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Old 11-18-2019, 12:01 AM   #1
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Setting Bus A/C unit, lights, & sound to shore power / generator

Hi!

I just purchased a 2016 Ford Starcraft that has an air conditioner unit on the roof in the rear. I would like to be able to have the DC (assuming this is a DC unit) current turned into AC so I can plug the air conditioner into shore power while the bus is parked and turned off. I would also like the interior lights and radio to be powered by shore power as well. Is this possible to have them all hooked up to the bus while running then switch and convert them all over while parked? If so, what will I need to purchase and reccomdations on how and where to split the wiring? Please let me know, and my apologies if this is a silly question. Thank you in advance for your help/input!

-Jason
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Old 11-18-2019, 12:28 AM   #2
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The A/C, that’s probably just the condenser. There’s also an evaporator with a blower inside. The compressor is most likely belt driven off the engine. So to have cold you’d need to run the engine.

You could identify the circuits for lights and stereo and install a switch that switches them to a power supply/transformer.
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Old 11-18-2019, 12:43 AM   #3
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You're describing an inverter.

But as mentioned, nothing to do with the loads / devices you're talking about.

An small **electrically** driven aircon can be fed by a powerful alternator (DC, & 2000+W inverter) while driving, or obviously by an AC genset, but trying to do so off batteries is expensive, in most cases hardly practical.
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Old 11-18-2019, 02:12 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danjo View Post
The A/C, that’s probably just the condenser. There’s also an evaporator with a blower inside. The compressor is most likely belt driven off the engine. So to have cold you’d need to run the engine.
Based off the description of the vehicle, it should be just the condenser on the roof. I have quite a few of those Starcrafts at work, the AC system is by Transair. The compressor sits right on top of the engine, usually on a blue bracket, and is belt-driven.
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Old 11-19-2019, 07:40 PM   #5
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Thank you all!

Thank you all for the replies. This all makes perfect sense! I am looking to hire someone in the Los Angeles area to install a rooftop air conditioner. Along with wiring the interior lights and sound to an outside plug for AC power. Please let me know if anyone is in the area or knows someone that would be a good fit. I appreciate this community and all the help!

-Jason
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Old 11-19-2019, 09:21 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
You're describing an inverter.
I was describing a rectifier actually, assuming everything on the bus is DC current.
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Old 11-19-2019, 09:26 PM   #7
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Nope, this is an inverter
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Originally Posted by Jasonbrown View Post
I would like to be able to have the DC (assuming this is a DC unit) current turned into AC so I can plug the air conditioner into shore power while the bus is parked and turned off.
Rectifier goes the other way, aka PSU or charger.

USA RV industry uses "converter", yech
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Old 11-19-2019, 09:38 PM   #8
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Wikipedia

A rectifier is an electrical device that converts alternating current (AC), which periodically reverses direction, to direct current (DC), which flows in only one direction. The process is known as rectification, since it "straightens" the direction of current.
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Old 11-19-2019, 09:49 PM   #9
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exactly

For chargers or consumer PSUs, the term is used for the main component within, but also used for the whole product once in the industrial, telco / server rack arena.
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Old 11-20-2019, 10:27 AM   #10
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I'm taking my Transair unit out of my school bus because I want something that can be powered while parked. Not to mention it didn't even work to begin with.
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Old 11-20-2019, 03:06 PM   #11
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I'm taking my Transair unit out of my school bus because I want something that can be powered while parked. Not to mention it didn't even work to begin with.
You may want to consider keeping the bus a/c and adding electric a/c of some sort.

Your typical RV a/c will not be adequate when you are driving in warm weather.

I removed the bus a/c in my first bus. It took one trip to Arizona to realize what a big mistake that was.

I had two 12k BTU roof a/c's running full blast and it was miserable
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Old 11-20-2019, 05:17 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
You may want to consider keeping the bus a/c and adding electric a/c of some sort.

Your typical RV a/c will not be adequate when you are driving in warm weather.

I removed the bus a/c in my first bus. It took one trip to Arizona to realize what a big mistake that was.

I had two 12k BTU roof a/c's running full blast and it was miserable
Mine had ducting built into the luggage racks, which would have severely hampered interior construction. Even if I had figured out a way around that, the interior evaporators just took up too much space for my liking.

Plus this bus will mostly be used in northern Wisconsin in the summer where it's cool and temperatures rarely get above 80 degrees or so.
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