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Old 04-11-2018, 06:00 PM   #1
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Using aluminum skin on a roof raise?

I'm new, hi!

I've been doing alot of reading on skoolies, I'm sure I'm buying one, I'm looking now. Until then more research.

My question is has anyone used aluminum to patch after a roof raise? Is it a bad idea?

I have access to aluminum in various thickness for cheap

Thanks for looking
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Old 04-11-2018, 06:27 PM   #2
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Elliott used aluminum to skin his roof raise on Millicent. He appears to have had good luck with it.

However, mating dissimilar metals can lead to electrolytic breakdown of the metal.

I am not that adventurous. I am using steel for mine.
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Old 04-11-2018, 07:32 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Whatthefak View Post
I'm new, hi!

I've been doing alot of reading on skoolies, I'm sure I'm buying one, I'm looking now. Until then more research.

My question is has anyone used aluminum to patch after a roof raise? Is it a bad idea?

I have access to aluminum in various thickness for cheap

Thanks for looking
It would be fine, but as PNWSteve said, you need to pay attention to sealing the seams in a way that avoids direct aluminum to steel contact.

Land Rover manage that by inserting strips of ptfe along the seams.
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Old 04-11-2018, 08:09 PM   #4
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The corrosion rate of the dissimilar metals not only depends on the environment and the difference in potential, but also the respective amount of the dissimilar metals. For example, an unfavorable situation would be to have a large area of inactive metal and a small area of active metal in any particular joint design. If this condition exists, the smaller active metal could corrode at an accelerated rate. This fact is particularly important to remember when using fasteners, bolts, and rivets, since they have a relatively small area in respect to the pieces of metal that are being connected.”


Pay careful attention to the corrosion potential chart and remember not to place a small amount of active metal in contact with a large amount of inactive metal. For example, never place an aluminum rivet in a large piece of steel.

Also I found this, but aren't most people using aluminum rivets?

Is it just a matter of sealing the joints in paint?
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Old 04-11-2018, 08:53 PM   #5
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Most people are using steel rivets.
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Old 04-12-2018, 06:52 AM   #6
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Also if I remember you need to use an etching primer for it. Not a super big deal your local paint house could tell you more on aluminium paint prep.
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Old 04-12-2018, 12:05 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whatthefak View Post
I'm new, hi!

I've been doing alot of reading on skoolies, I'm sure I'm buying one, I'm looking now. Until then more research.

My question is has anyone used aluminum to patch after a roof raise? Is it a bad idea?

I have access to aluminum in various thickness for cheap

Thanks for looking
Electrolytic reactions of the dissimilar materials would keep me doing aluminum. If you can pony up for steel, that is a better option. Of course YMMV.
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Old 04-12-2018, 12:21 PM   #8
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I treated the metals with POR15 where there was contact between dissimilar metal, Put multiple coats on each when possible.
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