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Old 11-11-2009, 10:40 PM   #91
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Johnny you've been busy... Looks nice and the vent idea certainly looks impressive hope it all works out. How many people you planning on accommodating? I still am looking to figure out the whole bucket seat with swivel thing. The trip from MN to Portland a month ago proved that who ever designed the original equipment for my bus was anally retentive that thing is hard as a rock. Not to mention painfully located just too close to the pedals.
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Old 11-11-2009, 11:45 PM   #92
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Thanks guys. I am really happy with the way it is all turning out. Smitty, I totally agree. When I called and talked with them I was expecting to have to progressively shrink the duct as it went down, but they said not to. In fact they said if I could make it even bigger it would help. The dimensions I am running are the minimum they said I should use. I just didn't want to go any deeper. Seth, I am gonna have 2 people in it full time. One to each bedroom. The plus side on this new design is that I can pull the center wall down when I get married and turn it into more of a regular camper. The storage room in the back is about 5 1/2 feet long. Should be perfect for my work benches, tools, and 4-6 bikes at any given time. So today was a very productive day. I am super excited with it all. Lots of pics for you all to look at. I am just the kind of guy that likes pics I guess. So here it is.


Started the day by sealing all the seams and cracks in the duct. Used a simple silicone.




After that I painted the duct to help seal the wood if it gets any condensation in it. I picked up some color mistake paint at the depot for $3. Gotta love that. Its an ugly tan brown, but no one will see it.




Then I insulated the duct with reflectix. I am out of it so I need to get more tomorrow.




Then I ran some line for my 12v lighting. The duct is a great wire run for the lights.



Here I have installed the first of the two ceiling panels I was able to get up today. You can see the holes cut for AC registers and the wires coming through for 12v lighting.




Here is what I got done by the end of the day. Two ducts completed.





So I am gonna finish two more of the duct sections done tomorrow. I am gonna have to put in a couple more on top of that at the end, but I want to wait till I get the AC installed. I am thinking of getting something to help seal and smooth the outside of the duct. Any ideas guys? I was thinking of using bondo. Its cheap and I know how to work with it. How well would it adhere to the wood? Is there something else that would work better?
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Old 11-12-2009, 12:34 PM   #93
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smitty
Why not luan (you can stain/paint), or some sort of paneling (pre-finished)? You could rip it on a tablesaw if you have one handy. Not sure why you'd need to "seal", unless you mean from staining/discoloring. Body filler would work fine, no adhesion problems, but seems like an awful lot of sanding.
Seal is probably the wrong term. I mean, I want to have the duct work corner seams sealed up tight like any duct should be. I want my air coming through the registers, not the seams. I am just looking at different ideas to make it look nice. I like the luan idea. Would definitely be easier than sanding all that bondo. I am gonna be using luan on the walls, and it would definitely make the job easier and look uniform. Some of the easiest ideas are the smartest. Haha.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pied Typer
What kind of wire are you using for your lighting? Are you going to wire wall switches for the overhead lights or are you going to use the switches on the lamps themselves if they have them? The reason I am asking all these questions is that I am working on designing the electrical system for Birdie, and am concerned about wire sizing to effeciency in materials use.

In the instance you are showing you may want to consider something double insulated so there would be less chance of a chafing issue (on the metal un-insulated staples) creating a fire hazard inside a confined wood box that you couldnt easily get into. It also looks like you may be using 16-2 lamp wire which may not be sufficient gauge for that long of a run on 12 VDC and may overheat and melt the insulation. But that of course would depend on how many watts the lamps will draw on the circuit.

