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Old 12-04-2009, 05:45 PM   #121
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Very nice work! Keep it up! You won't regret going with the 1" R-7 polyisocyanurate. EDIT [I used] 3/4" polystyrene, which only has an R value of 4. I' love to have that extra R3 as Christmas approaches in the mountains of SW Virginia.
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Old 12-05-2009, 01:21 AM   #122
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smitty
Roto-Zip
I've gone through a couple of RotoZips. First one had variable speed and the motor burned out rather quickly. I'm not one to abuse tools and I notice if the tool is getting hot and stop and let it cool, but this was ridiculous. It would start to smoke after 5 minutes of easy wood cutting. Second one was a simple on/off. Used it for all kinds of bus-related tasks. Finally wore out while cutting metal for the water-heater installation (it had done all kids of nice tasks though). The second one lasted a couple of years and some tough jobs. Picked up a replacement simple on/off for $30 refurbished. It's been doing great, if it ever does wear out, I'll definitely replace it with another refurbished model.
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Old 12-05-2009, 09:52 PM   #123
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric von Kleist
Very nice work! Keep it up! You won't regret going with the 1" R-7 polyisocyanurate. EDIT [I used] 3/4" polystyrene, which only has an R value of 4. I' love to have that extra R3 as Christmas approaches in the mountains of SW Virginia.
Thanks man. I am really glad I went with it. More for the heat, not the cold. After getting the insulation in the ceiling and on the walls, I could feel a huge difference the next day working on her in the Florida sun. So if it works that well in the heat, it should keep up the same way with the cold. I am not in the cold too often though. Since I am riding a bike anytime I am traveling in Gracey I try and keep the wheels heading towards the endless summer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by John
I've gone through a couple of RotoZips. First one had variable speed and the motor burned out rather quickly. I'm not one to abuse tools and I notice if the tool is getting hot and stop and let it cool, but this was ridiculous. It would start to smoke after 5 minutes of easy wood cutting. Second one was a simple on/off. Used it for all kinds of bus-related tasks. Finally wore out while cutting metal for the water-heater installation (it had done all kids of nice tasks though). The second one lasted a couple of years and some tough jobs. Picked up a replacement simple on/off for $30 refurbished. It's been doing great, if it ever does wear out, I'll definitely replace it with another refurbished model.
Yah man, they work great. I am really happy with mine. But I will say, I was soooo impressed with that multi-tool I bought. Comes with a few interchangeable heads for cutting, scraping, sanding, and grinding. Used it all day for really precise cuts. I would definitely get one if you can. I picked up a cheap one from harbor freight for under $40. Some people have had bad luck with their stuff, but everything I have gotten there still works great. And if my other option is the Feins model for $400, I am happy with my hf model. haha.
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Old 12-08-2009, 12:21 AM   #124
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

So I got some more work done today. Not as much as I would have liked, but couldnt get out to Gracey till around 3pm. I finished up the paneling and insulation on the center wall that splits the bedrooms.







I was going to just use a simple bead of caulk in the seams of the paneling, but the more I look at it the more I think I am going to use a simple furring strip. Will end up looking better too I think once its all painted. Not sure what widths and depths they sell it in. I want to get the thinnest pine that I can I think. Im thinking like 3/4" by 1/4" or something like that. I was going to run the living room luan horizontal, but have found that luan bends much better vertically, so that is what I think I am going to do. Means more seams, but with the furring strips, it should still look great. I also decided that I wanted to mount the power inverter under one of the beds right behind the power converter and transfer switch. I didn't want to have it out in the open area (would be an eyesore). The problem would be turning it on. So I built a remote switch. I took the inverter apart and built my own switch to mount in the bedroom. Turned out pretty well. Still have to sand the edges of the switch, but I am happy with it.

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Old 12-08-2009, 09:25 PM   #125
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

You might consider the possible health risks of exposure to electromagnetic fields in your design. I plan to try to wire my bus so as to avoid having my bed or other places where I will spend a lot of time near any major electrical components or 120v wiring that will carry significant current. Check out this website: http://www.mercola.com/article/emf/emf_dangers.htm and this one: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/elec ... ields.html, for starters, and decide for yourself. I know a bus is a relatively small space, and so you will likely be close to some electromagnetic fields, but I'd rather be 5 feet away as opposed to having a power inverter 6 inches from my head while I'm sleeping.
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Old 12-08-2009, 09:33 PM   #126
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Quote:
Originally Posted by bikeforthelight
I was going to just use a simple bead of caulk in the seams of the paneling, but the more I look at it the more I think I am going to use a simple furring strip. Will end up looking better too I think once its all painted.
I love this idea! It solves the seam problem, and gives it a "panelled" look at the same time. I made a note for myself to do this with mine when I reach that point.
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Old 12-09-2009, 12:18 AM   #127
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pied Typer
They make "H" shaped molding that is paintable plastic used for that PVC paneling that they use in bathrooms, I dont know if the gap in the "H" is big enough for luan, but it may be cheaper/easier than lathing strips and look just as nice when painted....

Just thinking...
I cant find anything like that. But the wood slats are gonna be easier since the paneling is already starting to go up I think. I actually looked for that stuff before I started paneling, but never found it. Dont think I could install it with paneling already up anyways. Wood will look fine too though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diesel Dan
You might consider the possible health risks of exposure to electromagnetic fields in your design. I plan to try to wire my bus so as to avoid having my bed or other places where I will spend a lot of time near any major electrical components or 120v wiring that will carry significant current. Check out this website: http://www.mercola.com/article/emf/emf_dangers.htm and this one: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/elec ... ields.html, for starters, and decide for yourself. I know a bus is a relatively small space, and so you will likely be close to some electromagnetic fields, but I'd rather be 5 feet away as opposed to having a power inverter 6 inches from my head while I'm sleeping.
I will check out this site, but I know I had the same stuff about the same distance from me in my stock built RV. The power stuff is actually about 2 1/2 fee away, and is gonna be double boxed. If you sleep with your head at the other end its a good 7 feet from your head. Plus, its not under my bed....its under my drivers. So I am not worried.

