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Old 06-23-2015, 07:29 PM   #1
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HowTo Properly mount and install fresh-water tank?

15 pages into Google search, 6 pages here, and cannot find the details. I know there is something here, just can not find it. If there is something here with detail, post a link please. If not, can we start the discussion?

Best I can tell, I think I can squeeze a 70 gallon into the ass-end drivers side. I have no welding skills(maybe soon?), and my structural engineering is poor. I figure something that weighs 800+ pounds needs to be done right, same with propane mounts - right?

So where do I start?
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Old 06-23-2015, 08:15 PM   #2
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Put my fresh water tank inside the bus and built cabinet over it. Wont freeze when camping in the fall/ winter months. Alot of the older rv's and campers had them inside.
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Old 06-23-2015, 08:19 PM   #3
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Is it bolted down through the floor, or how is it secured in the event of a crash? That's a lot of mass if it breaks free of its mooring cabinet.
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Old 06-23-2015, 09:37 PM   #4
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I think campers would have many more options, depending on average length of trip.

However, my plan is to full-time in my skoolie, and NOT in a campground or trailer park, so I would like to have 60-100 gallons for my extended stays (3-8 weeks) away from the world. I am not willing to sacrifice my internal space, as that is mostly taken already

Not concerned about freezing temps, as when the extremes come..... I will go.
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Old 06-24-2015, 01:43 AM   #5
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Fresh water is best inside. I figure you build a box for the larger bed in the rear, throw the tank under there on top of some rigid foam and strap it down with heavy duty metal straps rated for the weight. You can bolt it through the floor, washers locktight on the nut, no welding should be strong and your water wont freeze in cold weather. You can gravity feed the pump below even if its 10 or 20 feet forward.
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Old 06-24-2015, 06:18 AM   #6
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did you check this out?
School Bus Conversion - Plumbing

it is an example of welded but I bet you could plan out some drill and bolt if you're attentive to securing the bolts from wiggling loose.
I also saw a setup where the box was plywood and mounted with some real long threaded rod.
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Old 06-24-2015, 09:26 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seroflorus View Post
did you check this out?
School Bus Conversion - Plumbing
Excellent, yes exactly what I was looking for

My fear is that looks a bit under-engineered compared to the fuel tank mount. It would make me feel better if someone said, "Yes, the fuel tank mounts are designed to survive 70 mph head on collisions" or something like that
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Old 06-24-2015, 09:49 AM   #8
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I bet you could email VonSlatt about the mount strength...he seems rocky smart to me and he's traveled with those tanks.

There's also the National Transportation Safety Board website where you can do some searching for fuel tank recommendations. I read over there about a couple of accidents in the late 80's in which the bus fuel tank was knocked off the bus...
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Old 06-24-2015, 02:20 PM   #9
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Ameri-Kart gives some recommendations in a document available on their web site. One of the key things they suggest is boxing the tank inside something with stronger walls -- I get the idea the tank should be considered as a sanitary liner to go inside some other container, rather than being a container on its own. Put it inside a plywood, metal, or fiberglass box, for example.
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Old 06-24-2015, 03:57 PM   #10
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found this: Hepvo Waterless Valve and plan to use one or two myself to save valuable vertical inches...
wondering if others have experience with it.
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