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Old 04-13-2016, 09:23 PM   #1
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Southeast British Columbia
Posts: 106
Year: 2003
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466E
Rated Cap: 72
ICBC info on conversions

I got this from my autoplan broker this afternoon.


Definition of a motor home (vehicle type 5)

Motor home means a motor vehicle designed or used primarily for accommodation during travel or recreation, but does not include a motor vehicle that has attached to it a structure:

• designed or used primarily for accommodation during travel or recreation, and

• designed or intended to be detachable


This exception is intended to exclude campers mounted on pickup trucks from motor home status.

Design requirements

ICBC interprets "designed primarily for accommodation" to mean a motor vehicle that has sleeping facilities and at least three of the following attached to the chassis in a manner that requires a tool for removal:

• cooking facilities

• refrigeration or icebox facilities

• self-contained toilet (not capable of easy removal like a porta-potty type)

• heating or air conditioning facilities independent of the vehicle's motor

• potable water supply system including a faucet and a sink


If the vehicle that you are registering cannot meet the qualifications that "designed primarily for accommodation" requires, the body style would likely be one of the following:

• a station wagon

• a van or window van

• a leisure van


When registering a motor vehicle designed or used primarily for accommodation during travel or recreation, use body style MOHOM and body style code 60.

Van or bus conversion

Converted vans and buses may be registered as motor homes, provided they meet the design requirements and the living quarters are permanently attached to the vehicle. This may include vehicles described by motor dealers as campers/campwagons or van conversions.

Structural changes require a "passed" BC Vehicle Inspection Report (CVSE0013 or CVSE0014) if not completed by a Transport Canada-approved secondary vehicle manufacturer or if the vehicle is classed as a ubilt.





What qualifies as a motor home

The Motor Vehicle Act describes a motor home as a vehicle that is primarily used and designed for accommodation during travel and recreation. If you are unsure whether a vehicle qualifies, pictures may be helpful, especially for ubilt motor homes. Start by looking for a door, windows, ventilation for cooking, and a bathroom.

Fixtures

Certain fixtures must be attached in a way that requires tools to remove them. ICBC also require that the vehicle modifications will meet Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standards as established by Transport Canada and that all the fixtures and materials, including plumbing and wiring, will be Canadian Standards Association (CSA) approved. For contact information, see Canadian Standards Association .

Water Supply

A potable water supply means fresh water for drinking. This supply would be kept in a sanitary holding tank that will prevent contamination and should utilize a pump operated by a deep cycle storage battery to deliver the water to a sink, shower, or toilet. Just bringing a hose to the side of the vehicle is not acceptable. It must have its own independent water supply. Note, though, that many RV parks do provide fresh water hookups, and this is acceptable.

Cooking facilities

As a minimum, the cooking facilities should include a refrigerator, cooktop, and a stove or microwave. A propane tank installed under the vehicle usually fuels appliances. The entire propane installation must be certified as safe by an inspector approved by the Gas Safety Program. For contact information, see BC Safety Authority . The fridge may use electricity (12 VDC or 110 VAC) as an alternate source of power, and many do, but must also be able to operate independently. The interior lighting and, sometimes, a microwave, will operate off a deep cycle 12 volt battery. Many RV parks provide electrical hookups as an alternative to the battery or an onboard generator.

Heating and air conditioning

The heat source that we ask for is usually attached to the propane system. A thermostat within the vehicle is used to regulate the temperature. An electrical heater powered by an external source does not qualify as the primary heat source. The air conditioning unit is usually mounted on the roof of the vehicle and is separate from the air conditioner that is powered by the vehicle's motor and used while travelling. The air conditioner for the living quarters is usually powered by electricity.

