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Old 12-23-2014, 05:08 PM   #41
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Ya I'm digging the attic, makes electrical/plumbing/ductwork both much easier and serviceable down the road. Got a problem? just pull a ceiling panel down and chase it down. Worse case you might have to pull some bats of insulation out. Also recommend using EMT for as much electrical as possible, or at least a few runs of it front to back, that way you can pull additional circuits later for future uses you've yet to think of. Remember to keep 90 degree bends to a minimum for easy pulls.
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Old 12-24-2014, 02:42 AM   #42
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Interesting idea for the rafters! How much headroom did you lose?Now you'll have plenty of space to run the utilities, insulate, build in some overhead storage, etc.
I still have 90" from steel floor to the bottom of the rafters. The floor will take another 2-2.5" (insulation+ plywood).

The main reason was to avoid fighting with curved plywood..... but extra space for utilities is a good bonus.....

I started insulating the steel roof (above rafters) with styrofoam... what a pita. I wave to cut 3" styro strips and glue them up..... hundreds and hundreds of pieces....
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Old 12-24-2014, 02:47 AM   #43
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Ya I'm digging the attic, makes electrical/plumbing/ductwork both much easier and serviceable down the road. Got a problem? just pull a ceiling panel down and chase it down. Worse case you might have to pull some bats of insulation out. Also recommend using EMT for as much electrical as possible, or at least a few runs of it front to back, that way you can pull additional circuits later for future uses you've yet to think of. Remember to keep 90 degree bends to a minimum for easy pulls.
You just gave me an idea about some removable parts of the ceiling. This will definitely save some time down the road. You never know what else you will want to add later... back up camera, more lights, another camera.... even more lights... solar panels...
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Old 12-24-2014, 04:20 PM   #44
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You just gave me an idea about some removable parts of the ceiling. This will definitely save some time down the road. You never know what else you will want to add later... back up camera, more lights, another camera.... even more lights... solar panels...
Yes, and remember to separate high and low voltage electrical. High voltage won't care, but things like camera wires and cat5 aren't very tolerant of electro-magnetic interference.

When I was wiring my tiny cabin I future-proofed everything. I ran empty hard pipe to every switch location (which was easy since I grouped them to just a couple areas) so if I ever wanted I could intercept all my lighting later for home automation reasons. My switchbanks typically had 1 or 2 empty switches for things in the future. I also ran most of my branch circuits down under the house and back up so I could intercept any circuits in the future and isolate them for whatever reason. Instead of stapling everything tight as I would in a customers home, I left service loops in a bunch of places should I ever need to make modifications. I did something similar with the plumbing wherever possible, running as much as I could under the house instead of inside closed walls so it would be serviceable.

The best thing I ever thought of, which you'll never see in any conventional electrical wire, was a 3 way switch to the bathroom heater from right next to my bed. My girlfriend absolutely loved it, and so did I. When you're waking up in a cold cabin, its a lot easier to get out of bed if you know you can run immediately to a preheated bathroom.
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Old 12-25-2014, 01:33 AM   #45
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Yes, and remember to separate high and low voltage electrical. High voltage won't care, but things like camera wires and cat5 aren't very tolerant of electro-magnetic interference.

The best thing I ever thought of, which you'll never see in any conventional electrical wire, was a 3 way switch to the bathroom heater from right next to my bed. My girlfriend absolutely loved it, and so did I. When you're waking up in a cold cabin, its a lot easier to get out of bed if you know you can run immediately to a preheated bathroom.
This is why after checking a bunch of RVs and trailers I decided to build my own from scratch. School bus is a very good solid platform to build a very custom RV.

We simply couldn't find a good layout for 2 adults and 2 kids. We want to have lots of room, privacy, good large kitchen. Most of RVs are weekend cabins on wheels, but what if you want to stay in it for 3 or even 6 month? Little stupid things and limited space will drive us crazy.

Also I want solar panels, mobile/satellite internet, normal size fridge, dishwasher, washer, drier, normal size water tank, large Lithium batteries, etc
There is no way I can afford to buy all this in manufactured unit and to add all this to existing unit will take more money and efforts than build from scratch.
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Old 12-25-2014, 01:40 AM   #46
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Here is a little update on roof insulation.

Here is poor table saw after cutting a load of insulation:


It is easy to cut polystyrene using a table saw, but you have to be very careful because sometimes it is trying to go on angle and this catches the blade and creates a very nasty kickback.

A little pile of already cut polystyrene 2"x3" strips:


A snowman:
[

Here is an example how to work more efficient:


I made a small table from wooden step ladder and I put 5 strips together and put glue on all of them. Then I stick them to the roof. This way I save a lot of time.
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Old 12-25-2014, 04:52 AM   #47
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Lol, you will be finding little white platic balls for years now, you can always laugh when you find them now and look at that picture ;)
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Old 12-26-2014, 01:56 AM   #48
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[
Nice to see you celebrating christmas in a healthy way

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This is why after checking a bunch of RVs and trailers I decided to build my own from scratch. School bus is a very good solid platform to build a very custom RV.

We simply couldn't find a good layout for 2 adults and 2 kids. We want to have lots of room, privacy, good large kitchen. Most of RVs are weekend cabins on wheels, but what if you want to stay in it for 3 or even 6 month? Little stupid things and limited space will drive us crazy.

Also I want solar panels, mobile/satellite internet, normal size fridge, dishwasher, washer, drier, normal size water tank, large Lithium batteries, etc
There is no way I can afford to buy all this in manufactured unit and to add all this to existing unit will take more money and efforts than build from scratch.
Ya I completely understand where you're coming from. RV's are crap, even some of the really expensive ones. You're right for doing it the right way if you want it to last. I'm really interested to see your slide out construction, please take lots of pics.
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Old 12-27-2014, 03:45 AM   #49
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Slide out box

The weather is not the best right now, so I decided to spend some time inside my garage. I know one day I will need to build slide out boxes and now is a good time to start.

I need 3 slide out boxes. Living room box is 13'x4'x6'(WxDxH). Kitchen one is 13'x2'x6'. Master bedroom one is queen bed plus few inches by about 4' high.

I started from the biggest one. I was thinking about material what to use steel and welds or aluminum and rivets???? Finally I decided to use aluminum and rivets. I calculated how many angles I need and how much they will cost me and decided to go the same way I did with steel angles. I took few 1/8" aluminum sheets to metal fabricating place and they cut and bent a bunch of angles. I use 2"x2" and 1.5"x1.5" angles for box frame. I used 1/4" solid aluminum rivets.
Here is a pile of angles:


I have 12" sliding Ridgid saw I bought an aluminum blade. This was a very good idea because it cuts aluminum very fast very accurate (especially 45 degree cuts) and clean.


The longest angle I have is 10' long but I need almost 13'... not a problem just added extra angle behind:


Here is front wall frame :


One of the corners:


Window framing:



I plan to have 4 vertical windows in front wall of the living room slide out. Here is one of them. It is double glazed RV window:


I ran out of screws for windows framing. I hope to finish this front wall tomorrow....
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Old 12-27-2014, 06:24 AM   #50
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Looks good, how will slide work?manual,crank,electric or hydraulic?
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