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Old 02-19-2018, 08:47 PM   #1
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Freedom (1993 International)

Hey everybody!

Just bought a bus a couple weeks ago and finally got around to getting some work done on it. I thought I better start a log before it gets late in the project, and introduce myself to the Skoolie community!

It's a diesel with a DT360 and AT545 4 speed automatic. I've never owned a diesel, so this is very exciting! I learned (through skoolie.net) that it does not have glow plugs. It does have a heater hookup in the front bumper, & after some reading I feel confident about how and when to use it! So cool! I love my new bus!

I have until the end of March to work on it here before I have to move it, with all of my belongings in it, to a new destination to soon thereafter (hopefully) continue the project. \

Today was the first day I did any work on it. I tried to take out the bolts to the seats yesterday and could not get a single bolt out. The nuts were just too rusted to the bolts and without someone under the bus to hold a wrench for me I was unable to get any real leverage. Today I decided to grind the bolt heads all off, and it only took me about 4 hours and 3 grinding discs. Not a bad job at all, and so gratifying!
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Old 02-19-2018, 09:08 PM   #2
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Welcome! You will do fine. Having discovered the easiest way to deal with seat bolts on your own...you are way ahead of the game!
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Old 02-19-2018, 09:15 PM   #3
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Welcome to the site. Looking forward to your build.
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Old 02-19-2018, 09:19 PM   #4
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That's a very centennial looking bus.

Sometimes you can pry the bolts and they'll break too. I think you're done with that by now though.

So what's next? On to floor removal or ceiling and
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Old 02-19-2018, 09:37 PM   #5
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Welcome to the forums!! Love the colors the previous owner choose for the outside.

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Old 02-20-2018, 03:09 AM   #6
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You have a pretty nice looking bus.

The fact it has the green floor tells me that whoever purchased it originally wanted a bus with more than the standard state spe'c bus. You will probably find that there are other extra cost options that will make your bus nicer for your purposes.

If your floor isn't soft I wouldn't bother pulling it up. Under the green linoleum should be at least 5/8" marine grade plywood and it might have 3/4" marine grade plywood.

Later when you have more time you might want to pull it up but short term all you really need to do is stop up all of the holes where the seat bolts went through the floor. I have found clear silicone sealer is a fast and easy short term hole stopper.

The DT360 is a workhorse that if it is treated properly it will go and go and go and go! Just don't get it hot and make sure you keep the coolant pH as neutral as possible. If your bus doesn't have a coolant filter with an additive package go to NAPA and get a coolant additive. One of the important things the SCA additive does is to reduce cavitation which will eat through a cylinder liner faster than fast if it is allowed to continue for very long.
https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/PARHD20016


Good luck and happy trails to you!
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Old 02-20-2018, 05:01 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexor View Post
Hey everybody!

Just bought a bus a couple weeks ago and finally got around to getting some work done on it. I thought I better start a log before it gets late in the project, and introduce myself to the Skoolie community!

It's a diesel with a DT360 and AT545 4 speed automatic. I've never owned a diesel, so this is very exciting! I learned (through skoolie.net) that it does not have glow plugs. It does have a heater hookup in the front bumper, & after some reading I feel confident about how and when to use it! So cool! I love my new bus!

I have until the end of March to work on it here before I have to move it, with all of my belongings in it, to a new destination to soon thereafter (hopefully) continue the project. \

Today was the first day I did any work on it. I tried to take out the bolts to the seats yesterday and could not get a single bolt out. The nuts were just too rusted to the bolts and without someone under the bus to hold a wrench for me I was unable to get any real leverage. Today I decided to grind the bolt heads all off, and it only took me about 4 hours and 3 grinding discs. Not a bad job at all, and so gratifying!
I'm into that paint jobwelcome to skoolieville

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Old 02-20-2018, 09:33 PM   #8
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Thanks all! That's the supportive tone I need to get this thing done!

I tackled the interior paneling today. I took off HUNDREDS & HUNDREDS of T-20 torx bolts. Those ceiling panels were heavy, too! So glad I got all that fiberglass out, 'cause there was some trapped dripping moisture in the walls AND ceiling. I'm actually impressed but the structural integrity of all of the steel framing I have uncovered. This bus is super solid!

That's interesting what you say about the green floor cowlitzcoach. I appreciate your suggestion to leave the floor as is for now, but after seeing the moisture in the walls I have anxiety thinking about what is under that green floor. I don't think there is plywood under there, but I will find out tomorrow. I think I'm going to have to grind off most of the screw heads that are holding it in.

I'm super stoked to have gotten all this done today. It's so nice to be looking at the bare framing. I'm already contemplating between cotton bat insulation or spray foam, since it looks like insulating shouldn't be that far off, unless I decide to raise the roof. Ha!
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Old 02-20-2018, 10:15 PM   #9
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Wicked paint job!
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Old 02-21-2018, 12:17 AM   #10
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You should be able to tell if you have wood under the linoleum. With wood the bolts holding the seat leg down will be almost an inch longer than if there is no wood.

With the seat bolts out and a hole through the floor you should also be able to see if there is wood under the linoleum.

A lot of the buses of the vintage your is didn't have wood under the linoleum but I can't ever remember seeing a bus with the upgraded floor covering that didn't have wood under the floor covering.

As old as your bus is, you might be able to sight down the aisle and see if you don't have wood in your floor. Most buses that only have linoleum over the steel floor will have an aisle that looks like a roller coaster after a lot of years. From all of the feet going up and down the aisle the metal actually stretches between the floor stringers. Which leaves the aisle going up and down over the floor stringers instead of staying flat.

I only suggested that you just leave the floor alone short term so you can get everything packed up and moved out on time.

Taking up the everything that is covering the metal floor allows you to make sure nothing is rusted, it allows you to seal all of the holes from the seat bolts, and as you put it back together you can add some insulation. Without insulation in the floor of a bus the floor can get extremely cold in the winter.
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