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Old 09-07-2005, 10:23 PM   #1
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Becuase the chance of it getting wet is high in a bus I would use plywood. Also make sure the plywood is exterior grade. Buses get wet weahter it is condensation or a spill/leak.
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Old 09-11-2005, 06:13 PM   #2
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I second that motion. The price differential between the OSB and the exterior grade siding is not that great, and for the peace of mind that comes with it, you will not regret it in the long run. I used 3/4" pink styrofoam insulation under 3/4" plywood, and it makes a HUGE difference in the interior noise level (of course, it cuts 3/4" out of your headroom), and on top of the foam I put a vapor barrier of 6 mil poly sheeting that ran up the sides of the walls about 10".

Over time, you will have plenty of things to worry about with the bus, but having your floor delaminate and get sloppy probably won't be one of them if you use the ply.
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Old 09-12-2005, 02:38 PM   #3
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Here's how I did it http://www.skoolie.net/gallery2/album13. You can certainly do it differently. This has worked well, so far. I ended up priming the wood and putting down self-adhesive tiles. Oh, yeah, if you get exterior sheathing like I did, and if you are putting down some kind of vinyl tile floor, you will have to go around and fill in all the irregularities in the wood with wood putty...and then sand them smooth. It might be better to go with B/C sanded plywood, since I know I spent at least $20.00 on wood putty, and that spread over the cost of the 8 sheets of plywood that it took to cover my floor almost makes up the difference in the cost of the better grade of wood...plus the TIME AND ENERGY you save. If you put down something like a laminate floor, you can skip the wood putty step, but that flooring has its own, different issues.

I put down self-adhesive vinyl tile. It is working...okay... It has issues with expansion and contraction. I used it because it was cheap (36cents/foot), but after I got it down, the sunlight caused it to expand, and forced the edges of the tile together, which caused them to buckle and bubble up. Sheet vinyl would have been better. After I put the tile down I read the directions: "do not use in sun-rooms or on floors that exceed 85 degrees...". Of course, that means my hot water floor heating system is probably going to cause me problems. As long as I keep the sun off the tiles, they stay down, but if some sun hits them and warms them, they show some evidence of lifting. It's not TOO bad, if it only happens briefly, but if I leave a shade up and they really get warmed up, I have to go around and roll them down with a rolling pin. Sheet vinyl would not behave that way...I don't think. It would expand and contract, but not in the same way as individual vinyl tiles.
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Old 10-08-2005, 08:56 PM   #4
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Has anyone thought of putting insulation under the floor?..as in on the outside and then sealing it off with a simple fiberglass panel?..seems you get two great things, or is it three?..one you get the warmer floor, two by covering the beams with the fiberglass sheets its a lot more streamlined under there, which would imply better mileage...and three for us tall people no loss of headroom.
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Old 10-08-2005, 11:29 PM   #5
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Some buses have $prayed on foam on the underside from the factory. I would worry about fiberglass getting wet and rusting the frame. Not to mention the extra weight if it got wet.
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Old 10-09-2005, 09:54 PM   #6
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*LOL* sorry..I was thinking of the solid fiberglass panels....not the insulation stuff. I have a place near us that makes cani rides and could get a lot of scraps for nothing or next to it, and I have worked there before as well so I do know how to make several pieces into one larger piece.
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Old 10-09-2005, 10:07 PM   #7
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Ok I got ya. Seems like it would work as long as you can still get to the underside for service.
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