Holding tanks

With a sink and a shower, we also expect that there will be a grey water tank under the vehicle to hold the water until the next sani-station. With a toilet, we would insist on a black water tank under the vehicle to hold the sewage until the next sani-station. Without these tanks, the sink, shower, and toilet would have to be considered as incomplete and unusable.
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Old 04-13-2016, 09:35 PM   #2
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,194
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: 3800 International
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 72
pretty much the norm listing for most of us
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Old 06-02-2018, 11:00 PM   #3
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Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Revelstoke, BC, Canada
Posts: 65
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Engine: Cummins 8.3l 12v
Rated Cap: 84 pax
Wood stoves?

Know anything about the regulations regarding them?

And where in SE BC are you? I'm in Revy along with another converter.. both just at the beginning of conversions
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Old 08-02-2018, 03:54 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freakn View Post
I got this from my autoplan broker this afternoon.


Definition of a motor home (vehicle type 5)

Motor home means a motor vehicle designed or used primarily for accommodation during travel or recreation, but does not include a motor vehicle that has attached to it a structure:

designed or used primarily for accommodation during travel or recreation, and

designed or intended to be detachable


This exception is intended to exclude campers mounted on pickup trucks from motor home status.

Design requirements

ICBC interprets "designed primarily for accommodation" to mean a motor vehicle that has sleeping facilities and at least three of the following attached to the chassis in a manner that requires a tool for removal:

cooking facilities

refrigeration or icebox facilities

self-contained toilet (not capable of easy removal like a porta-potty type)

heating or air conditioning facilities independent of the vehicle's motor

potable water supply system including a faucet and a sink


If the vehicle that you are registering cannot meet the qualifications that "designed primarily for accommodation" requires, the body style would likely be one of the following:

a station wagon

a van or window van

a leisure van


When registering a motor vehicle designed or used primarily for accommodation during travel or recreation, use body style MOHOM and body style code 60.

Van or bus conversion

Converted vans and buses may be registered as motor homes, provided they meet the design requirements and the living quarters are permanently attached to the vehicle. This may include vehicles described by motor dealers as campers/campwagons or van conversions.

Structural changes require a "passed" BC Vehicle Inspection Report (CVSE0013 or CVSE0014) if not completed by a Transport Canada-approved secondary vehicle manufacturer or if the vehicle is classed as a ubilt.





What qualifies as a motor home

The Motor Vehicle Act describes a motor home as a vehicle that is primarily used and designed for accommodation during travel and recreation. If you are unsure whether a vehicle qualifies, pictures may be helpful, especially for ubilt motor homes. Start by looking for a door, windows, ventilation for cooking, and a bathroom.

Fixtures

Certain fixtures must be attached in a way that requires tools to remove them. ICBC also require that the vehicle modifications will meet Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standards as established by Transport Canada and that all the fixtures and materials, including plumbing and wiring, will be Canadian Standards Association (CSA) approved. For contact information, see Canadian Standards Association .

Water Supply

A potable water supply means fresh water for drinking. This supply would be kept in a sanitary holding tank that will prevent contamination and should utilize a pump operated by a deep cycle storage battery to deliver the water to a sink, shower, or toilet. Just bringing a hose to the side of the vehicle is not acceptable. It must have its own independent water supply. Note, though, that many RV parks do provide fresh water hookups, and this is acceptable.

Cooking facilities

As a minimum, the cooking facilities should include a refrigerator, cooktop, and a stove or microwave. A propane tank installed under the vehicle usually fuels appliances. The entire propane installation must be certified as safe by an inspector approved by the Gas Safety Program. For contact information, see BC Safety Authority . The fridge may use electricity (12 VDC or 110 VAC) as an alternate source of power, and many do, but must also be able to operate independently. The interior lighting and, sometimes, a microwave, will operate off a deep cycle 12 volt battery. Many RV parks provide electrical hookups as an alternative to the battery or an onboard generator.

Heating and air conditioning

The heat source that we ask for is usually attached to the propane system. A thermostat within the vehicle is used to regulate the temperature. An electrical heater powered by an external source does not qualify as the primary heat source. The air conditioning unit is usually mounted on the roof of the vehicle and is separate from the air conditioner that is powered by the vehicle's motor and used while travelling. The air conditioner for the living quarters is usually powered by electricity.

