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Old 10-14-2014, 06:49 AM   #91
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Re: Big Bertha

Awesome pics and work!!! Bus is looking great!!!
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Old 10-15-2014, 11:10 PM   #92
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Re: Big Bertha

Cool bus! I'm also curious about the spray foam!!!
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Old 10-16-2014, 10:45 AM   #93
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Re: Big Bertha

Nice job on the foam! Did I miss what you used? Self sprayed? How many did you use? Brand?
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Old 10-16-2014, 01:23 PM   #94
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Re: Big Bertha

We used Tiger Foam, we went with two 600bd-ft fast rise closed cell kits, which arrived in four boxes, each holding a tank slightly smaller than a 20lb propane bottle. They were heavy, about ~50lbs each. The kits came with a few nozzles, detailed instructions, everything needed to set up and spray except personal protective equipment. For that we picked up what was recommended on the site and reiterated in the instructions - OV+N95 half-mask, extra cartridges, hooded tyvek or equivalent, nitrile gloves, protective goggles. All of that is necessary. The vapors from spraying burn your skin and especially your eyes if you're not wearing goggles. It seems like only large particles are sprayed, but when you look more closely after spraying, everything is covered in a fine mist of hard adhesive particles. My glasses fogged so badly I had to take the goggles off to see, and now my glasses are covered in the stuff.

It's hard to say exactly how much one kit covers, because it's really impossible to spray perfectly evenly, and a lot of it is wasted when you trim. It's really hard to gauge on the spot how much the foam will expand. I tried spraying many light coats, one heavy coat, everything in between and it's just hard all around. I'm sure by the time I'm done spraying the whole bus I will have gotten the hang of it, but by then it will be too late. I may have to buy a smaller kit to supplement if I run out, we'll see how it goes.
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Old 10-16-2014, 02:18 PM   #95
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Re: Big Bertha

This may sound stupid, but is there a reason to not use a "hot-wire foam cutter" to trim the excess down? It seems to me that it would be far less messy than any of the saw blade methods I've seen here, but unsure about flaming nature of the foam.....thoughts? Ideas? Here is a video for a DIY version....
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Old 10-16-2014, 03:17 PM   #96
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Re: Big Bertha

Far and away the best solution --- I've seen it done by a local bus converter. They made their own "knife" using an old train transformer and some piano wire on a pvc pipe frame. No dust, no little beads everywhere, just nice smooth, clean surfaces to build over. And in a fraction of the time involved in just about any other method. Tons of DIY info online for "how to make a hot knife". Still have one I made years ago for totally different use.
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Old 10-16-2014, 03:29 PM   #97
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Re: Big Bertha

Other than the bus ribs are metal and will ground out the hot wire....

Figure that one out and you are on to something.
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Old 10-16-2014, 03:34 PM   #98
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Re: Big Bertha

I tried a hot wire for a bit. It stinks! The smell may go away eventually, but I threw the test chunks away before they stopped stinking. Concave curves are also difficult (ceiling). The grinder makes one hell of a mess, though, so it may still be the better way. On the plus side, you end up with garbage bags of loose fill insulation if you use a grinder with wire wheel! It'd be good for an attic space.
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Old 10-16-2014, 07:55 PM   #99
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Re: Big Bertha

With running boards over the metal ribs, we wouldn't face the grounding issue in such a direct and obvious way. With the hot wire, I mean. We would, however, run into grounding issues with the galvanized stud connectors we used. There are also wires which run close to the trim level in some areas, and a hot wire may prove more destructive than a saw. The wire can melt through vinyl jackets much quicker than the saw can chew them up. We didn't even risk the saw in the problem areas, I used a large flat screwdriver to pop out small chunks.

I think concave surfaces would be difficult with wire. Maybe instead of wire you could heat a hacksaw blade and put handles on each end.

Jatzy, if you took some, I would like to see pics of your hot wire in use.


Exhaust going together










You know, in hindsight, it might have been a better idea to enlarge the existing hole and keep it rear-exit. I'm going to piss off whoever is parked to the left or right of me whenever I run it.








Plenty of room = stress-free wires = peace of mind








This color was advertised as "natural white", but it was more like "unnatural white". It had a sickly greenish hue to it, very fluorescent looking. I returned it and got warm white, which doesn't perfectly mimic warm incandescent, but much friendlier than this.


Wago "lever nuts"
















Kitchen outlets.












Harbor freight epoxy putty




I decided to cement all these fasteners in place. They're wood screws run into metal connectors. Again, peace of mind.












Oven receptacle. There are two outlets for one plug!!! Why!!!




The one below is for the fridge.


This is a beautiful snail.










Starting to look like a jungle in here...


Junction boxes for AC LED modules.

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Old 10-16-2014, 08:21 PM   #100
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Re: Big Bertha

Wiring sucks.


Getting them cleaned up a little bit


















Yep, grandma's rotary dimmer switches.










How to mask receptacles before spraying... stuff a glove over them




Bam! The morning after... it echoes differently!


Nice and fluffy




If you care about anything, remove it from the area.






We are beginning to drill holes for plumbing. This is supposed to give the pilot something to follow all the way through, so if we have to saw from underneath we know we're sawing in the same place.










We looked under the bus, estimated the distance between each floor support rib, estimated exactly where to drill to avoid them, and ended up hitting one DEAD CENTER.


So we gave up and started finishing the bedroom.


Pine, little square drive trim screws.






Shore power. I ordered the wrong one the first time, I got a 50A 125V. Which is a 3-wire. 50A RV receptacles are 4-wire. Live and learn.


Oh, hello


Yeah.














Another awesome snail.












Using Wago ferrules from newark




Don't worry, it isn't bonded to neutral.










One for W/D drain/supply, one for fireplace/fridge ice









Stay tuned.
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