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Old 09-13-2015, 06:31 PM   #1
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Rivet removal

What is the best method for removing rivets from the ceiling and wall panels?

Is there really no way to do a specific search on this forum?
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Old 09-13-2015, 06:48 PM   #2
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Drill out the center of the rivet and then use a chisel and hammer to knock of the head.

In order to search the site just do a search on google for the term and and add site:Skoolie.net

Like this:
Let me google that for you
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Old 09-13-2015, 09:46 PM   #3
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Thanks Piersg.

After drilling for a couple hours, I ended up using a center punch to knock out the center of the rivets and then was able to use a chisel to remove the heads.
i'm starting to think it doesn't get cold enough around Seattle to warrant replacing those old insulation bats.
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Old 09-13-2015, 11:40 PM   #4
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Hi! So from my way of thinking for over all comfort I would want to replace and increase the insulation R-value for sure. But knowing that your in the pacific north west. I couldn't imagine not getting that old batt ins. out. The primary reason would be your long term health and even short term if you have any issues with mold. Here's a good read from one of the other threads last week.

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f10/in...nks-11210.html
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Old 09-14-2015, 05:52 AM   #5
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Not taking mold into consideration, better insulation means less work your HVAC set up has to do to keep the interior comfortable. Remember, the majority of bus manufacturers use batting that's cheap and provides a minor level of insulation, since their logic is "It's only used twice a day; it's not like they're going to be living in it"
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Old 09-14-2015, 11:29 AM   #6
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We get -35 here and there was still no way I was ever going to attempt to take all those rivets out!
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Old 09-14-2015, 12:12 PM   #7
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Way back when I had good luck using a thin metal cutting disk on an angle grinder ...cut an "X" down to the surface, whack it with a good cold chisel to pop off the head, then a pin punch to knock out the body. Much faster than drilling but you just have to exercise care not to carve up the sheetmetal.

Then of course...there is a tool known as a "rivet shaver" that is made to do the job but I found them pricey & tricky to use.
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Old 09-14-2015, 01:48 PM   #8
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Good old 4 pound hammer, a long 16 inch by 1.5 inch wide cold chisel with hand guard, and a good arm is all that's needed.

I don't understand why people are so lazy. Fearful of a little hard work.

All the mechanical ways can be faster. However, they are much louder, require $$ investment, ect.

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Old 09-14-2015, 03:28 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post

I don't understand why people are so lazy. Fearful of a little hard work.

Nat
I have all the power tools needed to do this easily and I still wouldnt do it! Not enough gain to bother with. You still have the issue of radiant cold/heat through all the steel.

Spray foam is the way to go but I wouldnt be interested in that stuff in living quarters.
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Old 09-14-2015, 05:06 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
Way back when I had good luck using a thin metal cutting disk on an angle grinder ...cut an "X" down to the surface, whack it with a good cold chisel to pop off the head, then a pin punch to knock out the body. Much faster than drilling but you just have to exercise care not to carve up the sheetmetal.
Exactly the way I did it.

My reason for not using a big (really big) hammer was that I didn't want to hurt or distort the steel framing the rivets were fitted into.
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