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Old 10-31-2019, 12:21 AM   #1
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Residential windows?

Has anyone used residential windows on your bus?
If so, what were the results?


I currently have three residential double pane windows to put in my bus. My idea is to mount them on a steel frame made of 1.5x1.5 14 gauge square steel tubing. Also planning to laminate them with that hurricane film for safety.
One window was free, one was $20, and the other $30.

Thinking if the glass breaks I can replace it with "lexan", the clear acrylic stuff they use in race cars, which someone here suggested, and I'll at least already have frames.



What do y'all think?
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Old 10-31-2019, 02:26 PM   #2
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All auto glass is tempered. Residential windows can be purchased with tempered glass.

There have been a couple of members here that have used residential windows. Unfortunately both of them are no longer here so we don't know how it worked out.

I have asked about this in the past and got replies saying that the windows won't hold up. But.... None of them had ever tried.

Are you ready to be our test subject?
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Old 10-31-2019, 04:29 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
All auto glass is tempered. Residential windows can be purchased with tempered glass.

There have been a couple of members here that have used residential windows. Unfortunately both of them are no longer here so we don't know how it worked out.

I have asked about this in the past and got replies saying that the windows won't hold up. But.... None of them had ever tried.

Are you ready to be our test subject?



I SHALL BE THE TEST SUBJECT!!!

I am thinking that laminating the windows will solve any hazard issues, and that a steel frame welded to bus body will help with rigidity.
If they break, maybe I can replace the glass with lexan.
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Old 10-31-2019, 07:37 PM   #4
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I hate to be like this, but your probably going to regret it with all the shaking and vibration from traveling, not just the weak glass.
What I mean is the window frame itself won't like all the traveling....
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Old 10-31-2019, 10:01 PM   #5
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As far as the glass is concerned, and laminating of any kind, check into something like this. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004LDBPY2...v_ov_lig_dp_it

If you're planning on vinyl windows you'll have to give them more movement space than you would in regular use. I'll be using awning windows. Giving them a 1/2 to 3/4 inch gap all the way around filled with a firm but pliable rubber gasket material
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Old 11-01-2019, 12:50 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by PatrickBaptist View Post
I hate to be like this, but your probably going to regret it with all the shaking and vibration from traveling, not just the weak glass.
What I mean is the window frame itself won't like all the traveling....



No problem. I appreciate the input.
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Old 11-01-2019, 12:57 PM   #7
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No problem. I appreciate the input.
you will be unhappy with residential glass after your first accident and insurance won't pay for the injured people cut by the residential glass in your conversion - in most if not all jurisdictions, automotive glass is a legal requirement in all motor vehicles or trailers
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Old 11-01-2019, 12:57 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by jimburke77502 View Post
As far as the glass is concerned, and laminating of any kind, check into something like this. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004LDBPY2...v_ov_lig_dp_it

If you're planning on vinyl windows you'll have to give them more movement space than you would in regular use. I'll be using awning windows. Giving them a 1/2 to 3/4 inch gap all the way around filled with a firm but pliable rubber gasket material

That film is precisely what I am thinking about.




My idea is not to mount the windows right to the bus' skin, but instead to mount them on steel tube frames welded to the bus' window pillars. The original windows are aluminum and don't seem much stronger than the house ones. And they are mounted right onto the bus skin.


I am planning to have some rubber between the window frame and the steel tubing. Even thinking of using strips from an old backpacking matt to cushion them. Will use butyl tape between the frame where it is screwed in (the part facing out) and seal with Dynatron 550.
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Old 11-01-2019, 01:30 PM   #9
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This is my beautiful idea...
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File Type: jpg WINDOW MOUNT IDEA1.jpg (65.1 KB, 9 views)
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Old 11-01-2019, 01:36 PM   #10
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Correction...
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Old 11-01-2019, 01:50 PM   #11
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Sorry! This one is a better representation, with the steel frame welded to the bus, and the window frame screwed to the steel frame...WINDOW MOUNT IDEA2.jpg
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Old 11-01-2019, 07:47 PM   #12
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Look into replacement style windows. They have a heavier style frame, designed for more flexibility, don't have the outer nail flange, and you mount them through the window frame itself. As far as the "automotive style glass",(or safety glass) you can order residential windows with safety glass. In fact it's actually required in residential windows that sit anything lower than 18 inches from the floor. The film I linked is just an option. But there are also different ratings on the type of film that I linked. The main reason I was considering the film option is that the glass would act more like your windshield when broken because that has a laminated film on it. The original bus windows, having "automotive" style glass, also have a lot of movement in the window panels themselves.
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Old 11-02-2019, 01:11 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimburke77502 View Post
Look into replacement style windows. They have a heavier style frame, designed for more flexibility, don't have the outer nail flange, and you mount them through the window frame itself. As far as the "automotive style glass",(or safety glass) you can order residential windows with safety glass. In fact it's actually required in residential windows that sit anything lower than 18 inches from the floor. The film I linked is just an option. But there are also different ratings on the type of film that I linked. The main reason I was considering the film option is that the glass would act more like your windshield when broken because that has a laminated film on it. The original bus windows, having "automotive" style glass, also have a lot of movement in the window panels themselves.
I am not familiar with that style of window.. Can you point me to an example? My Google Foo is failing me
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Old 11-03-2019, 07:48 AM   #14
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Here's an example of a double hung replacement window. You will notice that it has the outside trim molded in with the window frame but does not have a nail flange. There are models/manufacturers out there that also make the windows without the outside trim. You will also notice the metal "foot" at the center of the window frame. This foot acts similar to a butterfly bolt when installing. Screw operated, it puts tension at the center of the window frame. You then put screws through the window sash track at each corner of the window unit.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/American...8786/204814543
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Old 11-09-2019, 06:08 PM   #15
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I don't think I could recommend this. Automotive glass has a sheet of material between two panes of glass to prevent pieces from flying around in a mishap or accident.

If I were you, I would think carefully about this.

I forgot to add, I understand this is a very old post, but good info for those that come after you.
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Old 11-09-2019, 06:50 PM   #16
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I would be concerned about leakage. Residential windows weren't designed to have water hit them while moving 65 - 70 mph. It would not be the same as it raining on a windy day.
Others have already spoken about the safety issues.
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Old 11-10-2019, 09:03 AM   #17
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It's a bad notion all the way around really
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Old 11-10-2019, 09:24 AM   #18
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"Giving them a 1/2 to 3/4 inch gap all the way around filled with a firm but pliable rubber gasket material"

Urethane glass sealer.
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Old 11-10-2019, 12:30 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by azdave85650 View Post
I don't think I could recommend this. Automotive glass has a sheet of material between two panes of glass to prevent pieces from flying around in a mishap or accident.

If I were you, I would think carefully about this.

I forgot to add, I understand this is a very old post, but good info for those that come after you.
You obviuosly have never been to an accident scene. Only the windshield is laminated, all side and back windows are tempered and when broken breaks into little 1/4" pieces. This feature keeps from getting deep lacerations as you go through it. Mine don't leak when I pressure wash them, certainly more than 55mph rain thrown at them.
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Old 11-10-2019, 12:31 PM   #20
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I would be concerned about leakage. Residential windows weren't designed to have water hit them while moving 65 - 70 mph. It would not be the same as it raining on a windy day.
Others have already spoken about the safety issues.
Nonsense, windows seal fine in gale force winds.
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