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Old 06-29-2016, 12:00 PM   #131
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How about both ? Bolts AND welds ?
There are appropriate applications for both methods. You simply have to evaluate the project as a whole and the specific points individually. I think it's been said that using both for the same fastening is probably not only redundant but actually thaey would compromise one another.
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Old 06-29-2016, 12:06 PM   #132
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DiD they stress relieve after welding? When I worked in our engine shop all parts where annealed, welded then stress relieved,
I don't think they have to with proper technique and engineering, but I was way up the line on these kind of projects- all I did was cut the pats out on the plasma.

I can say these beams are OVER engineered and are tested and evaluated thoroughly.
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Old 06-29-2016, 01:00 PM   #133
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I don't think they have to with proper technique and engineering, but I was way up the line on these kind of projects- all I did was cut the pats out on the plasma.

I can say these beams are OVER engineered and are tested and evaluated thoroughly.
See and that's what you would want in a welded component is something that is well-designed and over engineered. I just do not see that level of engineering or welding experience going into most of our skoolie project. Most of the time we're on a shoestring budget!

If it would be worth it there are three identical Internationals sitting at Midwest Transit all with bad engines so they're cheap. If I ship all those down to you would it be worthwhile to do three different methods of roof raise and then we could send them out for crash testing to see how each holds up? personally I would like to know what would be the best method and have it proven before I buy the bus I want to do my actual conversion.
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Old 06-29-2016, 01:26 PM   #134
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See and that's what you would want in a welded component is something that is well-designed and over engineered. I just do not see that level of engineering or welding experience going into most of our skoolie project. Most of the time we're on a shoestring budget!
IDK, everything I've seen on here looks pretty kosher. See threads by Tango, Redd, Bansil, Sojourner, and Mudda Earth. All good welders.
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Old 06-29-2016, 01:39 PM   #135
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I'll raise the roof and add sheet steel for crash testing for you! How about a bulk discount of $20,000 per bus for roof raise. Materials and bus not included.


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Originally Posted by jake_blue View Post
See and that's what you would want in a welded component is something that is well-designed and over engineered. I just do not see that level of engineering or welding experience going into most of our skoolie project. Most of the time we're on a shoestring budget!

If it would be worth it there are three identical Internationals sitting at Midwest Transit all with bad engines so they're cheap. If I ship all those down to you would it be worthwhile to do three different methods of roof raise and then we could send them out for crash testing to see how each holds up? personally I would like to know what would be the best method and have it proven before I buy the bus I want to do my actual conversion.
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Old 06-29-2016, 01:46 PM   #136
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There is a time and a place for everything. All these items are on a bus:

Rivets
Huck bolts
Blind rivets
Adhesive
Self drilling screws
Sheet metal screws
Bolts and nuts
Double sided tape
Hope and dreams


My favorite are the long bolts that bundle one or two of the ribs together, then have nuts, and then are welded as some sort of thread locker.


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How about both ? Bolts AND welds ?
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Old 06-29-2016, 01:54 PM   #137
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Oh- and there's Aaron, of course... Great welders on here!
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Old 06-29-2016, 02:13 PM   #138
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I will admit I could be wrong and maybe I'm just in the minority. I simply look at it that if welding was the best solution for a school bus then we'd see more welds on the school bus.
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Old 06-29-2016, 02:20 PM   #139
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I'll raise the roof and add sheet steel for crash testing for you! How about a bulk discount of $20,000 per bus for roof raise. Materials and bus not included.
Well it will have to wait until I finished my engineering design unless you have your own ideas.
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Old 06-29-2016, 02:57 PM   #140
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I will admit I could be wrong and maybe I'm just in the minority. I simply look at it that if welding was the best solution for a school bus then we'd see more welds on the school bus.
There are plenty of welds. But only where they are needed. Everything is done the way it is for a reason be that cost, time, strength...
When specifically discussing roof raises though- the re-attaching after ribs are cut is best addressed by welding the pieces back into one piece.
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