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Old 03-06-2010, 12:10 AM   #21
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Re: Bailey Bus Bunedoggle

Quote:
Originally Posted by Iceni John
... Most dump stations are set up for RV poo tanks on the left sides of RVs, generally towards the rear of the vehicle...
In our current campground, our dump is pretty much under our RV, and the water hook up is on the right side of the site. We've been in campgrounds that had 2 sites sharing the hookups, so one is on the "wrong" side. I've been in campgrounds, rest stops and truckstops that had double dump station lanes set up to handle RV dumping on the left side and RV dumping on the right side.

Putting dump valves on both sides would be a nice, handy idea.... Adding a macerator pump would also be a very nice idea.
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Old 03-06-2010, 12:11 AM   #22
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Re: Bailey Bus Bunedoggle

Quote:
Originally Posted by lornaschinske
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iceni John
... Most dump stations are set up for RV poo tanks on the left sides of RVs, generally towards the rear of the vehicle...
In our current campground, our dump is pretty much under our RV at the back end (we have 2 sewer hoses connected together to reach), and the water hook up is on the right side of the site. We've been in campgrounds that had 2 sites sharing the hookups, so one is on the "wrong" side. I've been in campgrounds, rest stops and truckstops that had double dump station lanes set up to handle RV dumping on the left side and RV dumping on the right side.

Putting dump valves on both sides would be a nice, handy idea.... Adding a macerator pump would also be a very nice idea.
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Old 03-06-2010, 09:28 PM   #23
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Re: Bailey Bus Bunedoggle

Busy day today. The weather was great and I took advantage. I got the windows covered and insulated on one side. Tweeked the bed framing a little. Welded together a new floor where the wheelchair lift used to be and removed the hydraulic pump.

I'm happy with the way the windows came out. Tomorrow I'm covering one more on this side and 5 windows on the other side.

Here's a photo of the windows:
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Old 03-06-2010, 09:45 PM   #24
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Re: Bailey Bus Bunedoggle

I was pondering how I would hold the sheet metal in place while I drilled and riveted it. I decided I would screw a couple angle brackets to the bus to hold it in place. I figured it was worth adding four small holes to make sure the window covering came out right.

I put silicone on all the flat surfaces around the windows then pushed the sheet metal up under the eyelid over the windows. Then I could just set it on the brackets and push it against the pillars. My wife drilled the holes from the inside while I pushed on the outside with a section of 2x4.

Then I pop riveted it in place with aluminum rivets.

Afterward I removed the brackets and put silicone in the holes the put the self tapping screws back in.

Here are the brackets before I removed them:
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Old 03-06-2010, 09:53 PM   #25
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Re: Bailey Bus Bunedoggle

iI was going to use some foam insulation I got at Lowes for the insde of the window, I think it's 3/4" inch thick, but it wasn't think enough. I have some big pieces of 1 1/2" thick styrofoam from a bathroom vanity I ordered. I had saved them from 2 years ago and now I'm glad I did. The fit in the windows perfectly.

After running a bead of silicone around the inside, I put some liquid nails on the sheet metal. Hopefully that will keep it bonded to the foam insulation so it doesn't rattle.

Here's the result:
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Old 03-06-2010, 10:08 PM   #26
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Re: Bailey Bus Bunedoggle

Here you can see my recycled seat frames I used to patch the floor where the lift was. It worked out pretty well. I was planning to put the black water tank here also. Now I'm debating whether to put it on this side or the other side.
The tank can still go here. If it does, I'll weld in a frame to hold whatever tank I end up buying.

When I took out the welder I found that I had left the gas on (DOH!) the solenoid value in the welder leaks so when I leave it on, it empties itself

I swapped in the tank from my beer keg. It's straight CO2 so it's not as nice to weld with as CO2/Argon but it works in a pinch.
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Old 03-06-2010, 10:17 PM   #27
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Re: Bailey Bus Bunedoggle

Oh, and one last thing, here's a great reason to wear safety glasses: While I was cleaning the metal for welding, one of the wires from the wire brush let go. Those suckers are moving pretty darn fast! It lodged itself in the knuckle of my pinky. Afterward I was thinking I was glad it wasn't my eye ( I was wearing my safety goggles). Ouch.

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Old 03-07-2010, 12:22 AM   #28
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Re: Bailey Bus Bunedoggle

Ouch!
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Old 03-07-2010, 10:09 AM   #29
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Re: Bailey Bus Bunedoggle

Is galvonic reaction between the steel of the bus and the aluminum pop rivets a concern?

I love your progress, it is looking good.

jim
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Old 03-08-2010, 09:53 AM   #30
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Re: Bailey Bus Bunedoggle

Quote:
Originally Posted by baadpuppy
Is galvonic reaction between the steel of the bus and the aluminum pop rivets a concern?

I love your progress, it is looking good.

jim
Good question. According to Wikipedia:

Often when design requires that dissimilar metals come in contact, the galvanic compatibility is managed by finishes and plating. The finishing and plating selected facilitate the dissimilar materials being in contact and protect the base materials from corrosion. Harsh environments, such as outdoors, high humidity, and salt environments, fall into this category. Typically there should be not more than 0.15 V difference in the "Anodic Index". For example; gold - silver would have a difference of 0.15V being acceptable. For normal environments, such as storage in warehouses or non-temperature and humidity controlled environments, there should not be more than 0.25 V difference in the "Anodic Index". For controlled environments, in which temperature and humidity are controlled, 0.50 V can be tolerated.

Galvanized steel and aluminum are .25 apart. Additionally, the rivet is mostly in contact with paint and the interior steel. Hopefully I won't have any issue.

In a galvanic reaction the anode is the first metal to corrode. In this case I have galvanized steel, aluminum and whatever steel the bus is made from (presumably some mild steel). The zinc being the lowest index will have the highest propensity to corrode I guess.
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