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Old 03-19-2015, 08:23 PM   #11
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
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Originally Posted by MuddaEarth View Post
I totally recommend doing the raise.....It's not difficult, just a lot of work. Follow my thread if you'd like.....I'm putting together very simple, informative YouTube videos, and also pictures of the process.
I agree. I did a 23 inch roof raise using nothing more than two 5 foot scaffold frames and a few 2x4's.

Lifting it with the scaffold frames required no building special lifting tools, and scaffold is available everywhere for sale and rent. I only needed mine for 2 days, it could have been done in one day. Not that this mattered to me, as being a building contractor I always have scaffold around.

To me a bus is not fit to live in full time without the roof raise. After you lift the roof, you will have room for the following.

- Stand and look out your windows.

- Move your entry door anywhere you like on the bus.

- Move your entry door to floor height. This gains 9 square feet of floor room in your bus.

- Room for proper ventilation. Now heat can escape out the windows before pushing down into the living space.

- Space to install full size upper cabinets for storage space. You can never have to much storage.

- Room to properly insulate the floor and ceiling.

- Space to vault the ceiling. This removes the claustrophobia effect of small spaces. Your living space no longer looks like a square box.

- Room to install counter tops at the proper height without a window in the way. Window bottoms can be raised to 6 inches above the counter top like they are meant to be.

And the list go's on and on.

My thread for reference.
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/th...ime-10138.html

Nat
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Old 03-19-2015, 09:16 PM   #12
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Room to properly insulate is a biggie for a lot of us doing roof raises.
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Old 03-20-2015, 04:36 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
- Move your entry door to floor height. This gains 9 square feet of floor room in your bus.
Is there someone looking to build a bathroom in the extra 9 square feet of space in front of their entry door? That space is a loss unless you remove the door and skin over the opening—you still need to walk through the door to a central alley or hallway.

Unless you build all your amenities on one side with a hall on the other side, like a sleeper car on a train. Then I can see why you wouldn't want to step over or into a staircase on your way fore or aft. Hmm....
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Old 03-20-2015, 05:19 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by PDBreske View Post
Is there someone looking to build a bathroom in the extra 9 square feet of space in front of their entry door? That space is a loss unless you remove the door and skin over the opening—you still need to walk through the door to a central alley or hallway.
.
My passenger seat now sits where that awful front mounted stairwell was.

I can have a nice boot rack, and a flat surface to remove them right inside my door.

Also insulating and running in floor heat lines are all more efficient with out the internal stairwell.

Nat
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Old 03-20-2015, 07:39 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
My passenger seat now sits where that awful front mounted stairwell was.

I can have a nice boot rack, and a flat surface to remove them right inside my door.

Also insulating and running in floor heat lines are all more efficient with out the internal stairwell.

Nat
What I meant was, whether you keep the existing door or remove it and put a new one somewhere else, the space inside the door is still an unusable space no matter if it's in the front corner or halfway to the rear of the bus. Six of one, half a dozen of the other.

Now, freeing up useable space under the bus is another story.
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Old 03-20-2015, 08:05 PM   #16
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An entry over the bed with a fireman's pole to enter. That might save space but I am typing after two many cranberry vodka drinks.
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Old 03-24-2015, 10:48 PM   #17
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Here is a few pictures of the process. We are going to do a roof raise. We really wants to keep all original windows. I have not decided on how high I want to raise would like to leave enough room on the top of the bus for solar panels. If anyone wants to buy a heater core let me know I want to get rid of it.
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Old 03-25-2015, 05:36 AM   #18
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if you pop out the center pins on those rivets they shear off fairly easily with a chisel on an air hammer.
Nice pics. Keep it up.
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Old 03-25-2015, 09:54 AM   #19
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Join Date: Aug 2011
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Year: 1992
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Will you be insulating your bus?

If you are, I would get rid of the original windows. They are made of aluminum and transmit heat and cold really bad. They also leak air like crazy.

The were made so poorly they didn't even do the job in the school bus. Something much better needs to be invented for buses from the factory.

Nat
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Old 04-13-2015, 06:57 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
if you pop out the center pins on those rivets they shear off fairly easily with a chisel on an air hammer.
Nice pics. Keep it up.
found an air chisel in our shop and it made a world of difference. thanks for the info.
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