironically my 100 gal freshwater tank is a good fit to go in that space between the storage compartments and I could bolt that to the frame rails but I don't know how rugged those tanks are.
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Old 06-11-2016, 03:57 PM   #30
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I would use a couple aluminum fuel tanks and the associated brackets. Bolt 'em to the frame rails, quite possibly no drilling required. Welding would be involved, mostly just the required plumbing fittings/threads.
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