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Old 12-01-2019, 01:52 AM   #21
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Thanks for the information.
I've decided to use sheet foam for the insulation, with the spray foam from the canisters at the hardware store: the kind you screw on to the caulk-gun looking contraption.
Just don't want to deal with all the variables of spray foam.




Got four rolls of black plastic sheet and a couple rolls of duct tape to encase the bus. Planning on getting some old comforters at the thrift store to lay across the roof of the bus, and then the plastic sheets over that. I'll see if I can wrangle up an electric heater.


We just got a foot of snow here, and it's 16F right now. Its nighttime.
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Old 12-01-2019, 07:18 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Joe45 View Post
Thanks for the information.
I've decided to use sheet foam for the insulation, with the spray foam from the canisters at the hardware store: the kind you screw on to the caulk-gun looking contraption.
Just don't want to deal with all the variables of spray foam.




Got four rolls of black plastic sheet and a couple rolls of duct tape to encase the bus. Planning on getting some old comforters at the thrift store to lay across the roof of the bus, and then the plastic sheets over that. I'll see if I can wrangle up an electric heater.


We just got a foot of snow here, and it's 16F right now. Its nighttime.

I mentioned this in another shorter post about the same subject during the last freeze last month...dig a shallow trench a comfortable distance (maybe 6-8 feet) from the bus and use clear plastic (4 year greenhouse film is my choice, more expensive, but doesn't break down like visqueen or other cheaper products) long enough to go from 1 trench over the bus to the other trench plus 3-4 feet (maybe 40 feet?), use whatever insulation you can on top of the bus, place one end of plastic in one trench and throw a little dirt on it to hold it in place, take the plastic over the bus, pull tight and place the end in the other trench & add dirt. Stretch plastic smooth to your liking and fill trenches. Close off both ends how ever you chose/can. Work on your bus all winter in your solar heated/day lighted tent. You will probably still need to run your electric heater over night for the foaming session. The trench & dirt anchors the plastic and provides an air/draft/rain/snow proof seal. When your done you can build a green house or sell the plastic to get some $$ back.

This link is just for reference/price. I don't know/endorse this particular product or seller.


https://www.ebay.com/itm/Greenhouse-...NdDw:rk:6:pf:0



PS, the easiest way to get the plastic over the bus is to take tennis balls, poke a hole through the ball with a hot piece of metal, thread a rope through the hole and tie a knot, Throw the balls over the bus, push the end/corner of the plastic around a ball and tie the rope around it (imagine pushing your hand into the sheet and tying the rope around your wrist) Now pull the balls back over the roof of the bus & untie the balls and bury the plastic - or leave the rope tied to the ball and secure the other end of the rope to something to hold the plastic (no trench needed). You can attach as many ropes to the plastic as you need to secure it, you can use round rocks instead of tennis balls but the balls are better for throwing over the bus - softer. Rocks are free.

I also like the foam sheet idea.


Are you around Flagstaff? I live near (30 miles) Kingman. Not that cold here.
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Old 12-01-2019, 07:48 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by tugboater View Post
We’re hoping to rent a heated space for a couple days to get our insulation done. I’ll post a “wanted add” on CL sometime soon. That’s plan A. My plan B is to hire a local foam guy that quoted $1250 to do it in his shop. Downfall to that is he gets bad reviews...
The pro foam rigs heat the tanks and can vary the mixture. With that, they can successfully spray in much colder temps than the DIY kits.

I had mine sprayed a week ago and the temperature was in the high 30's.

For the area I had to cover and the thickness that I wanted it would have cost me around $1250. I paid $1688 to have it done.

I am glad that that I had done. I would have to wait until spring to spray. Now, with the insulation, I can make it bearable with a little portable heater. It was 26F outside when I went out to work yesterday. Inside the bus was almost 50F.

Good luck.
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Old 12-01-2019, 07:56 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
The pro foam rigs heat the tanks and can vary the mixture. With that, they can successfully spray in much colder temps than the DIY kits.

I had mine sprayed a week ago and the temperature was in the high 30's.

For the area I had to cover and the thickness that I wanted it would have cost me around $1250. I paid $1688 to have it done.

I am glad that that I had done. I would have to wait until spring to spray. Now, with the insulation, I can make it bearable with a little portable heater. It was 26F outside when I went out to work yesterday. Inside the bus was almost 50F.