Holding tanks

With a sink and a shower, we also expect that there will be a grey water tank under the vehicle to hold the water until the next sani-station. With a toilet, we would insist on a black water tank under the vehicle to hold the sewage until the next sani-station. Without these tanks, the sink, shower, and toilet would have to be considered as incomplete and unusable.
You should work for ICBC they don't have a clue what they are talking about. After we were given the wrong info many times and our van is nearly finished it will never pass as a Class B motorhome as we do not have black and grey mounted water tanks under the van and a permanent toilet. (Have a portable potty). Also ICBC did not even bring up the need for a heat source. Devestated that we have had to buy APV300 insurance to cover the extra money we have put into the van. We are now at around 3k and we have 43% discount.

Trying to find out from a broker the decrease in premiums will be worth us potentially have to undo a lot of the work we have done to get things passed.

ICBC is the very worst cooperation I have ever had to deal with.
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Old 08-02-2018, 06:29 PM   #5
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Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Dawsonville, Ga.
Posts: 3,459
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Genesis
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/3060
Rated Cap: 77
Is there a difference there between a Motor Home and a Recreational Vehicle? I see a lot is required to have a toilet. Must be semi permanently secured, need a black tank. But it seems you don't need any of that because they use the same 4 of 6 rule everyone else does.
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Old 08-06-2018, 04:42 PM   #6
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Seems that everyone at ICBC has a different requirement. We are working with a broker now and hope to get it passed as a class B in the next couple of weeks.
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Old 10-22-2018, 01:01 PM   #7
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Location: Bath, UK --> Victoria, BC
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updates please

Hi chaps,

I've been following this thread with interest and wondered if anyone has got any further information?

I saw the last post was written in August, how did you get on?

We are looking to pick up our bus this week in B.C and I have spoken to a couple of autoplan people. I feel relatively confident that the process can work but I wanted to clarify what went well for you guys/ recommended brokers/ any further information before we take the plunge.

The first 2 autoplan brokers I spoke to looked at me like I had come from Mars when I asked for input. They proceeded to panic and make some stuff up on the spot which didn't correlate with any research and I think they were as happy to see me leave as I was to get out of there.

Thanks for your time fellas.
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Old 10-22-2018, 08:55 PM   #8
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Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Prince George, BC, Canada
Posts: 525
Year: 1974
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: CHEVROLET C60 just under 19700 lbs body#B10353
Engine: 350 ci on propane
Rated Cap: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maddog88 View Post
Hi chaps,

I've been following this thread with interest and wondered if anyone has got any further information?

I saw the last post was written in August, how did you get on?

We are looking to pick up our bus this week in B.C and I have spoken to a couple of autoplan people. I feel relatively confident that the process can work but I wanted to clarify what went well for you guys/ recommended brokers/ any further information before we take the plunge.

The first 2 autoplan brokers I spoke to looked at me like I had come from Mars when I asked for input. They proceeded to panic and make some stuff up on the spot which didn't correlate with any research and I think they were as happy to see me leave as I was to get out of there.

Thanks for your time fellas.
I have found that it all depends on which broker / person you talk to. I found a broker here in Prince George that was skoolie friendly. I got hung up on the safety inspection. So my build is stalled.
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Old 10-25-2018, 07:27 PM   #9
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Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 19
I’m from Prince George as well, who were you talking too I might have to go to them as well, thanks for any info
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Old 10-25-2018, 09:03 PM   #10
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Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Prince George, BC, Canada
Posts: 525
Year: 1974
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: CHEVROLET C60 just under 19700 lbs body#B10353
Engine: 350 ci on propane
Rated Cap: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by CapN View Post
Im from Prince George as well, who were you talking too I might have to go to them as well, thanks for any info
One caveat they want me to pay commercial for personal use insurance until I convert my bus.

HUB International
1955 Victoria St
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