Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-24-2016, 12:42 PM   #51
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: colorado
Posts: 11
Year: 2002
Engine: chevy
Thanx for all the good info! Do you think I could leave the original insulation in the bus and it would suffice? I'm not going to the north pole and its already a Colorado bus that was used for kids so I'm thinking it was probably warm enough with the factory insulation!!! Feed back?
Shawna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2016, 02:02 PM   #52
Skoolie
 
sammy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 113
Year: 1988
Coachwork: Gillig
Chassis: Phantom Schoolbus
Engine: Detroit Diesel 6v92TA
Rated Cap: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by family wagon View Post
There will be a layer of sheet metal down there; the only question is whether there is a layer of plywood between the rubber and the steel. The steel layer must stay because it's the last thing standing between interior and exterior. Wood wouldn't resist weather under the bus as well as the factory steel does. .
Actually, my 1988 Gillig Phantom has no metal under the floor, just plywood. I took up a section, and can see down to the road. And it's still in good shape, other than a section by the front door/wheel well. Of course, it was used in California it's entire life, but still - 28yrs and still holding strong is not bad. It does have the full-width storage bays under it, which protect a big part of the floor, but those storage bays are ALSO just plywood, with no sheet metal under them. Again, totally solid. I've crawled in there and checked. I suppose those could have been replaced at some time, since that would be relatively easy to do, but I see no evidence that they have been.

Honestly, I'm a little shocked, because I would have assumed the plywood wouldn't hold up, but it seems to be good thick, marine grade plywood, so has done fine.

I'm going to be taking up sections of it, since I'm planning on a step-down shower, as well as a few in-floor storage areas, but overall, I'm going to be able to leave most of it in.
sammy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2016, 02:28 PM   #53
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Salt Lake City Utah
Posts: 1,328
Year: 2000
Chassis: Blue Bird
Engine: ISC 8.3
Wow, that is quite a surprise. Thanks for sharing. I'll amend my statement to "There will probably be a layer of sheet metal..."
family wagon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2016, 06:22 PM   #54
Bus Geek
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 6,172
Year: 1946
Coachwork: Chevrolet/Wayne
Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
Rated Cap: 15
Most of the fiberglass rigs have only plywood and there are tin buses built that way too. Personally...I never could figure out the logic.
Tango is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2016, 08:20 PM   #55
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: colorado
Posts: 11
Year: 2002
Engine: chevy
What kind of insulation should I use on the walls and ceiling and what kind of flooring underlayment??????
Shawna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2016, 03:14 AM   #56
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: WI
Posts: 21
Year: 2003
I'm thinking polystyrene for the floor..? but I am still not done taking all the seats out. lol
__________________
ALL THESE WORLDS ARE YOURS
EXCEPT EUROPA
ATTEMPT NO LANDING THERE
doctressjulia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2016, 03:16 AM   #57
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: WI
Posts: 21
Year: 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by SharkBus View Post
Dear Skoolie enthusiasts,

I thought it might be helpful to delineate the basics steps to starting a Skoolie conversion.

Let's assume that the vehicle itself is in good condition to operate.

I will write a list of what I am guessing needs to happen for the interior, just to prepare a nice hull to then continue adding whatever your specific needs are.

Please respond by adding details you think are important, or generating your own list of steps.

From what I understand:

FLOORS:
1. Remove seats, strip down flooring to bare surface. Sand out any rust or uneven spots. Use a sealer to seal up any places moisture could enter.
2. Frame in floor to fit insulation, add foamboard insulation
3. Screw down plywood on top of that
4. Lay flooring down on top of plywood

WALLS:
1. Remove walls, use a sealer to lock out moisture.
2. Insulate with spray foam insulation or foam board
3. Cover with...

CEILING:
1. Same story as the walls?


As you can see, I am unclear on the process and a basic step-by-step tutorial to prepare the "hull" (including any materials or tools that are necessary) would be super helpful at this point!!



Thanks!!
"Use a sealer to seal up any places moisture could enter."

What sealer? Brands? Tell me more, pls about sealer.
__________________
ALL THESE WORLDS ARE YOURS
EXCEPT EUROPA
ATTEMPT NO LANDING THERE
doctressjulia is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.