Good luck.
I've got a 39' bus that I wintered in last year and I used 2 LP heaters and it was plenty hot inside down to the single digits with lots of wind while living right on the river. I don't have any spray foam, just 1" foam boards over most the walls, still have the org insulation in the roof. While insulation makes it way better, you can live comfortable without it. The back bed room has foam board up covering the windows and all but not the other 3/4 of the bus. People make a big deal about having to have foam and all but in reality 2 buddy heaters do fine with little insulation.
I won't do the spray foam because of the reports of toxic off gassing.
I do plan to take the ceiling down and put foam board up and use some spray foam in a few spots but I sure won't coat the inside of my bus with it. No insulation on the floor either, laminate flooring was used.
While I don't argue insulation is king, buses sure aren't the worst I've seen without it, both RVs I've had were more drafty that my bus ever has been and one had a heated basement, both had foam board under the floors.
The front door is something Im about to reckon with, it's the real drafty item, I am about to weld it into 1 piece and make it seal better.
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If you would like to check out my website that has all sort of information especially for the T444E/7.3PSD engines check out www.PatrickTheSalvageGuy.com I've got helpful downloads and articles as well as a link to my YT for other how to videos mainly on the F series trucks.
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Old 12-01-2019, 08:23 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidharris View Post
I mentioned this in another shorter post about the same subject during the last freeze last month...dig a shallow trench a comfortable distance (maybe 6-8 feet) from the bus and use clear plastic (4 year greenhouse film is my choice, more expensive, but doesn't break down like visqueen or other cheaper products) long enough to go from 1 trench over the bus to the other trench plus 3-4 feet (maybe 40 feet?), use whatever insulation you can on top of the bus, place one end of plastic in one trench and throw a little dirt on it to hold it in place, take the plastic over the bus, pull tight and place the end in the other trench & add dirt. Stretch plastic smooth to your liking and fill trenches. Close off both ends how ever you chose/can. Work on your bus all winter in your solar heated/day lighted tent. You will probably still need to run your electric heater over night for the foaming session. The trench & dirt anchors the plastic and provides an air/draft/rain/snow proof seal. When your done you can build a green house or sell the plastic to get some $$ back.

This link is just for reference/price. I don't know/endorse this particular product or seller.


https://www.ebay.com/itm/Greenhouse-...NdDw:rk:6:pf:0



PS, the easiest way to get the plastic over the bus is to take tennis balls, poke a hole through the ball with a hot piece of metal, thread a rope through the hole and tie a knot, Throw the balls over the bus, push the end/corner of the plastic around a ball and tie the rope around it (imagine pushing your hand into the sheet and tying the rope around your wrist) Now pull the balls back over the roof of the bus & untie the balls and bury the plastic - or leave the rope tied to the ball and secure the other end of the rope to something to hold the plastic (no trench needed). You can attach as many ropes to the plastic as you need to secure it, you can use round rocks instead of tennis balls but the balls are better for throwing over the bus - softer. Rocks are free.

I also like the foam sheet idea.


Are you around Flagstaff? I live near (30 miles) Kingman. Not that cold here.





Thanks for that idea. I bought some black plastic, so I may return two and get two clear ones, keeping the black ones on the top, over some old thrift store comforters or moving blankets.


I live in the White Mountains area: Pinetop. Same weather as Flagstaff, which is 2.5 hrs West of me. I taught in Ash Fork for a year.



This is today:
IMG_1225.jpg

IMG_1226.jpg
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Old 12-01-2019, 11:01 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe45 View Post
Thanks for that idea. I bought some black plastic, so I may return two and get two clear ones, keeping the black ones on the top, over some old thrift store comforters or moving blankets.


I live in the White Mountains area: Pinetop. Same weather as Flagstaff, which is 2.5 hrs West of me. I taught in Ash Fork for a year.



This is today:
Attachment 39716

Attachment 39717



Not a lot of sunshine to work with for heat, but cutting off the air movement will still help a lot.
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Old 12-02-2019, 01:29 AM   #27
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I just finished my spray foam. From my experience I can tell you this, I have a 30' bus and used a 600 and a 620 kit, I spent almost 1600 on the two kits. I got a quote for 1400 to have it done and I wish I would have. The metal temp isn't as critical as the foam tank temp. In the literature I got with my kits it states that the substrate can be down to 40 degrees but the tank temp HAS to be between 70-95 degress for at least 24 hrs before you use it. The professionals have a heater in their trucks that heat their material at 120 degrees. While mine turned out well, I probably would have gotten a little more foam from having a company do it, it's light on a few areas because I wanted to make sure it all got covered, they don't necessarily have to worry about running out. Hind sight is priceless!
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Old 12-02-2019, 04:49 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by jassr1 View Post
I just finished my spray foam. From my experience I can tell you this, I have a 30' bus and used a 600 and a 620 kit, I spent almost 1600 on the two kits. I got a quote for 1400 to have it done and I wish I would have. The metal temp isn't as critical as the foam tank temp. In the literature I got with my kits it states that the substrate can be down to 40 degrees but the tank temp HAS to be between 70-95 degress for at least 24 hrs before you use it. The professionals have a heater in their trucks that heat their material at 120 degrees. While mine turned out well, I probably would have gotten a little more foam from having a company do it, it's light on a few areas because I wanted to make sure it all got covered, they don't necessarily have to worry about running out. Hind sight is priceless!



Good to know, thanks
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