Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-25-2015, 10:32 PM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 7
Year: 1989
Coachwork: GMC
Chassis: B6000, Wayne Lifeguard
Engine: Chevy 454 V8 6.0L
Long-term parking on land.

I've seen some similar questions, but they're more about the legalities and such.

My questions are more practical, and I'm eager to get them resolved, as I'm moving to "some land" here in about a week, the beginning of April. Crap, its less than a week. Yikes!

The subject of my questions:

1. Sealing holes in floor from bolts and previous toilet/sink install.
I have some flashing from an HVAC company; they have plenty of scraps that they just throw away, and they were free. What's the best method to adhere these to the floor over the holes? We have one coat of rustoleum protective enamel down; under that, we had cleaned and ground off the rust, and used a rust neutralizer on the worst spots. (A rustoleum brand spraypaint.)

I'm wondering what to use to adhere the flashing to the steel-covered-in-rustoleum? I'd like to avoid screws if possible.

This is a serious budget project right now; Eventually, I will do flooring and insulation and all that, but I'm looking for immediate, quick, cheap ways to keep bugs from getting into my bus, or at least the part I'm inhabiting.




2. Parking long term on some dirt. What do to?
Looking for some ideas on keeping the longevity of my bus's driving ability, though I'll be parking for (most likely) several years. Let's just say, right now, one year.

Concerns with tires? I have some plywood that I can park the tires on. Good idea, bad idea? I was also thinking about surrounding the base of the bus with strawbales. I thought this would help insulate, and maybe protect the tires from UV. Again, good/bad idea?

Also, I've thought that maybe I should jack it up somehow and put it onto stands or something, to lift the tires off the ground all together. Not sure how this would be done, but just trying out some thoughts. Once this beast is up on a mountain, well, I just want to preserve the longevity as best I can. Again, looking for budget, clever ideas.



There are some other questions, but these are the most pressing for now.
There are some pics on my blog: https://splittingelm.wordpress.com/

Thanks for your thoughts and ideas, guys and gals!
__________________
https://splittingelm.wordpress.com/
emiholla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2015, 12:39 AM   #2
Bus Geek
 
lornaschinske's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Roswell, NM
Posts: 3,587
Year: 1986
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: 40 ft All American FE
Engine: 8.2LTA Fuel Pincher DD V8
Rated Cap: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by emiholla View Post
1. Sealing holes in floor from bolts and previous toilet/sink install.
I have some flashing from an HVAC company; they have plenty of scraps that they just throw away, and they were free. What's the best method to adhere these to the floor over the holes?
This is what I did. Does not mean you have to do the same: We kept the rubber flooring on top of the steel floor. I used a small hole saw to just cut thru the rubber and used a chisel to remove the little plug of rubber (the rubber on our floor is very well stuck down). I put a generous dot of Henry 212 clear elastomeric patch on the metal, placed a small piece of clean flashing (cleaned oils off with vinegar) cut to fit inside the small space removing the rubber left. Let dry. Then filled the remaining space with more 212 and let dry.

Quote:
2. Parking long term on some dirt. What do to?
Quote:
... I was also thinking about surrounding the base of the bus with strawbales....
Here is a link to a good mousetrap to make with a 5 gallon bucket. It does work pretty well too. I made one when an RV pulled in next to us that was literally dripping with mice. And you can use the bucket for other things later. Or set back up a mousetrap if needed again.
__________________
This post is my opinion. It is not intended to influence anyone's judgment nor do I advocate anyone do what I propose.
Fulltime since 2006
The goal of life is living in agreement with nature. Zeno (335BC-264BC)
http://lorndavi.wordpress.com/blog/
http://i570.photobucket.com/albums/s...ps0340a6ff.jpg
lornaschinske is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2015, 08:42 AM   #3
Bus Crazy
 
somewhereinusa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Andrews,Indiana
Posts: 1,636
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: AARE
Engine: 3116 Cat 250hp
Rated Cap: Her, me and Molly
From the reading I have done, the absolute best thing for tires is to "exercise" them regularly, preferably at least once a month. Mixed thoughts about covering them up, general conclusion is it really don't do any good. Depending on location plywood is going to rot away, quite quickly. If you aren't going to move it jacking it up might be an option, but at least around here things tend to sink into the ground when sitting. If it has "ok" tires on it now I would just wait until I was going to drive it then buy new tires.
somewhereinusa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2015, 08:45 AM   #4
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,205
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by lornaschinske View Post
This is what I did. Does not mean you have to do the same: We kept the rubber flooring on top of the steel floor. I used a small hole saw to just cut thru the rubber and used a chisel to remove the little plug of rubber (the rubber on our floor is very well stuck down). I put a generous dot of Henry 212 clear elastomeric patch on the metal, placed a small piece of clean flashing (cleaned oils off with vinegar) cut to fit inside the small space removing the rubber left. Let dry. Then filled the remaining space with more 212 and let dry.

