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Old 08-01-2013, 01:54 PM   #31
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

Pop the cork! We have plates! I didn't get it put on the road right away because it is expensive and just not worth the cost while we work on it, especially since we do not have seats for the kids yet, but we can get it done at any time which feels really good.

It almost went sour when the woman said that they needed proof of the conversion but then I said "but it is already registered as a motorhome and does not have seats and could not be registered as bus" and then the girl she was training asked her a question and then the conversation stopped there. *swipe brow*.

As long as we put it on the road within the year, the inspection is good so I giving myself that as a deadline...

Oh... and the decision to keep the TransAir or not has been made for me. During the inspection it was seen that part of the Air conditioner components are being held by twist ties under the carriage and there was a broken belt and few other things that they could see right away. I was on the fence any way so it just tipped me over. I would really like to have the space they take up and If we want air conditioning I would rather have something that would work when we are stationary also.

now to get to work!!! OMG!!! What have I gotten myself in to
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Old 08-01-2013, 01:57 PM   #32
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

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Originally Posted by paxye
now to get to work!!! OMG!!! What have I gotten myself in to
A lot of fun and challenges!! Enjoy.
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Old 08-01-2013, 02:05 PM   #33
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

LOL!! Yup, what he said. You will have fun. It's an incredible adventure. And that is sorta cool about the a/c units. It's nice to have some decisions predetermined. You may be able to make some money off some of the components. Most importantly, congratulations!!!
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Old 08-01-2013, 06:44 PM   #34
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

Congrats!! You must be very relieved, and excited!
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Old 08-02-2013, 06:39 AM   #35
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

good to hear!
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Old 08-02-2013, 03:11 PM   #36
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxye
Pop the cork! We have plates!
Congrats. A suitable end to your harrowing trip of getting the bus home.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxye
now to get to work!!! OMG!!! What have I gotten myself in to
Yeah, I know. But it's a great, creative endeavor. I expect that you're in for plenty of enjoyable work and then some time enjoying the fruits of your labors. Best of luck!
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Old 08-02-2013, 03:17 PM   #37
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

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now to get to work!!! OMG!!! What have I gotten myself in to
Think of it more as heavy-duty, exhaustive and labor intensive play....somehow it is less daunting when you are "going out to play" than "going to work on the bus"
See how that just feels better? It is a matter of perspective.
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Old 08-14-2013, 02:28 PM   #38
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

So we finally made a bit of progress on the bus! Though I am at home with the kids and could potentially be in the bus every day... well.. I have four kids so it makes it really hard to be out there at times. So it was going very slowly getting the back wall out. I was using the drill + cold chisel and hammer to get at the rivets...




The kids worked on getting screws and the multiple hooks that were everywhere in the "garage" part of the bus...





even the little one was helping...


This weekend after spending about an hour on the bus on rivets and having trouble with them I decided that an air compressor and an air chisel would be a good investment. My mom and an old friend came over yesterday and while my mom watched the kids I headed out to the bus with the friend and together we made quite a bit of progress.

First the wall came out... I had gotten most of the rivets out by hand and he had goffed when I said that they were not easy and that was the reason that I had gotten the air chisel but he soon realized that I had said that for a reason. Even with the air chisel they were hard to get out.

So I decided that an air compressor and an air chisel would be a good investment with all of the rivets that I have to take out.

Yesterday my mom came over with a friend and while she watched the kids, Michel and I went into the bus and worked. The air*compressor*was a great buy. I had done most of the rivets in the wall already so after getting the wood frame the previous owner put in we were able to start taking the wall apart. We had a few rivets left where I was having trouble getting to with the drill or with the cold chisel but the air chisel makes it much easier but only if the rivets are previously drilled.

Here is Michel taking out the last of the rivets with the air chisel.



The wall was able to come out after that.




Here is the framing that was in the wall which I will be able to reuse. The wall was also insulated.



The boys had already gotten most of the screws out of the back portion so after the wall was out we started getting that part of the flooring out. Because that portion of the bus was for baggage etc with holes made by the baggage hooks it was an easy place for water to infiltrate and the floor in that section was soft and I knew the plywood was rotten.



The plywood was a pain to get out. Luckily with it being wet some of the flooring was easy to peel off but where it was still dry it was completely glued down. Also because the plywood was swollen and moldy and the screws were buried and rusted. Some screws we were able to unscrew, some we could no find at all and many broke.



We finally did get it out though.

I was looking forward though to seeing the steel underneath to make sure that was still in an acceptable condition and honestly it really isn't that bad. The rust is concentrated around the spots that *had the baggage hooks but it is surface rust only. Where the plywood was a bit more dry, the floors were still nice.



In the picture above you can see the floor rails a bit out. We got a bit of the flooring up and the plywood is dry and still in great condition and the floor is GLUED down and it will be a pain to get up and I have a feeling the floor will look good.

Though the friend that was over was so much help I found it a bit hard because he besides that back section that was visibly rotten, he doesn't get why we would pull up the rest of the flooring if it is dry or pull out the walls to re-insulate. I get that it is a lot of work but I hate having to explain my reasons and then doubting myself... now I am wondering again...

Next on the list:

Continuing the floors
Figuring out how to get the heaters out (one or more)
Starting on the top luggage racks/ducts and getting the air conditioner out.
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Old 08-14-2013, 02:39 PM   #39
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

Looks like an official bus project!! In my opinion the main reasons to pull the floor out are to treat any rusty areas and to be able to properly insulate the floor. My floor was in good shape, like yours, but i still found a couple rusty spots I was glad I exposed. Actually had to weld in a random patch by one of my wheel wells, as I recall. I reused a lot of the wood for platforms, etc.
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Old 08-14-2013, 04:03 PM   #40
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

Pulling up the floor is a miserable job, and whether or not you do it depends on how thorough you want to be, and how important it is for you to have peace of mind that you know what is going on down there. If you pull it all up, you may find that there is not a bit of rust in the other areas, or... you may find some surprises you will be glad you found. I suppose you could take the perspective that during the time you will own the bus, any rust that may be hidden in there will not reach a critical point. I personally cannot stand the thought that my vehicle might have hidden rust. But then I'm kinda OCD in that respect. If you do decide to continue, you might consider bigger pry implements. The most useful tools for me doing that job was a large cold chisel with hand guard, sledge hammer, and 5 foot steel pry bar:
1. Hammer chisel in between metal and wood
2. Shove in pry bar and lift
3. Wedge something in to hold tension
4. Shove in pry bar again, and lift
5. Repeat


The trick is to get big pieces to come up at once, rather than having it just splinter. But that may or may not happen for you.
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