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Old 09-25-2015, 10:34 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by LP4171 View Post
Thanks for all the advice. Does the tongue length make any differences?
Yes it does. YOU'LL have to blow the dust off your geometry book though.

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Old 09-26-2015, 11:12 AM   #12
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Go to your local U-Haul dealer and check out his car hauler or
tow bar or better yet rent one of each and see which one you
like the best. I've used both and they are well designed and
worked great on 1200 plus mile trip both times.
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Old 09-27-2015, 11:28 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by family wagon View Post
Tow bars are usually hinged so they can move up and down freely. I think he meant the ram from the plow lift attaches to the tow bar, so that the toad can lift its front end off the ground by forcing the tongue of the tow bar downward, transferring the weight that would've been on the toad's front axle onto the tongue instead. Kind of a powered version of a weight-distributing hitch, I guess..
Exactly!
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Old 11-15-2015, 10:30 AM   #14
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[=nat_ster;124796]I prefer a wood deck over metal. Metal can be a real slip hazard, and even the load won't stay put the same as with a wood deck.

Also wood allows you to screw or nail into it if you have some sort of od load you need to secure.

The wood of choice would be fir. Fir has some of the longest grains of any wood in north America. It is the bamboo of this continent.
Spruce and pine will last a few years, where fir will last 10 to 15.

I recommend Not Flat Towing with a front engine bus. The rear over hang is so long it forces the front tires to drag sideways when taking a corner. This destroys the front suspension of the car in a short time.

To fix this issue, you would need a tow bar the length of the rear over hang of the bus. That is the length from the center of the rear axle to the back of the bumper.

Or build a simple wheel lift that lifts the front of the car off the ground like a tow truck uses. No need for hydraulics, all you need is the frame, a high lift jack, and a way to pin it there so it can't come down.

The wheel lift would be the best of all methods. Vary little extra weight, no added wear and tear on the car, traction on the rear bus tires, and great control when stopping.

I will be building a wheel lift on the back of my bus.

Nat[/QUOTE]
ATTACH]9068[/ATTACH][QUOTE

I've pulled A and B trains, flatbeds, vans, tankers but never anything with a 13 foot over hang / back swing. Can't seem to find anyone who HAS done this before...only opinions. I'd like to pull this 26 foot trailer [was a mobile home] with my 40 foot bus....I'm aloud 75 feet bumper to bumper here in Ontario so I have some wiggle room. The tongue is also a lot lower than the bumper, could put hitch further under bus, but little concerned about hitting corner of bus or a really long tongue underneath. The trailer pulls great, took this pic just before we went to Kentucky.
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Old 11-15-2015, 12:44 PM   #15
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That trailer has a nice long tongue to match the rear over hang of the bus.

Nat
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Old 11-16-2015, 12:08 PM   #16
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As a wood scientist by trade, fir would be one of my LAST choices. It has no rot resistance. Treated southern yellow pine is the only way to go, if you want it to stay looking nice, put a sealer/linseed oil on it.
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Old 11-16-2015, 12:20 PM   #17
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As a wood scientist by trade, fir would be one of my LAST choices. It has no rot resistance. Treated southern yellow pine is the only way to go, if you want it to stay looking nice, put a sealer/linseed oil on it.
I don't need rot resistance. That's what wood treatment chemicals are for.

Being your a wood scientist, you should know the length of the fibers in Fir make it north Americas bamboo.

We don't have southern yellow pine here. If you need to treat the short fiber pine, may as well treat the fir.

Also, I don't care what your education is. It's easy to sit in a arm chair trying to tell me what works best where.
However, I have had a work trailer most my adult life. We use it everyday.
From experience, I know what wood lasted on my work trailer, and what wood did not.
Pine is best left growing in the forest.

Nat
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Old 11-16-2015, 12:31 PM   #18
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Wow Nat, get up on the wrong side of the bed?

The fiber length that you are talking about is tenths of millimeters in difference. And it depends on the species that you are talking about.

It is hard to tell in the store which fir you are getting, so making a blanket statement that it is soo much stronger is hard.

Please refer to a span table from TP or SPIB if you want to get really technical.

I am glad that you don't care about my education - thanks for marginalizing it.

Good day grumpypants.
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Old 11-16-2015, 12:36 PM   #19
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As a wood scientist by trade, fir would be one of my LAST choices. It has no rot resistance. Treated southern yellow pine is the only way to go, if you want it to stay looking nice, put a sealer/linseed oil on it.
Welcome MSU, your expertise will be very helpful here. Most of us are civil.
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Old 11-16-2015, 12:41 PM   #20
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MSU:

We had a barn once in upstate NY. It was sided with yellow pine, excellent, durable wood. Here in the Rockies, the best thing we have I believe would be larch, then maybe fir. However, I do recall a lot of semi trailer decks made from cottonwood.

With all that said, I wouldnt know what to use. I'm an anti chemical type guy so of those choices, I'd have no clue.
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