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Old 09-20-2013, 04:52 PM   #51
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeC
The ceiling... I left the ceiling in my bus for those very reasons. Is removing it and reinsulating the best? Probably. Is it worth the work? Maybe. For me, though, it wasn't. I coated my roof with bus-kote to keep it cool, I plan to apply 1/4" luan (as a sub-ceiling to go around all the ribs screw heads, etc...), and then cork to my ceiling for aesthetics and an additional thermal/sound barrier. I have 0 regrets on not removing my ceiling. As for the holes? Just a dab of latex caulking will do the trick for aesthetics. You'll barely see them once the bus is done, and you can absolutely paint the ceiling or finish it with another material.
This is where I disagree with JakeC.

The main reason people remove the ceiling and floor is to see if there is rust and mold to correct before building out the interior. I found a lot of mold behind the insulation in my roof and along the sides of the bus. I'm fixing the leaks and re-insulating. But it is everyone's choice.
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Old 09-20-2013, 05:35 PM   #52
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

It's all good FWIW, I have a fancy ozone blaster machine which destroys all mold. Gives me a little extra piece of mind And the bus-kote does a lot to seal, as well.

Edit: I've been thinking more about this. Intended usage and amount of work you want to put into the bus may come into play. I am not considering this my permanent bus. This is my learning curve and the one i figure out what we need on, once we start using it. My goal is to use this one for 5 years. My permanent bus will be a H3-45 Prevost to convert If this was my permanent bus, i likely would be building it exactly like William.
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Old 09-21-2013, 07:59 PM   #53
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

I removed two ceiling air conditioners from my vehicle and it's not necessary to bleed off any coolant. All the pressurized coolant is contained in the roof section and there is no plumbing between the upper and lower sections.

The inner controls and vents come off first and this is fairly easy and straightforward. Four small screws hold the inner cover and once the cover is off, the exposed electrical connections can be accessed. Also, there are four very long bolts that connect the inner section to the roof section. These four bolts are the only mechanical connection holding the roof section on the bus (apart from the adhesive on the weatherstripping around the square opening). Essentially, the roof is sandwiched between the two parts of the air conditioner.

Make sure you have turned off or disconnected the power supply to the AC before opening the small box that contains the wiring. There is also a standard connector between the two sections that sends power to the fan and compressor on the roof.

Once the inner parts are removed and the wiring disconnected, the roof section is fairly easy, if somewhat cumbersome, to remove. Carefully pry it up from the roof (the weatherstripping may be tough to loosen) and lift it straight up out of the hole. It's heavy, so use two people to lift it and be careful when you lower it to the ground. You don't want to fall off the roof.

The opening is a standard 14" square and you can put in a Fantastic Fan or similar ceiling vent system, or just cover it with sheet metal. I attacked one of my holes with a reciprocating saw and made it big enough to install a roof access hatch. If you think about doing something like this, contact me for some tips that you should know before you begin.

For what it's worth, I sold both of mine to someone on craigslist. They had been either on the roof or in storage unused for over two years. The buyer called me the next day to say both of them were blowing ice-cold air within minutes of being installed in his project vehicle.
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Old 09-21-2013, 09:49 PM   #54
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

Thanks for the detailed description but I don't think that we have the same AC units.
What we have is the stock Trans-Air Units that came with the bus. You can see the fans on either side of me in the following picture... and everything goes down to the compressor etc that is under the bus in its own compartment.There is most likely coolant that goes through the pipes under each of those units (right under the fans in the picture along the wall)

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxye

Still debating about the ceilings... we want this to be our home for a while, so I am leaning on the side of taking them down... but the work involved... yikes!

so.... many.... rivets...
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Old 09-21-2013, 10:34 PM   #55
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

Hey look on the bright side. Working above your head for all that time will build you some very sexy shoulders, at least that's what the guys said when I was done.
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Old 09-22-2013, 01:10 PM   #56
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeC
Edit: We homeschool our 4 children as well. We aren't die-hards, as we kind of give our kids the option to either be home-schooled or go to public, but they have all chosen to be homeschooled, from my 8yr old to my 15yr old. We like to be spontaneous and this fits our lifestyle wayyy better. Once the bus is done, my goal is to shift my job so that I can do most of my work remotely. You'll have a tough time pulling us off the road at that point
I kind of wish that would ould give the kids the choice but for where we live it is unrealistic because once in the system, it is hard to do your own thing and we are unschoolers.

We have been tired of the house and job rut with a long commute and still living paycheck to paycheck. Sadly, or not sadly as hubby hates his job, he can not do it remotely... so he will need to find something... I can't wait to be on the road and being able to pick up an go. I don't have much of a local community but with unschooling I have many connections that have welcomed us with open arms to come spend time with them once we are on the road.
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Old 09-30-2013, 03:39 PM   #57
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

So I was about to post a question in another section and was about to say something very telling of me. I tend to overthink things and I have reservations of just jumping in at times. I I wrote that, I could hear myself telling myself that I can change that if I wanted to. I see that it holds me back at times. So instead of pressing submit, I went into the bus and decided to take another look even though I have been staring at it for weeks while we do other things.

So I was faced with these... ducted luggage racks.



There are Rivets holding the front... (out in this picture)

But then there are rivets in the back which are in a space that are too tight for my tools. Even with the front rivets out, it doesn't bend enough to get in that space.





So I was going to ask if anyone had done these before and if anyone had tips...

But then I decided that I should just go and try again.

I had taken the rivets out from a bottom seam and I had pried it open but not too much...



So I got in that seam and just pulled.



and continued to pull...



And pulled more...



Now I have a much clearer picture of how I am going to get these out. I am still wondering how I going to get to the back rivets but now I have more options.

Sometimes, you really do just have to jump in....
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Old 09-30-2013, 03:57 PM   #58
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

I have two words for you: angle grinder. Let the sparks fly man! That thing will be down in short order.
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Old 09-30-2013, 03:59 PM   #59
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

see picture

I would try to save the metal shelves and the brackets for re-use
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File Type: jpg rivets.jpg (142.6 KB, 307 views)
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Old 09-30-2013, 04:02 PM   #60
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Re: A hippie with a not-so-minivan

Well done!! That is probably how I would have started. And yes, get as much weight off as possible, simply to make them easier to work with, and then break out the angle grinder. Done deal.
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