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Old 09-11-2015, 06:01 PM   #31
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OK ... we are all in agreement that all the panels have to come down and the old insulation must come out.
If the fiber glass is ok and you are fine with it don't pitch it just reuse it. Spray foam or foam board great stuff'ed into place is almost as good

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Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
Something Nat and I pretty much ALWAYS agree on is insulation.
Closed cell spray in or board is the only stuff I'd use. At all.
Thats like agreeing that fresh milk is better than spoiled milk

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Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
Can you share brand names and availability in the US?

Unfortunately, cost does enter into the discussion.

I own a short schoolie and need about 80 square feet of walls to cover.

Can this stuff be had under a buck per square foot?
There a lot of DIY foam kits available on the internet and they are all within about $20-50 of each other. And as best as I can tell they are all so similar that I doubt you could tell them apart without the labels. It is also general accepted that the cost of getting it professionally done is usually not more than 20-30% more than a diy job especially if you screw up or waste too much foam.
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Old 09-11-2015, 07:28 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
Can you share brand names and availability in the US?

Unfortunately, cost does enter into the discussion.

I own a short schoolie and need about 80 square feet of walls to cover.

Can this stuff be had under a buck per square foot?
No, I'm not in the USA.

I live in Canada. Here It cost .75 cents to $1.10 a square foot by one inch thick.

I personally don't care what it cost. The savings in energy over the life of the bus will pay for the insulation cost 1000 times over.

Nat
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Old 09-11-2015, 08:49 PM   #33
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I like my milk fresh rather than spoiled, and polyurethane spray foam is good too.

However, there's one area where I'm not so sure about using foam in my build: inside the firewall over the engine compartment (rear engine). Fiberglass has higher temperature tolerance than foam, doesn't it? I'm thinking about 1-2 inches of fiberglass there, possibly with foam sprayed over the top for its moisture barrier and air envelope properties.
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Old 09-11-2015, 10:05 PM   #34
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Firewall use rock wool, it doesn't burn, ever. That is what you use to make this little glowing embers in gas fireplaces. I like my milk fresh, but I do likes me my cheese and yogurt too.
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Old 09-11-2015, 10:35 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by CaptainInsaneo View Post
Firewall use rock wool, it doesn't burn, ever. That is what you use to make this little glowing embers in gas fireplaces. I like my milk fresh, but I do likes me my cheese and yogurt too.
Ah you beat me to it!
YEah, rockwool is what I've been planning to use around the engine cover and in the wall I'm putting in behind the drivers area.
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Old 09-11-2015, 10:40 PM   #36
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I've always been told that rockwool holds a lot of moisture (?).
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Old 09-11-2015, 10:41 PM   #37
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Or they make one out of ceramic that looks like fiberglass, but has a even higher heat rating.

Most fireplaces sold around here use ceramic batt insulation, not rock wool.

I researched this awhile back because I'm building my wood / coal stove right into the wall, with a feeding door on the outside of my bus.

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I've always been told that rockwool holds a lot of moisture (?).
It does. Worse than fiberglass. That's why I went looking for something better and found ceramic batt insulation.

Nat
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Old 09-11-2015, 10:50 PM   #38
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Mineral wool absorbs less than 1% of its weight in moisture, whereas cellulose absorbs 5–20% of its weight.8
Performance - Insulation Institute

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Because unfaced mineral wool is inorganic, mold cannot feed on them like it can on other types of insulation
FIRE PROTECTION
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Give ultimate peace of mind with high fire ratings. Mineral wool is naturally noncombustible and outperforms all other standard insulating materials.

Mineral wool will withstand temperatures up to 2150F (1177C).4

Mineral wool does not have to rely upon harsh chemical fire retardants.

Mineral wool is an excellent choice for applications with especially stringent fire and smoke rating requirements, meeting NFPA 220, ASTM E 136 standards.
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Old 09-11-2015, 10:54 PM   #39
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Mmm, that would be for wood structures, not metal.

Something don't add up. People around here start plants in rock wool.

It must hold enough moisture for that.

What did it say about fiberglass for a percentage?

Nat
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Old 09-12-2015, 12:18 AM   #40
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OH GOD YES, it holds moisture like no bodies business I grew hydroponic potatoes in it. As a side not potatoes make for bad bathroom plants they take over to the point you have to move them to poop, what I have a bath tub garden. However that said you are using it on a FIREWALL so it should dry out quickly with the heat and seriously how big is your firewall? If you insulate on the inside of the cab it should be fine if you put up a vapor barrier on it. If you put it on the engine side who cares.
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