Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-10-2016, 12:07 PM   #101
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 12
To get exactly an 18" drop over 136", you need a 7.6 deg angle. So these cuts would need to be 3.8 deg on either side of vertical.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tippyman View Post
How I plan to notch the frame:

I can't imagine you'll want to or are able to be that accurate so some rounding would be fine. A 7 or 8 deg angle will put the tail 27.4" and 25" off the ground respectively, in case you want to lean toward more clearance or a lower load lip.

I'm curious about the fish plate. That shape looks like it has some thought behind it. I don't know anything about welding in that regard so I would have just made a rectangular plate to weld in. Why the holes, and why the diamond shape?
cdlong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 04:03 PM   #102
Almost There
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: VA
Posts: 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdlong View Post
I'm curious about the fish plate. That shape looks like it has some thought behind it. I don't know anything about welding in that regard so I would have just made a rectangular plate to weld in. Why the holes, and why the diamond shape?
It's not my design. I did research on it and that's how the majority of welding websites did it. You want rounded edges to eliminate stress points. The holes are to allow plug welds for extra welding surface. Maybe Jolly Roger can chime in.

Anywho, thanks for the help with the math!
Tippyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 04:17 PM   #103
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 12
I figure it was something like that.

No problem, it was 5 minutes in AutoCAD.
cdlong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 04:50 PM   #104
Bus Nut
 
Jolly Roger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: North carolina
Posts: 602
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Ford
Engine: Detroit 8.2
Rated Cap: 60 bodies
Good afternoon, got home early today. The plug holes are a deffinet and I would recommend 1" minimum holes to allow you room to create a circle the plate/then fill the hole in and just because you have a wire welder don't Meen you can just fill the hole do overlapping beads until you get down to a 1/8 as the wire manufacturer's spec says what that wire will cover. The holes in the plate is because even after you weld the plate the weakest point in that plate is in the field/towards the middle of the plate so you drill(pop holes with a torch) to help secure the middle of the plates but you don't want the welds in the same plane as the frame if that makes any sense to you. Fish plates.
I am not the welding society but I would use a solid piece of steel thicker than what the bus frame is and cut for the angle of the dangle you need at least 4-6 minimum overlap of the frame reconstruction welds and use plates that match the frame minus a little shy width wise if needed. My bus frame has rounded edges on the channel iron frame if yours does cut your plate just a little shy to fit the rounded edges and( just cause I am a pressure piping welder) especially with wire until you can really get used to it I would reccomend 2weld passes on each weld 1 that is smaller not shorter to get into the root of the two pieces of steel and one to cover the first and if you want a third to flush everything out then it can only help.
Even my best welder's in a shop situation with a mig/tig setup will do 3 passes (root,hot,cover) but that is all we know with the ARC we do daily. Even trailer axles that I have done I was taught to drill a hole all the way through the spindle sleeve about 3" in from the end of the spindle and weld them solid a little during to help true the spindle and after to make them solid and we have lost many a rim and tire but never an axle.
I can agree with rounding the corners of the plate but is only because the welder can keep moving in his position instead of having to stop and reposition (which traps slag,air pockets) in the weld unless you clean and grind everytime you stop.
More important Tippyman I don't know what your welding skills are but the bests of the best always weld UPHILL or into the weld. Not downhill or away. That always traps slag and air pockets into any weld unless your experienced and know to look for it and back up and cover each little thing.
I am not the welding society and these are just my opinions and advice.
DO NOT WELD ON HEAT TREATED STEEL AND IF YOU DO ASK FOR ADVICE AND DON'T TELL YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY YOU DID IT.
Jolly Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 05:11 PM   #105
Bus Nut
 
Jolly Roger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: North carolina
Posts: 602
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Ford
Engine: Detroit 8.2
Rated Cap: 60 bodies
Tango, give me a little more info on what exactly you want to weld on? I have a grandfather in law in ROBSTOWN/corpus that retired as a welder from the oilfield a while ago and he grew up with the era of vehicles. A little info. A phone call from me. Maybe I can get y'all together or at a minimum I can gat advice (tough man to deal with ) but he likes me everytime I talk to him cause of my welding skills and the first time we met years ago he took me into his full shop to see if I could weld and he has always asked to talk to me when we/they call even though I am in N.C.
Old sidewinder close to you that can weld anything.
Give me a little more info and I will ask for advice and either send you his address and number or respond myself
Jolly Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 11:40 PM   #106
Bus Geek
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 5,315
Year: 1946
Coachwork: Chevrolet/Wayne
Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
Rated Cap: 15
Thanks Jolly --- Biggest problem is I have no idea what the steel is like. I've been told that the older frames are not heat treated and are meant to flex a lot. Was also told that welding could harden the work area and cause cracking due to heating and rapid cooling. Another chap recommended preheating, welding, then a long controlled cool down. Kinda' like what you have to do with cast iron on old axles and such. That should work, but only if the metal has not been heat treated. If it is (was) heat treated, then the the heat, weld and quick cool with oil trick ought to work. as far as I can tell.

But since I can't seem to find any info on the metal, I am stuck at just guessing. Not a good idea when it comes to something like the frame I don't think. Really need to figure out for sure what the steel is like before going any further but have had no luck nailing it down.
Tango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2016, 05:07 PM   #107
Almost There
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: VA
Posts: 80
Got my ramps, so I made the groove on the end to slide the ramps into.





Finished up the rear and made it look all purdy.





Got her all painted up:




Wood is mounted! Carriage bolts coupled with nylock nuts make for a hard time tightening them.





Couldn't resist puling the Jeep on the back for a little test fit.





Doesn't actually sit on the extension when all the way on.

Tippyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2016, 10:20 AM   #108
Almost There
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: VA
Posts: 80
Long awaited update! I notched the frame and dovetailed the rear! Went way smoother than I expected. First I cut the body to make sure it wouldn't bind up.




Made a little cardboard triangle and traced it on the frame. Then I tacked on a couple pieces of scrap as a guide for the plasma torch.



Harder to see under the bus than you'd think, so I used an underhood light.



Had a Hi-Lift under the rear to make sure it didn't come crashing down. It ended up lowering down super easy, which was a little concerning considering the Hi-Lift was the only thing holding it up haha. I thought it would take some coaxing to lower.



Chopped!





Made some cool tent pegs haha.



Then I lowered it down until the seam touched. Went way too easy!







Tippyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2016, 11:24 AM   #109
Site Team
 
crazycal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 4,079
Looks good. Just be careful when you are turning.
__________________
I'm hungry!

You Gotta Let Me Fly
crazycal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2016, 02:17 PM   #110
Bus Geek
 
Robin97396's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Willamina, Oregon
Posts: 3,889
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC 1000
Engine: 5.9
Send a message via Yahoo to Robin97396
Nice job. That plasma torch makes it look like a jig saw cut. Need one of those. Nice pics too.

Is the wooden part going to fold up against the back end eventually? I like the way that jeep fits in there against the bus wheel wells.
Robin97396 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.