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Old 06-28-2016, 07:45 PM   #121
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The weld itself does not have to fail but it focuses the failure to vulnerable areas around it. I would direct your consideration to the Liberty ships of World War II.
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Old 06-29-2016, 07:01 AM   #122
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I think there was someone on here that did the roof raise by cutting BELOW the window line and lifting the roof and windows.
im not sure if they are on here or not but i have seen *A* bus in persoin that was in process and had been raised below the window line... to me it seems like it might help keep things in alignment and keep the roof from flexing as much to have the rib just below the window still attached...

-Christopher
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Old 06-29-2016, 07:18 AM   #123
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The weld itself does not have to fail but it focuses the failure to vulnerable areas around it. I would direct your consideration to the Liberty ships of World War II.
A fastener IS a fail point as it definitely creates the stress point.
Again- properly welded metal is as strong as it was BEFORE the weld.
Why are roll cages welded together instead of bolted?
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Old 06-29-2016, 07:34 AM   #124
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while im a big fan of fasteners.. probably because I cant weld worth a crap... I also believe fasteners are a fatigue point in the metal...

there are a number of reasons..

1. people drilling holes with old junk drill-bits end up heating the metal up quite hot in that spot..

2. fasteners flex... any time metal flexes it begins to fatigue... even metal designed to flex like springs eventually gives in to fatigue or becomes weaker... sometimes flex is desired to help keep from snap breakage but often times the flexing is not desired as it can cause failure of materials around it...

if I knew how to preoperly weld i would probably weld when I could.. esp if its something I'll never have to take apart..

-Christopher
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Old 06-29-2016, 07:48 AM   #125
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The shop I worked in built this. The lifting eyes are WELDED on.
So everything that is lifted with these spreader beams is suspended by welds.

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Old 06-29-2016, 09:56 AM   #126
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Totally agree on the welding over fasteners regarding strength. When a weld is properly executed there is no gap or seam. The two metal elements are fused as one.

That said, there are metal components on buses that should not be welded on due to tempering issues...such as the frame. GM and other have produced and distributed a number of safety bulletins outlining the proper procedures for working on frames and frame members which specifically state that no welding should be performed on their frames. There, you want to use appropriate fasteners. Hot bucked rivets being the first choice there. Also, any forged items (like older front axles. They can be welded, but unless you are a very skilled metal worker and can properly re-temper the metal, it is not recommended.
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Old 06-29-2016, 10:29 AM   #127
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How about both ? Bolts AND welds ?
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Old 06-29-2016, 10:35 AM   #128
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How about both ? Bolts AND welds ?
i think its good as long as the bolt doesnt place force on the weld that is detrimentel.. ie if a weld wasnt 100% straight on a corner now youy bolt down that piece flat it is stressing the weld and the weld is stressing the bolt... at least thats how I look at it... is the net result stronger or weaker??? depends on a lot of factors??

-Christopher
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Old 06-29-2016, 10:41 AM   #129
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How about both ? Bolts AND welds ?
SOme things have to be bolted.
But if you're talking about both as in redundancy there is no need for bolts if a weld can be used for the application. Bolts mean holes and stress points.
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Old 06-29-2016, 11:35 AM   #130
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The shop I worked in built this. The lifting eyes are WELDED on.
So everything that is lifted with these spreader beams is suspended by welds.

DiD they stress relieve after welding? When I worked in our engine shop all parts where annealed, welded then stress relieved,
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