So today I decided to start taking on the task of installing the first panel that had to be cut along the roof radius. After about an hour of trying to get a template to fit right I decided to make a better way. I had a template made of scrap luan that was sorta close, but not right. I took a marker and taped it to a piece of scrap frame wood.


Then I placed that piece of wood against the ceiling. Now the marker was far enough down to give me a clear mark. So I just slid the marker across the ceiling marking out the template exactly where I needed to cut.


Worked like a charm. After an hour of frustration, it took this marker idea all of 3 minutes to give me a perfect template. I got the front wall up on one of the bedrooms.


This pic looks like the screws are in willy nilly, but it actually is where the frame work is behind it. But you can see the template worked pretty well.


Inside that wall is pink fiberglass insulation. I used great stuff expanding foam in the top section to help provide a stronger backing to the luan up where the frame didn't reach. It also let me seal better the top edge of the panel to the roof of the bus. I also used the great stuff along the top edge of the bus. I have the polyiso foam in the side walls of the bus, but had to notch it for the steel cross beams. So I used a little of the great stuff on all those steel areas that were exposed. Hopefully just a little more thermal break for that steel.


May not do anything, but its better than wasting the rest of the can of great stuff. Haha. Tomorrow I will cut out the excess. I am hoping to start paneling all the side walls tomorrow. We will see what I get done.
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Old 12-09-2009, 12:54 AM   #128
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

In the front area of my bus (living area and dinette) I panelled the ceiling with whitewashed luan. It conforms pretty easily to the curvature. I had already glued the 1/4" foam to the ceiling with foam-safe construction adhesive. I put the same glue on the panels, and pressed them into place, holding them against the curvature with a bunch of improvised braces. When dry, it stayed. Some of it I had to stand and hold by hand for 10 or 15 minutes.

My seams are covered with 1/4" x 2" boards ripped from dimensional stock. Lath, basically. I ran my luan longitudinally along the ceiling. Along the longitudinal seams on the ceiling, the boards are just long straight boards. The boards that cover the end seams of where two long pieces of luan come together are the same 1/4" x 2" boards, but shorter. They are steam bent to match the curvature of the roof. (Ebony stain covered with polyurethane will actually survive the steambending process without harm.)

Steambending is not difficult technically, and doesn't really require much technology to accomplish. Just put a metal coffee can full of water on the grill and boil it. Stick the end of the stick that is being bent into the water, and build a big aluminum foil cone running up as high as you want to bend so that the steam will heat the stick. Any other similar contraption (long piece of pipe with steam in one end for long pieces) will work. You can pour boiling hot water on directly on thin wood 1/4" and get reasonable bendiness out of it.

I made a cieling curvature template out of a 2 x 8 , and then clamped the hot lath to that, starting at the very end, and gradually tightening down several clamps along the length until the wood fit the template. Beware springback. If you make your curve slightly tighter than you need, the spring-back will be more or less controlled -- takes fiddling with, and I didn't actually worry about it. If you get a decent amount of bend in the wood, don't worry if it's not an exact match to the curvature of the ceiling. The wood will be flexible enough that you can push it up against the ceiling and put screws in it to hold it permanently.

I made half lap joints where my longitudinal and lateral trim pieces intersect. The original ideas was to have a simulated wooden beam ceiling, but it didn't exactly look like beams. It looks decent, but it was not the exact effect I had in mind.

There may be pictures in the gallery, but I can't remember.
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Old 12-09-2009, 01:17 AM   #129
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Im gonna go find those pics man. I would love to see em. I am not gonna be bending a ton of luan though. Not putting wood on the ceiling. At least not this year. Maybe eventually I will pull all the metal down and insulate and sheet it. Would love to have the time to do it now, but have to finish this conversion by the middle of january.
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Old 12-14-2009, 07:20 PM   #130
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Re: Bike For The Light Skoolie

Been a few days since I posted on this. I have done some work, but today I really got back into a full day of work. I was trying to figure out what I wanted to do with the top edge of the paneling along the side walls. Didn't want it to just hang there with a rough edge, and there wasn't enough room to install a corner piece really. So I decided to make my own kind of trim piece. I started with a 1" x 3" furring strip. I cut a 50 degree angle on the top, then notched the bottom.



The finished piece mounts to the top of the frame really well and sets against the edge of the metal ceiling.



The notch at the bottom lets the paneling slide right up in there and gives a very clean finished look to it.



The steel ceiling has a slight bow to it between the cross beams. So in those areas the trim piece doesn't fit flush. I used some simple silicone to fill that gap. When its all painted it will look really good I think. The trim piece and the silicone are going to be painted white like the ceiling. The paneling will be a different color. So the bottom of that trim piece is going to leave a straight top edge between the colors. I finished up the side wall paneling in the first bedroom. Using a small trim piece between the panels. I really like the look of it.



Then under the bed in that bedroom I laid carpet to keep it quiet, and help protect anything I put under there for storage as it rolls around and stuff.



I am going to finish up that first bedroom tomorrow so then I can store all my tools and stuff in there as I finish the rest of the bus. Fun times.
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