[B]Here is a link to a good mousetrap to make with a 5 gallon bucket. It does work pretty well too. I made one when an RV pulled in next to us that was literally dripping with mice. And you can use the bucket for other things later. Or set back up a mousetrap if needed again.
My grandad used to catch rats and vermin in one of those. It works quite well.
EastCoastCB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2015, 11:40 PM   #5
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by lornaschinske View Post
[B]Here is a link to a good mousetrap to make with a 5 gallon bucket. It does work pretty well too. I made one when an RV pulled in next to us that was literally dripping with mice. And you can use the bucket for other things later. Or set back up a mousetrap if needed again.
These things are great. I have one in my attic and one in my soon-to-be-sold-for-a-bus-camper. The best part is the antifreeze preserves the little critters so they don't smell. Don't put them anywhere pets or wildlife can get to, though.

Peanut butter is the best bait. It stays smelly for a while, and mice love all kinds of nuts. Common myth about mice and cheese. Mice don't eat cheese. They have no way to milk a cow and curdle the milk in the wild!
taskswap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 12:50 PM   #6
Bus Nut
 
Hank's P-O-S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: MB
Posts: 275
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Tomas
Chassis: International
Engine: T444e
Rated Cap: 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by emiholla View Post

2. Parking long term on some dirt. What do to?
Looking for some ideas on keeping the longevity of my bus's driving ability, though I'll be parking for (most likely) several years. Let's just say, right now, one year.

Concerns with tires? I have some plywood that I can park the tires on. Good idea, bad idea? I was also thinking about surrounding the base of the bus with strawbales. I thought this would help insulate, and maybe protect the tires from UV. Again, good/bad idea?

Also, I've thought that maybe I should jack it up somehow and put it onto stands or something, to lift the tires off the ground all together. Not sure how this would be done, but just trying out some thoughts. Once this beast is up on a mountain, well, I just want to preserve the longevity as best I can. Again, looking for budget, clever ideas.



There are some other questions, but these are the most pressing for now.
There are some pics on my blog: https://splittingelm.wordpress.com/

Thanks for your thoughts and ideas, guys and gals!
The ground where my bus get parked is REALLY soft clay.
The few times I have driven the bus in and out has already created big ruts and deep holes where the tires sit.

Next week ill be going to get a bunch of used railroad ties to make a platform to park on. I was thinking of laying 3 side by side and then bolting them together using 1/2 inch all thread. Then chainsawing off the end to create like a ramp to drive the bus up onto them.

Then for the winter when the bus get trapped by the snow I am going to jack up the bus and set it back down on the axles. Im assuming that the blocks should get as close to the outside as possible to try and maintain some stability.

hope this helps.
Hank's P-O-S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 07:38 PM   #7
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,937
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
I would not do the straw bales. They will trap moisture, mice, and mold.

If you insulate your bus, you don't need any skirting.

I like the railroad tie platform other than the smell of creosote in the sun. It also pollutes the surrounding soil.

Holes in floor can be covered by a metal patch epoxied to the floor.

Or fiberglass cloth laid over the hole, and coated with epoxy.

Silicone down a metal patch after cleaning both the metal floor and the patch with isopropyl alcohol. This cleans the surfaces and ensures a good bond.

Automotive seam seal.

Ect.

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2015, 07:36 AM   #8
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 258
Note that where holes are near/above important things like bolts and engine components, silicone has an added advantage: you can get a pry tool under there and lever it back off. This works both for metal and fiberglass patches.

For fiberglass, lay out a sheet of plastic on a flat table and two layers of fiberglass cloth, a few inches bigger than your hole. Wet it out, lay another sheet of plastic on top, and squeegee to remove air bubbles. When cured, peel off the plastic and trim to shape. Fiberglass has a lot of advantages, it's just going to be more expensive than metal if you don't already have the stuff to do it.

If anybody has any questions about fiberglass I can start a thread just for that. I've worked with it for years.
taskswap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2015, 09:59 AM   #9
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,937
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskswap View Post
If anybody has any questions about fiberglass I can start a thread just for that. I've worked with it for years.
Thx tankswap.

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2015, 10:04 PM   #10
Bus Crazy
 
Stu & Filo. T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Vacaville, Ca
Posts: 1,521
Year: 1988
Coachwork: Crown / Pusher
Engine: 8.3 Cummins
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskswap View Post
Note that where holes are near/above important things like bolts and engine components, silicone has an added advantage: you can get a pry tool under there and lever it back off. This works both for metal and fiberglass patches.

For fiberglass, lay out a sheet of plastic on a flat table and two layers of fiberglass cloth, a few inches bigger than your hole. Wet it out, lay another sheet of plastic on top, and squeegee to remove air bubbles. When cured, peel off the plastic and trim to shape. Fiberglass has a lot of advantages, it's just going to be more expensive than metal if you don't already have the stuff to do it.

If anybody has any questions about fiberglass I can start a thread just for that. I've worked with it for years.
I've got just one question, will you come finish my cap for me, flare it in nice & make it even
Stu & Filo. T is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
care for parked tires, homesteading longevity, long term parking, seal floor holes

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.