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Old 03-27-2018, 09:34 PM   #1
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Welding

Wasn’t sure which category to put this in. I want to get my husband some welding classes for his birthday. He wants to learn so he can use those skills for our bus conversion. (Fixing holes in the floor, building a frame for the water tanks, etc.) Which welding type is the best for him to learn? My options at the local community college is a program for stick, MIG, or TIG. I googled it but I’m still a little confused. Which would you all recommend?
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Old 03-27-2018, 10:11 PM   #2
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Most Community College courses are pretty good. Go for all of the above...but a Mig will cover just about anything on a bus. And these days there are some great ones on the cheap.
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Old 03-27-2018, 10:16 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
Most Community College courses are pretty good. Go for all of the above...but a Mig will cover just about anything on a bus. And these days there are some great ones on the cheap.
Yep...go MIG...but if you learn stick...MIG and TIG will be easier

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Old 03-27-2018, 10:25 PM   #4
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MIG will do everything you need on building the bus.

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Old 03-27-2018, 10:30 PM   #5
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And WAAAAYYYY easier to deal with sheet metal. I have two Millers...a 140, which is more than adequate for anything on a bus including the frame...and... a 210 dual voltage (110/220). Both great machines and they sell now for less than they did 20 years ago!

Jump in and melt some metal!
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Old 03-27-2018, 10:36 PM   #6
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I personally have done a lot of mig welding on my bus.

Mig and tig are definitely easier than stick welding, although stick welding requires no gas and can be done in windy conditions.

Tig is more suited to stainless steel projects that have to look pretty. It's essentially a tungsten bit that heats the metal and fuses it together. I've only ever used it on stainless steel, so I can't say much more about it.

Mig is highly versatile, and that in mind you'd get the most bang for your buck with a mig welder. It can weld steel, stainless, or aluminum with the right wire and gas.

I personally have a Millermatic 211, which can run on 110 or 220 and weld metal up to 3/8" thick.
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Old 03-28-2018, 03:07 AM   #7
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Whats a matter with flux core wire feed welding. It's messy, but much easier than stick. Welders are cheap too!

Personally, I don't weld sheet metal. Seems like the hole just keeps getting bigger.
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Old 03-28-2018, 07:50 AM   #8
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Am I the only oxy- acetylene welder here???
Also a Lincoln AC buzzbox that is 40 years old (yikes), Lincoln 140 amp wire feeder with gas and cart and my new toy, a Lincoln 200 TIG.
All welders do the same thing whether through heat or electricity which is bond metal together.
Sheet metal and aluminum the TIG hands down. Steel framing arc or MIG.
As others mentioned Community College is a great place to learn.
Eastwood also has some of there own brand of welders that are a lot less pricey than name brands Lincoln miller etc.
DC stick goes a heck of a long ways for general purpse welding.
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Old 03-28-2018, 07:55 AM   #9
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The way I learned was that if you are a good gas welder you will be a good TIG welder.
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Old 03-28-2018, 07:55 AM   #10
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Harbor Freight has a new line of "Vulcan" welders that are getting very good reviews.
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