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Old 04-07-2016, 08:30 PM   #21
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Springfield, VA
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Originally Posted by DT Rutledge View Post
Well said Aaron. I think the comparison should not be with an intact school bus, but with a manufactured motor coach. In that case, a modified school bus is much safer than sticks and staples.


No joke there. The reason I plan to construct s Skoolie instead of spending similar money on an RV is that I saw a crash video of a low-cost class A. Couldn't put my kids in that. I hope I could build mine better.
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Old 04-12-2016, 12:24 PM   #22
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Join Date: Feb 2016
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Year: 1987
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OK great--- so we have a well-rounded perspective on the strength of the ceiling if panels are removed/not removed, and how to remove the rivets, if desired! Thanks!!

Any other thoughts on the general steps to prepare the inside of a bus?

Floors 101, walls 101?
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Old 04-12-2016, 02:18 PM   #23
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seat belts

I have spent the past few months gutting a 89 ford Wayne Schoolie (short bus).
We are moving from PA to FL. Because of our circumstances, we needed to build in bunks, kitchen and full size bed. This didn't leave room for actual seats. The only seat in the schoolie is the drivers seat. It has a seat belt. I have a son who is taller than me and a daughter who is my size. My son is 15 and my daughter is 16. This is what we have downsized to. We are packing what fits and the rest of our house we are selling with the house and auction.
I am unsure what to do about seat belts. There were no seats or seat belts to begin with in the original camper layout, so I didn't even think about it till now that it is redone. Any suggestions? Can I put seat belts in a bottom bunk? Maybe fasten them to the wall? I am clueless. We will be traveling through States that would normally require belts for my kids in a car. Is it different for a camper/bus? Any suggestions? I do not have the time or money now to rebuild everything.
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Old 04-12-2016, 03:25 PM   #24
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: chicago, il
Posts: 220
Year: 2003
Chassis: IC CE
Engine: T444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladybird14 View Post
I have spent the past few months gutting a 89 ford Wayne Schoolie (short bus).
We are moving from PA to FL. Because of our circumstances, we needed to build in bunks, kitchen and full size bed. This didn't leave room for actual seats. The only seat in the schoolie is the drivers seat. It has a seat belt. I have a son who is taller than me and a daughter who is my size. My son is 15 and my daughter is 16. This is what we have downsized to. We are packing what fits and the rest of our house we are selling with the house and auction.
I am unsure what to do about seat belts. There were no seats or seat belts to begin with in the original camper layout, so I didn't even think about it till now that it is redone. Any suggestions? Can I put seat belts in a bottom bunk? Maybe fasten them to the wall? I am clueless. We will be traveling through States that would normally require belts for my kids in a car. Is it different for a camper/bus? Any suggestions? I do not have the time or money now to rebuild everything.
An uncomfortable option is a ratchet strap as a lap belt and a bungee cord as the shoulder strap. If you have them laying around you could probably use them. I do not know the seat belt laws in other states so i cant offer anything there.
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Old 05-15-2016, 08:16 PM   #25
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Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Kent, WA (Seattle)
Posts: 389
Year: 1987
Engine: 6.9L Diesel
Quote:
Originally Posted by SharkBus View Post


OK great--- so we have a well-rounded perspective on the strength of the ceiling if panels are removed/not removed, and how to remove the rivets, if desired! Thanks!!

Any other thoughts on the general steps to prepare the inside of a bus?

Floors 101, walls 101?
I'm a month late to this post here, but I figure I would put in my two cents about floors based off very little experience, and no professional construction experience. The flooring should be insulated atleast 1/2inch, ideally with a radient barrier between the insulation and plywood. A member here Nat who used to be pretty active and appear knowledgeable suggested that it was not necessary to use mechanical fasteners to secure the insulation and plywood to the ground, but using adhesives would be adequate.

For the final flooring, I have read a lot of regrets from people who used laminate, hardwood/bamboo also is not suggested because it will likely rot eventually. I can speak from first hand experience that due to some leaks in my bus and neglect that my hardwood flooring went from beautiful to rotting and warped after one rainy season, if you are in Washington I'll give you all of it for free. Using rubber or vinyl imitation hardwood flooring seems to be the best choice IMO.
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Old 05-17-2016, 04:56 PM   #26
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Location: GA, by way of NC and VA
Posts: 140
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: T444e
Rated Cap: 66
Hey gang,

Speaking of flooring, do most school buses tend to have the vinyl flooring AND plywood subflooring when you go to rip it out? How thick are these materials, typically? One inch, three-quarters of one inch (combined)? Sounds like an odd question, I guess. Just trying to estimate actual vertical height in potential buses... sans-flooring.
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Old 05-17-2016, 05:11 PM   #27
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Year: 1987
Engine: 6.9L Diesel
I would say about an inch total, or maybe a pinch under an inch. The plywood was not less than 3/4 inch and the rubber was maybe about 1/16 of an inch, maybe, give or take.
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Old 05-17-2016, 05:31 PM   #28
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Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Arizona via Baton Rouge
Posts: 640
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freight-shaker (Freightliner)
Engine: Cat 3126b 250 HP
Rated Cap: Only 1 seat
I was reading in another thread that someone on here only had the rubberized flooring in their skoolie when they bought it......can't remember for the life of me though.
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Old 05-17-2016, 10:14 PM   #29
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Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: chicago, il
Posts: 220
Year: 2003
Chassis: IC CE
Engine: T444
You will need to check to be 100 % sure. When you remove either the cap at the front of the bus or the rear ot will expose either just rubber or rubber and wood. The wood seems to be 3/4inch plywood (measure yours to be sure) and the rubber dependant on manufacturer as to its thickness(again measure).
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Old 05-18-2016, 06:17 AM   #30
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Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,144
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Docsgsxr View Post
I was reading in another thread that someone on here only had the rubberized flooring in their skoolie when they bought it......can't remember for the life of me though.
My bus came from the factory without the wood flooring. Just a rubber puke mat.
Saved me a bit of work.
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