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Old 09-03-2019, 03:50 PM   #1
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Roof raise vs mouth slap

So...


My bus' ceiling is about 6'6". I have considered a roof raise, or a partial roof raise.



But how about, instead of cutting the window pillars, adding instead another structure up top-like from a another bus?


Or...


Building a raised section in the center like the old trollies had.


This would allow me to build/add the section before cutting anything, thus keep things nice and tight and square.


I've also thought of adding the extra section on the front, cutting the top off there so that the ceiling over the driver area is lowered. This would allow about an extra foot of headroom in the loft, considering the max 13.5' height.


Just considering options.
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Old 09-03-2019, 03:56 PM   #2
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Or lower the center section of the floor and get your self a bowling alley.
Depends how much more head space you are looking for.


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Old 09-03-2019, 04:32 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe45 View Post
Building a raised section in the center like the old trollies had.

Known as "Clerestory Roof". Love to see one added to a bus. Some trolley-style buses have them.
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Old 09-03-2019, 04:36 PM   #4
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I was considering extra space to install the water tanks inside, under the floor, but it seems like a major thing to take on. I think I'd rather install the tanks below, insulate them, and add heating pads.



If I do add a loft, I can cut out some of the center and raise that part in order to store the fold-down steps.
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Old 09-03-2019, 04:37 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Brad_SwiftFur View Post
Known as "Clerestory Roof". Love to see one added to a bus. Some trolley-style buses have them.



That may work to store the fold-down steps.
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Old 09-03-2019, 04:40 PM   #6
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Trolley-style buses (with the raised box in the middle of the roof) are notorious for leaking badly. You'd have to build and seal it really well.

Something I'm thinking of doing is making a simple skylight that spans three "bays" between ribs. I would cut three- to four-foot sections out of two ribs, weld transverse beams across the cut ends on each side to create a rectangular frame, then covering the opening with Lexan plexiglass.

This would create a 4' x ~8' area that would give me sufficient room to stand up straight, since the plexi would be at the same height as the outside roof. For cold (or hot) weather, I would make an inside cover for it using aerogel, which gives excellent insulation with little thickness (at really high cost).

At 6'6" this would not help you, though (I'm 6'0"). I think you'll end up finding that a conventional roof raise is the easiest thing to do, especially if you're not planning on keeping the original bus windows anyway.

Somewhere here a few months ago posted an idea about bolting an upside-down aluminum flat-bottomed boat to the roof of her bus and then cutting the roof away. I'm not sure what happened with that plan.
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Old 09-03-2019, 04:49 PM   #7
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Somewhere here a few months ago posted an idea about bolting an upside-down aluminum flat-bottomed boat to the roof of her bus and then cutting the roof away. I'm not sure what happened with that plan.
Ya know, I like the idea of the trolley-style roof but I LOVE the idea of an upside down boat. That's just awesomely creative.
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Old 09-03-2019, 08:32 PM   #8
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Rather than using Lexan plexiglass, Lexane poly carbonate multiwall material gives more strength and more UV protection than plexiglass. The "cardboard box" design of the material also adds some insulating qualities. Just as an aside, the best way to attach polycarbonate sheeting is with 3M double stick tape. Entire greenhouses are so constructed.

Having used poly carbonate sheeting in my pop top, and after 5 years use I am still sold. I bought a 4 seasons down comforter and sewed it up to match the contours of my pop up securing it with snaps..Granted this took up a little head room but the instant 10 degree F increase in cabin temp (at the same heat setting) made it all worth while.

I've posted this picture before but we all know how hard it is to access info on old posts so here goes---again
Jack

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If I could find a place to store it, this is the bus I'd like to have.

.

.

.
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Old 09-03-2019, 08:41 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by ol trunt View Post
Rather than using Lexan plexiglass, Lexane poly carbonate multiwall material gives more strength and more UV protection than plexiglass. The "cardboard box" design of the material also adds some insulating qualities. Just as an aside, the best way to attach polycarbonate sheeting is with 3M double stick tape. Entire greenhouses are so constructed.

Having used poly carbonate sheeting in my pop top, and after 5 years use I am still sold. I bought a 4 seasons down comforter and sewed it up to match the contours of my pop up securing it with snaps..Granted this took up a little head room but the instant 10 degree F increase in cabin temp (at the same heat setting) made it all worth while.

I've posted this picture before but we all know how hard it is to access info on old posts so here goes---again
Jack

.
The asymmetric pop-top is very slick an relatively easy to fabricate. I don't think that the trolley-style Clerestory roof will save much money/time compared to a full raise.
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Old 09-03-2019, 08:42 PM   #10
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Is it correct that the polycarbonate multiwall stuff gives more of a diffused translucence rather than true transparency? I'm going to consider it since I don't really plan to look through my skylights very often. Being a lot cheaper than the plexiglass is certainly an advantage.

I would feel kinda weird having a skylight that was only stuck on with tape, but I assume you can't really drill through this stuff.
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