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Old 05-29-2015, 04:30 AM   #171
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Maple Ridge BC Canada
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Year: 1998
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Chassis: TC2000 Rear engine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timelord View Post
Ospho works well. Turns the rust black, prepares the surface for priming.
Thanks for reply....


Anyone else? Any real stories????
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Old 05-29-2015, 08:36 AM   #172
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I have tested and used a product called "Restore" by Quest Chemical for many years on the rebar armatures in my cement sculptures. Great stuff. It is a tannic acid based compound that converts the surface oxides into a stable, organic compound. Different chemistry & process than Ospho and other products. It also contains a very tough polymer than rises to the surface for added protection. To my knowledge, it is the only such product that is rated as a final finish.. All the others I have seen are rated as a primer only and require a coat of paint to get the full benefits.
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Old 06-01-2015, 12:14 AM   #173
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Year: 1998
Chassis: TC 2000 bluebird
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Rust

I just spent the past three weekends dealing with all the rust from the rear axle back on my 1998 bluebird tc2000FE.

I used two different needle de-scalers on any heavy rust and then flap discs to smooth the surface and remove any loose paint left over. Then an air die grinder with a knotted wire brush to get in cracks and crannies. I coated every surface when ready with rustoleum rust converter. Then a coat of rustoleum gloss black paint. Most of the rust was on the frame. And the rear air tank used for the rear suspension. I replaced all the body hold down clips as they were heavily rusted. I have seen too many photos of bus accidents where the body was thrown off the frame. I had to deal with this before mounting the rear water tank. The rear of the bus had the most rust. The body was heavily undercoated and has fared very well.
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Old 06-01-2015, 04:35 PM   #174
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miltruckman View Post
I just spent the past three weekends dealing with all the rust from the rear axle back on my 1998 bluebird tc2000FE.

I used two different needle de-scalers on any heavy rust and then flap discs to smooth the surface and remove any loose paint left over. Then an air die grinder with a knotted wire brush to get in cracks and crannies. I coated every surface when ready with rustoleum rust converter. Then a coat of rustoleum gloss black paint. Most of the rust was on the frame. And the rear air tank used for the rear suspension. I replaced all the body hold down clips as they were heavily rusted. I have seen too many photos of bus accidents where the body was thrown off the frame. I had to deal with this before mounting the rear water tank. The rear of the bus had the most rust. The body was heavily undercoated and has fared very well.
So I will be in your shoes soon......

As I understand if you have just a bit of rust(which is an iron hydroxide) you can simply convert it into black iron oxide and paint it over.

In my case just like in your I have heavy rust and it musy be removed completely or to convertable thin layer.

To remove heavy rust you can mechanically remove it or use some chemicals to remove it.

Did you try any chemicals to help to remove rust?

On flat surface it is easy to remove rust mechanically but considering frame shape it is a real PITA....
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Old 06-02-2015, 12:16 PM   #175
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Vlad,

I have been working on machinery for many years and have found rust removal chemicals to be a waste of time. I usually remove the heavy rust with a Descaler then grind or wire brush the rest off with an angle grinder. The knotted/twisted brushes and flap discs work the best. To get in the tight areas an air die grinder with a twisted coarse brush works well. Sand blasting is a bad idea as it drives sand into all the moving parts causing accelerated wear and contaminating anything it gets into that is lubricated or has moving parts. You typically have to pull more apart than you had planned or wanted to, to get at all the rust. For example, I pulled the rear air tank and disassembled the air suspension valve bracket and linkage to get at all the rust behind the axle. And those body mount clips run only about $8(us) ea. so they were replaced.

In the front I pulled the radiator and replaced it, and while I had it out, I replaced the alternator, water pump, front main seal, idler pulley, belts, and rebuilt both AC compressors on the engine. Then I installed a 10" wide piece of channel iron behind that flimsy front bumper and mounted a front receiver hitch.

In the rear I am mounting a 110gl stainless steel water tank and a receiver hitch after reinforcing the rear bumper and replacing the mounting brackets. I can send you some photos of the work in the rear if you would like. An email would be easier as posting photos from my phone is tricky.

Bill
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Old 06-02-2015, 08:36 PM   #176
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By mistake posted on the wrong thread (....I was messing up Sojourner's build with this...)

Re-post:

Would Sand Blasting (...or other media) be an option??
Probably not even costlier than days and weeks with the de-scaler (after all this will cost a fare amount of time and electricity).

Besides "Restore" -you might want to look into the Corrosion-X products.
There is a HD version, that should stick extremely well to the frame.
Corrosion-X is all the rage in aviation!! It creeps into any nook and cranny and sticks fairly well....

Then there is SP-400 Industrial Protection by CRC - I only know the spray cans, but I love the stuff. Goes on fairly well, you can re-coat a few times (let it dry between coats), stays extremely flexible (like a wax) and it is semi-transparent, so you can watch what is going on underneath.
[Note: DON'T use the lighter 350 or 200 versions!! SP-400 is the Heavy Duty thing!]

Corrosion-x also has De-rust products, but I don't know how well these work for heavy rust....

Obviously the main-chore is to get the rust off....

After that you might even just opt for a heavy gear oil - heat it up and spray it on and let dust do the rest!

Cheers,

thjakits
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Old 06-02-2015, 08:44 PM   #177
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vlad View Post
You only drive hours but stay days.... This is why I decided to have such a large (deep) living room area.

Also as I said before I want everyone sit in their seat with proper seat belt while we drive. I don't want chase people while I drive. You never know what can happen next second on the road. Everyone will look into window, or play their tablet, or watch tv, or whatever... If somebody is tired, we will stop in safe place and take a rest.

BTW It will take a few seconds to deploy at least kitchen side and have much more room to move around. I will use hydraulic cylinders and electric solenoids to control slide outs.

Hey Vlad,

I fully agree with your statement above - that's what it is all about, really.

However, you didn't answer my question: Is the bus "functional" with the slides in??
I fully understand, that this is NOT the preferred way to operate The Bus, and you certainly would want to pop out the slides whenever you stop.

My question is geared more like to "undesirable" situations, which you just couldn't avoid:
Traffic Jams (landslide, flood, any number of occasions) - situations you certainly would avoid IF YOU KNEW!

Any situation, where you CANNOT or do not want to pull the slides out.

...is your bus still functional? Can you squeeze through to the bathroom and bed-room? Is the kitchen workable, dito the living room?

OR is there NO WAY to use the bus without sliding out?

Cheers,

thjakits
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Old 06-03-2015, 05:13 PM   #178
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Year: 1998
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Chassis: TC2000 Rear engine
Engine: Cummins 8.3; MD3060
Rated Cap: 84
Rust fighting

Here is my rust fighting project.

Here is a picture of surface that was treated with Evapo-Rust. I put a piece of rag and wet it a few times during 2 or 3 days:



Not much of a difference......

After some research I decided to try the most available chemicals. I wet a piece of rag only once and left it overnight. Here are results:



Not bad at all.

Now what did I use????

Here we go:



It looks very promising, doesn't it?

Another chemicals I will try is Oxalic Acid. It is dirt cheap just like vinegar.

Now I will need to find the way to make them thicken them up, make a gel. Any ideas???
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Old 06-03-2015, 07:34 PM   #179
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Cornstarch?

Nat
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Old 06-03-2015, 08:07 PM   #180
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Pectin is used for thickening fruit jams, jellies, etc.. There's a little bit of a science to it; I guess if the pH is too low then it won't set well. I'm not sure whether it would work with vinegar. Pacific Pectin
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