Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-09-2016, 11:24 AM   #111
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Miami
Posts: 167
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: MVP
Engine: CAT 3116
Rated Cap: 84
I think there was someone on here that did the roof raise by cutting BELOW the window line and lifting the roof and windows.
Piersg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2016, 12:24 PM   #112
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: AZ
Posts: 32
Year: 92
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: All American
Engine: 8.3 Cummins
Rated Cap: 84
If anyone is looking for it, i believe it's familywagon's thread that cut below the windows http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/th...agon-8577.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piersg View Post
I think there was someone on here that did the roof raise by cutting BELOW the window line and lifting the roof and windows.
captblarney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2016, 07:59 PM   #113
Bus Nut
 
Docsgsxr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Arizona via Baton Rouge
Posts: 640
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freight-shaker (Freightliner)
Engine: Cat 3126b 250 HP
Rated Cap: Only 1 seat
Think I will do smaller hat channel inside and larger outside.

Reason 1, I only want to do this 1 time.

Reason 2, my co-pilot is a beautiful blonde haired, blue eyed 4 year old princess named Olivia.

Reason 3, if I have to manipulate the manufacturer's original design, Imma damn sure gone make it a missile silo grade improvement.

Rivets and a Flux core wire welder will be my bonding items. And if anyone wants to know, I am a damn good welder, I can even do it under water!!! (1 time at band camp....)

-Doc
Docsgsxr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2016, 08:19 PM   #114
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,153
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
You'll get no criticism here, at least not these days.
Sounds like a good plan.
Post pics, of course, and carry on, goodly sir.

I'm not even a good welder, but my neighbor and several friends are!
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2016, 04:14 PM   #115
Skoolie
 
Roadrunner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Johnstown, PA
Posts: 248
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC 2000
Engine: 5.9
Rated Cap: 83
I just raised my roof yesterday. I cut the ribs about in the middle of the window space and jacked it up just under two feet. I used 1 inch square tubing with 1/8 thick walls. I also used 1/8 filler rod to fill the gap before welding. I will then weld 3/4 angle to the tubing between the original rib pieces so I can rivet the panels on. My mig decided to go south on me part way through and I can't order the part till Monday so I guess I'll have to stick weld the rest. I have some pics and will be taking more tomorrow so I'll be posting them soon.
__________________
Hopeless Busaholic!
Roadrunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2016, 04:26 PM   #116
Almost There
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadrunner View Post
I just raised my roof yesterday. I cut the ribs about in the middle of the window space and jacked it up just under two feet. I used 1 inch square tubing with 1/8 thick walls. I also used 1/8 filler rod to fill the gap before welding. I will then weld 3/4 angle to the tubing between the original rib pieces so I can rivet the panels on. My mig decided to go south on me part way through and I can't order the part till Monday so I guess I'll have to stick weld the rest. I have some pics and will be taking more tomorrow so I'll be posting them soon.
Please do !!!
Mash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2016, 04:39 PM   #117
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,153
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
Congrats!!!



Now- POST THOSE PICS!
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2016, 06:15 PM   #118
Bus Nut
 
Skunky Bus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Council Bluffs, Iowa
Posts: 370
Year: 1976
Coachwork: Wayne
Chassis: Dodge S-600
Engine: 360 V8
Rated Cap: 66
A recent experience reminded me of this thread and Nat's recommendation that amateur/wannabe welders use bolts instead (along with proper channel material):

'Bout a month ago, I was swapping bumpers between two Dodge B-series vans. Some bolts on the donor van wouldn't, well, unbolt, so long story short it was easier in the long run to cut the bolt heads off. Since the donor van was a parts vehicle it wasn't so critical I left all the bolts intact. And damn, getting those bolts cut was a b**ch! On that steamy day I thought I'd sweat enough to make a replica of the Dead Sea on my driveway.

Based on that experience, I think that if a car hit the tail of the van sideways, at the edge of the bumper, the result would have been a mangled bumper, held fast in place by those tough bolts.

Oh, and there is a grading system for bolts, designated by marks embossed on the head. Some research via mechanic's books or Google will help you avoid inadequate fasteners.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
I feel cutting the roof compromises structure.

Think about the arch. Then you will understand.

When I cut my hat channels, I had sections of floor drop. They were being held up by the roof.

The roof being one piece is the strongest part of the bus.

The roof needs to stay one piece.

Nat
Wayne Corp. used stem-to-stern metal skins externally and internally, at least on its Lifeguard series. Though the ostensive purpose was to keep the thing from splitting open and creating flesh-slicing edges, I'm disinclined to cut-and-splice my Lifeguard's roof any more than I'd absolutely have to.
__________________
Any action for which there is no logical explanation will be deemed "company policy."
- Akvol's Second Law of the Corporation
Skunky Bus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2016, 07:03 PM   #119
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 252
If you look at how it was manufactured it's all screws and rivets... tens of thousands of them! but you'd be hard-pressed to find a weld anywhere. Single piece steel ribs bent into U shapes and steel cross members provide the overall shape while the steel skin inside and outside provides the rigidity. Then thousands of screws and rivets keep the skin firmly attached and if one or more starts to give at least they are well reinforced by sheer numbers. Welds on the other hand tend to focus failure at strategic points and then fail catastrophically.

Of course as soon as you start talking about a raise you are cutting all of that material and attempting to splice in pieces and expect it all to be as strong and rigid as the original design which is never going to be reality. You can however do a very good job and I think that was one of the things Nat_ster was very adamant about.
jake_blue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2016, 07:05 PM   #120
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,153
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by jake_blue View Post
If you look at how it was manufactured it's all screws and rivets... tens of thousands of them! but you'd be hard-pressed to find a weld anywhere. Single piece steel ribs bent into U shapes and steel cross members provide the overall shape while the steel skin inside and outside provides the rigidity. Then thousands of screws and rivets keep the skin firmly attached and if one or more starts to give at least they are well reinforced by sheer numbers. Welds on the other hand tend to focus failure at strategic points and then fail catastrophically.

Of course as soon as you start talking about a raise you are cutting all of that material and attempting to splice in pieces and expect it all to be as strong and rigid as the original design which is never going to be reality. You can however do a very good job and I think that was one of the things Nat_ster was very adamant about.
Properly welded, two pieces of steel become one.

Look at how a trailer hitch is made. WHy aren't they bolted together? because they're properly welded, making them one piece. Sure they're bolted ON, you can't go welding to the frame.
A good weld is not a failure point.
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.