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Old 12-28-2015, 01:09 AM   #61
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I live in southern TX....its hardly ever cold here so insulation for me is for summer heat more than anything. I plan on using BusKote on the roof at some point and keeping the bus in the shade as well. We'll also use it to tour the country, but not in the winter. Anyway, for our purposes, EPS is the insulation of choice (or rather, the type that the Universe handed us

It sounds like my best bet is to place the vapor barrier directly behind my wall, ceiling, and flooring material, right? The EPS boards do not have any shiny material, which is why I was asking about the plastic. Would 6ml plastic sheeting work, and should it be glued right to the foam? I also plan on sealing any gaps with spray foam and use tape on the seams.
Jamie
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Old 12-28-2015, 10:46 AM   #62
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Is there any chance that this thread, or one that serves the subject "Insulation" more effectively, could be turned into a sticky?

Perhaps a creative administrator could join several of the insulation threads found on this forum.

Sometimes its not a bad idea to put all of ones eggs into one basket.

I think it might be helpful/useful to have discussions of this topic on one thread instead of on almost every thread.
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Old 12-28-2015, 12:28 PM   #63
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As I recall, vapor barrier belongs on the side of the wall that is typically more humid. For charles_m and myself that's the interior: in the winter the outdoor air here is cold and bone dry while indoor air is warm (capable of holding more moisture), is humidified by breathing and cooking, and often we even run humidifiers to add more moisture to the air. In the summer we do dry the interior air with air conditioning but the humidity isn't all that high outdoors anyway. Heating-dominant climates are often like this and end up with the vapor barrier on the inside.

Your climate in Texas may be different; if the outdoor air is very humid there in the summer and you'll be running air conditioning inside the bus to de-humidify, then the vapor barrier may serve better if it's on the exterior side of the insulation. You might check how regular buildings are done in your area.

In both cases the idea is to put the vapor barrier on the side that is more humid in hopes of keeping the insulation and wall assembly dry. The rest of the wall, toward the side that doesn't have vapor barrier, should usually be built vapor permeable so that whatever water does get inside has an easy path to dry out again.

6 mil polyethylene sheeting ("visqueen" and other brands) is a fine vapor barrier. Most adhesives won't stick to polyethylene very well; usually it's stapled to wood studs. Duct tape kinda-sorta works, but it won't hold long-term. You could probably staple it to the foam to hold it in place long enough to get the final wall covering in place.
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Old 12-28-2015, 08:33 PM   #64
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Well family wagon, you've nailed the reason for my confusion as to where to put the vapor barrier........yes, it is really humid here most of the year but it would certainly be more humid inside the bus during our short winter. I'll ponder this concept and see where it lands in my mind. Great info, plenty to work with!
Jamie
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Old 12-28-2015, 10:03 PM   #65
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I was thinking about the vapor barrier a little more this evening. The steel exterior of the bus is already quite good at blocking vapor, if not for all the holes through it... So what about sealing it up? With the interior side of the walls uncovered, maybe the mastic the HVAC trade uses for sealing air ducts could be used to seal the exterior skin to each side of each rib/bow. There's still the issue of all the screw/rivet holes through the center of the ribs too, but maybe those can be plugged with mastic too? I don't recall hearing this idea floated before and I'm interested in pitfalls or drawbacks any of you might see in the idea.
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Old 01-30-2016, 04:19 AM   #66
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Every automobile, maybe with exception of RV industry, uses vapor barrier (cheap plastic sheet) to prevent mold growth. Homes are built such way that this plastic sheets are readily available from any hardware stores, priced much cheaper than fancy bubble trapped material wrapped in aluminum foils. I've not yet to see anyone using this plastic sheet before installing expensive insulation material, I mean watching youtube crowds. It just amazes me people duplicate other people's work without first using their head to first rationalize their effort and justify all that spending.
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Old 01-30-2016, 06:21 AM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwang_yi View Post
Every automobile, maybe with exception of RV industry, uses vapor barrier (cheap plastic sheet) to prevent mold growth. Homes are built such way that this plastic sheets are readily available from any hardware stores, priced much cheaper than fancy bubble trapped material wrapped in aluminum foils. I've not yet to see anyone using this plastic sheet before installing expensive insulation material, I mean watching youtube crowds. It just amazes me people duplicate other people's work without first using their head to first rationalize their effort and justify all that spending.
Everyone has their own wants and needs. The kind of insulation most of us are using is foam based. A plasitc sheet over a bus' insulation and you're going to most certainly have massive amounts of mold. My bus had a default "vapor barrier" and I'm cleaning up the corrosion.
Do you have a bus? post some pics!
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Old 01-30-2016, 06:31 AM   #68
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I have no bus to prove my points, but gained valuable experience on a mini-van's passenger panel. I neglected to place vapor barrier back after doing some work in that area, and I noticed the evidence of mold few years later. Fungus just cannot have enough of plastic material used for vehicle's interior materials.

Fungus are easily managed once you know its presence; all you need is bottle of vinegar. The problem with fungus is that you can't tell its presence unless panels are removed, while it's contaminating and spreading toxic air for human to breadth in, that is known to cause cancer and rapidly consuming healthy human cells. Fungus is highly beneficial, only after you're dead, not when you're alive.

Imagine if I had used lots of insulation material, providing warmth and ideal condition to encourage fungus spread, this would have been a heaven for mold to prosper. Long time ago, someone told me about this barrier while I was working on the boat project. Due to marine environment and the material used for hauls, it's impossible to completely eliminate fungus growth, but this cheap plastic sheeting worked like a magic for a long time.

I would use plastic sheeting before insulation, not after. Bus's metal skin, vapor barrier, insulation, then paneling in that order.
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Old 01-30-2016, 06:42 AM   #69
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A bus sweats. If you trap that behind plastic, you're gonna have a bad time, man.
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Old 01-30-2016, 06:56 AM   #70
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You need to remember why damp condition exists. It's not the leaky barrier (bus's metal skin), but the condensation of air that forms the moisture and eventually the molds.
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