Also, if you are using lamps that have switches on them, and plan to use those switches as opposed to wall switches, you may consider running the lamps in parallel if your wire is sized to handle the run to save you a big ole hunk of wire.... lol but then again, you have the end buttoned up already so maybe not...
The wire I am using is 16-2 but not lamp wire. Its a low volt wire for outdoor use. Its got a nice insulation on it. Its made for use with those solar driveway lights. I am gonna be using this run of lights with the switches on the lights. I am wrapping the staples in a layer of electrical tape to help keep the chafing down. The lights i am using are a 1.5 a light with 12 watt bulbs. So the draw is low. Only 6 lamps will be on that circuit, but they are in 3 different rooms. So they will never all be used at the same time. I am gonna have more that do run off a switch too. But they will be run through the wall and on different circuits.
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Old 11-12-2009, 08:23 PM   #94
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Ductwork looks good! How high are your ceilings & does your head clear the duct?
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Old 11-12-2009, 08:57 PM   #95
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Sweet set up and I like the idea of versatile living space your thinking ahead...
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Old 11-13-2009, 12:00 AM   #96
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Thanks Seth. I would just hate to build it up and have it done nice, then have to completely strip it down to change it up. I like knowing most of the work I am doing is still usable if I change it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ezbme
Ductwork looks good! How high are your ceilings & does your head clear the duct?
Well my head does not clear it. Almost. If I stand up nice and straight my head is hitting. The ceiling was around 6' 1" before. The duct comes in around 5' 9". I am 5' 10"+ so I am just taller than it. But the majority of it is going down along the center wall where it is no big deal to lose headroom. In the living room is where the duct headroom can be a problem. But honestly when I am in the bus I am sitting most of the time. I spend hours a day on a bicycle when I am on the road, so when I am done, I dont feel like standing much. Haha.

Today I got a ton done. But only got two pics for you. The duct work is gonna end up being about 22 feet long. I am waiting to install the front 6 feet of it till after I install the AC though. So today I finished up the back 16 feet of it. I needed to get that done to finish my framing. So I got the the rest of that part of the duct finished. Then I went to work framing. I only have a pic of one section of the framing. Will post more tomorrow. I ended up getting most of the center bedroom dividing wall frame up. Also got the front wall frame put together. I will install it tomorrow. It took forever because I had to account for two doors in it and try and raise the frame around them so there was a better clearance. Its amazing how sturdy the duct work is on the ceiling. Having the frame work tied in with it makes it like a rock. So nice. It also gave me a nice flat surface to mount my frame to. Really like how it is working.





Today I went to the store looking at doors for the bedrooms. I found these accordion doors that I think will work great. You can trim them for height. They are really light. But they seem to be pretty strong and I think they will work really well. Im excited. Will finish the framing tomorrow then install my electric in the walls. After that I get to framing out the beds, building the desk, building the tables over my cabinets, coming up with a door jam, installing a front door latch, installing an AC, installing the rest of my duct work, installing lights......and on and on and on
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Old 11-13-2009, 09:31 AM   #97
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

I dont know about that. I like my go juice. Trying to decide whether to do a slat platform for the beds or just a plywood platform. Any thoughts?
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Old 11-13-2009, 02:50 PM   #98
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Plywood with three supports underneath is cheap, fast & easy. Only 2 cuts on the plywood, 5 cuts on the box shape (2 sides, 2 ends + 1 middle to keep from sagging).

A bed with slat supports doesn't give any advantage unless you need to pack it up into a small space at some later date. Then, having the smaller pieces of wood makes for a smaller package.
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Old 11-13-2009, 05:36 PM   #99
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

jumping on beds is important work and must be done... so i would go plywood and struts
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Old 11-14-2009, 12:03 AM   #100
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Thanks guys. Yeah, I pretty much already had decided the same on the bed. Just wanted to make sure I wasn't off base. So today was a fun one. Finished all the interior wall framing. Really turned out solid.



The two door frames for the bedrooms took a little extra thinking to make it strong, but it is really solid and going no where.





The bedrooms are larger feeling than I expected. Here a shot looking forward from the passenger side bedroom.



I finished covering all the windows that arent going to be in use with the thick mil plastic. Then I started running electric. Just mounting the boxes and running the wires to them. My girlfriends dad is a master electrician and is coming over tomorrow to help me wire her all up. The boxes I am using are the low profile plastic ones. Easy to put up and wire.




All the wires are running into the storage room in the back where they will be hooked into the transfer switch and converter/charger. Its lining up really nice and I am hoping the wiring job doesn't take forever tomorrow.



Now I am going to bed. Lots of work to do tomorrow. Peace out my bruddahs.
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