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Old 12-09-2015, 09:58 AM   #61
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Now if I could just get Crowd Funding for my drinking...
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Old 12-09-2015, 12:11 PM   #62
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We ought to start a club..... or maybe a support group would be better.
Hi! I'm M1031 and I have a bus problem connected to drinking........
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Old 12-09-2015, 03:50 PM   #63
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A t-shirt I've seen-- "My drinking team has a racing problem."
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Old 12-09-2015, 05:16 PM   #64
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sdwarf36,

Yeah! Don't they know racing takes up all the beer money?!?!!? Priorities!!!!!!
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Old 12-09-2015, 08:09 PM   #65
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Priorities: I saw a guy walking off a freeway off ramp today carrying a small gas can in one hand and----------------------






a six pac of Coors in the other! I nearly wet myself laughing.
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Old 12-16-2015, 12:18 PM   #66
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Did some math. If I notch the frame and bend it down until it is 24" off the ground, then use 7' ramps, that gives me an approach angle of 17*. I just calculated the approach angle of the Civic and it's 20*. So I should be good with a reasonable 7' ramp. Not quite sure how to calculate the breakover angle of a trailer, but I can calculate the Civic pretty easily.

Any help Skoolie engineers?

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Old 12-16-2015, 01:05 PM   #67
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Looks very close to the layout in my bus. Pretty sure my ramp door is about 2 feet high at the bottom hinge, 7 feet long and I had no problems backing the Saturn in.
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Old 12-17-2015, 03:26 PM   #68
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Originally Posted by gizmoq View Post
The reason I asked about the dog-nose has to do with weight on the wheels. I have a dog-nose with an extended front bumper where I store all my heavy equipment, tools, and spare tire. This does not overload my front axle but brings some of the weight forward. I'm within a 2000 lbs of the capacity on my rear wheels when the car is loaded and it drives WAAYYY!!! different than when empty.
New guy here, I started thinking about doing a project like what's discussed here and this statement caught my eye. I'd be using this for transporting a 2700lb racecar, and the vehicles Gismoq and Tippyman have look to be around 3500 lbs. That's a lot of weight. Can either of you (or anyone from the peanut gallery) please expand on the driving experience with a car in the back? Is it borderline dangerous, difficult to manage, or just a noticeable difference in weight?

My plan would remove at least 7 rows of seats for the car. I haven't seen any ways to calculate load, but I'd guess they expect at least 2800 lbs in those seven rows of seats. So it seems like I'd be in the clear. Plus the CG of the car would be lower and farther forward than 28 kids sitting in those seats, almost right on top of the rear axle. My initial thought was for a flat bed, which would drop a decent chunk of weight off the back by losing all that bodywork, but it would be nice to keep it enclosed for security and cleanliness of the cargo in the back.

I'm not sure it matters much, but due to the lowness of the car being loaded, I want a front engine bus so I could drop the tail like Tippyman mentioned in post #50. I'm curious what the difference in weight distribution is between the two styles.
Thanks.
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Old 12-17-2015, 05:40 PM   #69
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Well its certianly nothing new-I've seen people doing it for years. And as far as handling-IT HANDLES LIKE A BUS! I've never heard say that as a compliment. Drive accordingly.
Same idea on a smaller scale-I used to have a GMC cubevan-first 5 ft living area + the rear was the home for my dwarf car (1000 lbs) and probably another 800 bs of tools + spares. I had the floor raised to go over the wheel arches-beaver-tailed to the back. 10 ft ramps (back of the van probably 3 ft off the ground) had no problem clearing with 4" of ground clearance.
As far as handling-you could tell the weight was there accelerating, but no real change with handling.
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Old 12-19-2015, 12:31 AM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tippyman View Post
Did some math. If I notch the frame and bend it down until it is 24" off the ground, then use 7' ramps, that gives me an approach angle of 17*. I just calculated the approach angle of the Civic and it's 20*. So I should be good with a reasonable 7' ramp. Not quite sure how to calculate the breakover angle of a trailer, but I can calculate the Civic pretty easily.

Any help Skoolie engineers?
I were an aerospace engineer, does that count....nawwwww.
Here is the calculator I used: Right-Angled Triangle Calculator.
Based on your numbers: 24" high and 84" hypotenuse yields an angle of 16.6* at the ground. I have no clue what you mean by breakover, but if its the center section of your drawing, I need one more segment length (either height or horizontal) to calculate the angle.


My bus was dovetailed by the previous owner. The door hinge is exactly 21" off the ground. The dovetail itself is over 5' long and initially designed to be 3" over the wheelwells. Because my car is soooo loooowww, I have added an approach ramp before the rear door ramp to reduce my approach angle. My angles ended up being 8.7* on the approach ramp, 11.8* on the door ramp, and 13.6* on the dovetail.





Quote:
Originally Posted by Peasant Racing View Post
Looks very close to the layout in my bus. Pretty sure my ramp door is about 2 feet high at the bottom hinge, 7 feet long and I had no problems backing the Saturn in.
If your bus is driveable, you might want to experiment with the car both forwards and backwards. My car's weight distribution is 55/45 (f/r) so its not much difference. Personally, I would never put any more weight behind the rear wheels than I absolutely had to. The front of my bus is already so much lighter than the back when the car is loaded, I store my lawn chairs under the back of the car and my jacks and tools in the front bumper of the bus.



Quote:
Originally Posted by cdlong View Post
New guy here, I started thinking about doing a project like what's discussed here and this statement caught my eye. I'd be using this for transporting a 2700lb racecar, and the vehicles Gizmoq and Tippyman have look to be around 3500 lbs. That's a lot of weight. Can either of you (or anyone from the peanut gallery) please expand on the driving experience with a car in the back? Is it borderline dangerous, difficult to manage, or just a noticeable difference in weight?

My plan would remove at least 7 rows of seats for the car. I haven't seen any ways to calculate load, but I'd guess they expect at least 2800 lbs in those seven rows of seats. So it seems like I'd be in the clear. Plus the CG of the car would be lower and farther forward than 28 kids sitting in those seats, almost right on top of the rear axle. My initial thought was for a flat bed, which would drop a decent chunk of weight off the back by losing all that bodywork, but it would be nice to keep it enclosed for security and cleanliness of the cargo in the back.

I'm not sure it matters much, but due to the lowness of the car being loaded, I want a front engine bus so I could drop the tail like Tippyman mentioned in post #50. I'm curious what the difference in weight distribution is between the two styles.
Thanks.

Not dangerous! I don't believe I've exceeded the gross weight on either axle. Acceleration, braking, and hills require extra attention and preplanning. Difficult to manage: since I've never driven a bus before... everything is difficult, no, it just requires a heightened sense of your momemtum and a bit lighter steering inputs. The weight difference is definitely noticeable.

Most busses list gross weight limitations per axle. Mine is 7000lbs front, 15160 rear. Those numbers were based on 20.5 tires at 50psi and I have 22.5 so I think I'm well within the safe zone. I haven't put mine on an 2 piece scale, yet, but my total weight without the car is 16200lbs.
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