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Old 08-19-2019, 03:50 PM   #21
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Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 582
Year: 2007
Coachwork: Thomas Built
Chassis: Minotour
Engine: Chevy Express 3500 6.6l
1. Mechanically sound.

2. Tear out

3. Floor if you are tearing out and replacing/insulating. This does not include floor covering

4. Rough electrical and plumbing

5. Insulate/wall covering

6. Floor covering

7. Carpentry/Furniture

8. Appliances/finish electrical/finish plumbing

9. Curtain/shades

10. Paint exterior. This could be done after any hatches or brackets/fixtures for rough electrical and plumbing.
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Old 08-19-2019, 04:41 PM   #22
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Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 1,189
Year: 2003
Coachwork: International
Chassis: CE 300
Engine: DT466
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Originally Posted by DreamWeaverBus View Post
I found this video on flipping the windows a while back! I'm still considering if I want to do this or not, I kinda like the opening in the windows being higher up, but then it's a little counter to what we usually do with windows. Still, here ya go!

I was going to do this but then I realized how much work was involved (for 16 windows altogether). Also, I want to be able to keep my windows open when it's raining, and the standard bus windows will actually work better for this as long as I cover the top half with an awning of some sort (probably homemade with plexiglass). If the bottom one opened it would be much easier for rain to blow inside - in fact this is what always happens to me in my house when I leave the windows up.
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Old 08-21-2019, 12:31 PM   #23
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Location: Hotzona
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Year: 2003
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Engine: Navistar T444e
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Disclaimer: This is not based on experience. At least not one we're done experiencing yet.

Our methodology is to rip out everything inside to expose what needs exposing and fix what needs fixing, then seal everything from the outside in - and top down - before we begin putting anything in. So first we removed all the seats, flooring, interior walls and ceiling (still need to pull back wall), insulation, pulled the windows, etc. That exposed a couple leaks that need repair, a few dents we'll be able to help bang out from the inside, and many areas of rust that are getting attention.

Our next step will be to repair said leaks (one is a missing roof rivet), and seal the exterior. That means the first thing we need to do is replace the e-hatches with sheet metal (we can cut holes later for AC or fans), prep/seal/paint the roof, prep/seal/paint the body, and reinstall the windows/lights/reflectors/body-penetrations.

THEN we'll finally be be able to move forward with the interior without having to worry about water seeping in and ruining our work.
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Old 08-21-2019, 01:30 PM   #24
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Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Western Oregon
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Year: 1995
Coachwork: Blue-Bird
Chassis: TC RE 3408
Engine: 5.9 Cummins 12V Mechanical/Allison MT643
Rated Cap: Blue-Bird says 72 pass.
That's an interesting video, but someone should explain the concept of editing to the guy who made it. There are stretches where you can't clearly see what he is doing with his hands, and he says nothing during most of these stretches to help people understand what's going on.

But I think this is basically a good idea and I intend to do a few windows like this so I can put screens on them so I can have a little natural cross-ventilation when appropriate. The rest of the windows will get sealed shut with caulking.
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Old 08-21-2019, 04:05 PM   #25
Almost There
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Amarillo Tx
Posts: 80
Year: 1999
Coachwork: International
Chassis: 3800
Engine: T444EIEIO
Rated Cap: 8 window?
My order of operations is back door to front door.



Like Danjo indicated - mechanically sound, then floor, then insulation, then ceiling. After that I just started at the back of the bus and have been working my way forward to the drivers seat since November 2018. I work on something until I hit a roadblock, then I switch to work on something else while I devise a plan of action on the roadblock. This project has been an enjoyable distraction from the day-to-day work life.



Guessing about One more month of work and I should be ready to title and tag this beast. I won't be done with the solar, exterior paint, rear deck. But it will be rolling under it's own power and it will be usable. I will be happy to see it roll out of the back yard. Thank You Jesus!
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Old 09-01-2019, 04:03 PM   #26
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What kind of paint is recc, or links..new to this and trying to search..help would be appreciated
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Old 09-01-2019, 04:15 PM   #27
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Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Huntington beach
Posts: 701
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: T/C 2000 28 foot Handy Bus
Engine: Cummins 5.9 Mechanical
Rated Cap: 2
I agree with Danjoe also. Our small change was to paint the exterior after Engine, trans and brakes were completed so that we can drive around a nice bus and still use it while we are converting it. Not planning on living in it more of an RV type usage.
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Old 09-29-2019, 10:46 PM   #28
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Join Date: Feb 2017
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reg in MiAMI

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Originally Posted by annvp89 View Post
Sorry I've ghosted!! I finally got my baby and she manage to survive the Hurricane!!! Also for anyone that's looking for someone easy to change the title to RV in Miami get in touch! I was in and out with a tag and the title changed in 25 min!

I think I'll take the recurring advice of doing electric and plumbing first! Shall I wait for floors as well or does it not make much of a difference if I do floors and then electrics and plumbing and then move on to the infrastructure?


Thank you all again for taking the time to reply that's been really helpful!



'looking to register skoolie as MH send info!
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Old 10-09-2019, 11:31 AM   #29
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Location: NUNYA
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Year: 1995
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Engine: DT408, AT545
Rated Cap: 23 500 gvw
1. Insurance...everything else after.
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Old 10-09-2019, 11:50 AM   #30
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Location: Foot of the siskiyou mountains Oregon.
Posts: 177
Year: 1989
Coachwork: Thomas / international
Chassis: International
Engine: Dt 360/ spicer 5 speed
Rated Cap: 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danjo View Post
1. Mechanically sound.

2. Tear out

3. Floor if you are tearing out and replacing/insulating. This does not include floor covering

4. Rough electrical and plumbing

5. Insulate/wall covering

6. Floor covering

7. Carpentry/Furniture

8. Appliances/finish electrical/finish plumbing

9. Curtain/shades

10. Paint exterior. This could be done after any hatches or brackets/fixtures for rough electrical and plumbing.
No.3 should be to paint your roof or confirm first hand and beyond any doubt that it doesn't leak. Then move to your windows. It's lame to discover leaks by way of puddles on your nice new floor. I wouldn't just take the sellers word for it personally.
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Old 10-09-2019, 12:16 PM   #31
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Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Western Oregon
Posts: 486
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Blue-Bird
Chassis: TC RE 3408
Engine: 5.9 Cummins 12V Mechanical/Allison MT643
Rated Cap: Blue-Bird says 72 pass.
@SolomonEagle, I agree with your assessment. In my case I was proceeding with the floor when we got a bit of early rain that lasted for about 6 hours. This was the first preciptation after I had removed the ceiling metal and insulation about 2 months earlier.. I had, of course, carefully inspected the inside of the roof for any signs of leaks after stripping out the OEM ceiling, but I did not see any, not until after it had rained fairly hard for several hours.

Then I realized that some of the holes where I'd removed the rivets holding the perforated steel ceiling in place were oozing water. I wouldn't call these real leaks, just minor seepage around the rivets. I don't think most of them were bad enough to cause any real problems then, but I assumed they would just keep slowly getting worse until they leaked more, and some of them leaked a lot.

I had intended to wait to coat the roof next spring, but after discovering the seepage, which I would not have noticed except for that unseasonal rain, I have put the floor construction on hold and have been prepping the roof for a coat of primer and then TropiCool.

After that I will caulk the windows and then build my floor.
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