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Old 03-25-2016, 11:17 AM   #171
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Join Date: May 2014
Location: West Ohio
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Did you end up getting a turbo?
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Old 03-25-2016, 03:47 PM   #172
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Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Oregon
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Year: 1984
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Well it's that time again. Time to drive this old beast across the country. Only this time I'll be towing a toad, my orange 1974 beetle.(flat glass, not a super). Well, some hills in Colorado had me crawling at 35-maybe 40 geared down last time, and I don't know how she might manage with the additional 1500 pounds behind her. Sooooo after a lot of reading about torque loads, compression ratios, failure points, egts, intercoolers, etc. I have ordered a sidewinder adjustable wastegated turbo system from Banks. Yeah it cost 2500, about what I paid for my bus, but it's worth it to me.
Something very interesting that people don't always consider is that, once turbo charged, the 6.9 100% competes with the 5.9 cummins in torque and horsepower, but it can also spin almost twice as fast, meaning that for the same transmission and differential and tired size etc, the 6.9 will give you a higher top speed than the 5.9 with the same amount of torque. Ponder that for a while lol.
I'll be installing the turbo next weekend after it arrives. It's not like I'm gonna be chirping burnouts anytime soon but I'll end up with about 80 more rwhp. And about 200-300 more ft lbs of peak torque. I've got my work cut out for me, between the turbo and the transmission, at he end of it, I'm going to deserve a very relaxing cold beer
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Old 03-25-2016, 03:54 PM   #173
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After that brownie box, you DESERVE the turbo. Cheers, man.
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Old 03-25-2016, 04:16 PM   #174
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Are you going to do anything about additional cooling? Pix man, pix!!!
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Old 03-25-2016, 06:30 PM   #175
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I am coming into this conversation a long time after the middle of the show so I don't know how my comments will fit in with the rest of the discussion.

First off, I would not turn that engine faster than 2600 RPM except for once in a blue moon. It wasn't designed or built to spin much faster than that. About the only thing you do when you spin it much faster is you use more fuel faster. The torque and HP start going the wrong direction after about 2500 RPM.

Second, in regards to using a brownie, I think that is a very elegant way in which to get OD gears. The reason you don't see them that often is most people can't shift an automatic transmission properly. To try and train fleet drivers how to shift an auxiliary transmission is a non-starter in most bus fleets. Besides, since most school buses spend more than 95% of their service life at speeds less than 35 MPH the need for a lot of gears is just not worth the extra $$$. I am glad you didn't try to mount a 2-speed rear end. The gearing in all of those were geared for speeds from back in the day and not for the highways of today. You would have ended up with slow and slower.

Third, putting a turbo on your engine is a GREAT idea. Going with the Banks kit even better. When Ford started offering that engine with a turbo Banks was the OEM parts vendor to Ford. Without increasing the amount of HP it won't matter how many gears you have. It takes a certain amount of HP and torque to get a vehicle down the road and up the hills. You could double the number of gears you have and it won't make a bit of difference on how fast you get up the hill if you don't increase the HP and torque.

Fourth, now that you are going to be putting out more HP and torque you are going to have to manage the extra heat that extra HP and torque are going to create. On your trip east you did it at a time of the year where getting heat out of the heaters is a big issue and not getting rid of excess heat. On your next trip if it is going to be done on a hot summer day you stand a great risk of burning your engine up. There have been hundreds of vehicles burn their engines up heading west on I-80 in WY. The grade west of Cheyenne isn't very much for more than 100 miles but it is consistently on the upgrade. Because it is so gradual most people don't realize how much work is being done under the hood. With ambient temperatures well in excess of 80* you will discover how well your cooling system works and where you can have your foot on the throttle to prevent melting it down due to excessive exhaust temperatures.

I know I would not want to swap an Allison for any stick shift simply because I live in western WA where you are more likely to get stuck in traffic trying to go through Seattle/Tacoma or Portland than trying to go through Los Angeles. Letting Allison run the clutch is much preferred to letting my gimpy left knee run the clutch.

I am glad you are making your conversion uniquely yours. That is what is so fun and different about conversions--there are no two alike.

Good luck and keep us posted as to your progress.
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Old 03-26-2016, 08:34 AM   #176
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Join Date: May 2014
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Excellent work man! The banks is a good option. A few things though. Exhaust manifolds used in ford trucks and the ones on my bus are different. Seeing as how we have almost identical busses, I'd say yours is the same. You'll probably have to do some work to get the exhaust to the turbo. Hypermax offered a kit for vans that had the pipes routed differently and that was the one I was looking at. You might want to check it out if you need ideas.

Since you splurged on a turbo kit, I implore you to buy a pyromoter and oil temp gauge. Those two will be absolutely vital in determining how hard you can be running. Pyrometer because you don't want to burn the valves out of it and oil temp will tell you more about engine load then coolant temp ever could.
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Old 03-26-2016, 10:30 AM   #177
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Does the kit include head studs? If not, you might want to consider them. Pretty cheap insurance.

Sorry, I posted the wrong part. I think this is the correct one.

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/ar...view/make/ford
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Old 03-26-2016, 05:27 PM   #178
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Join Date: Aug 2015
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@Cowlitzcoach. Thankyou for such an in depth thoughtfully worded post. @opus I am definitely concerned about temperatures!! I generally don't ever take my engine over 3k but it is governed at 34, with plenty of room left on the tach. From my research, the IDI used to be run pinned all day in industrial applications and would last comparable durability to the 5.9. Not that I plan on pinning my tach, dropping rpm was the whole point of my brownie box haha! I'm thinking the addition of some powerful electric radiator fans might do the trick, or perhaps a supplemental radiator. Booyah, did you end up doing a turbo? What was your solution? I'm hoping to get the turbo done in a weekend fingers crossed. I know on a pickup application it should only be about a days work. PM me about how you solved the problem.
@crazycal yes I ordered a stud kit with it because I want the ability to run high levels of boost in the future. I will also be intercooling the turbo. Here's me, waiting for the UPS guy like a kid waiting for Santa! Haha
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Old 03-26-2016, 05:30 PM   #179
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Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Oregon
Posts: 156
Year: 1984
Coachwork: International Harvester
Chassis: S1700
Engine: 6.9l IDI
Rated Cap: 27 (adults)
Also I have a blown 6.9 that came out of a 1984 350 super duty, it's attached to the 5spd, still in the truck, so perhaps being that it is from a ford application I can harvest some parts to expedite my turbo installation
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Old 03-26-2016, 06:13 PM   #180
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Famousinternetjesus View Post
I'm thinking the addition of some powerful electric radiator fans might do the trick, or perhaps a supplemental radiator.
I'm thinking no on electric fans. I think supplemental radiator would be the ticket. Or just a thicker or bigger radiator.
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