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Old 11-10-2015, 06:29 AM   #51
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What kind of primer? If you are using spray paints you need to make sure that the thing you are going to paint and the paint are the same temp. Try a different primer. If that doesn't work try airplane remover, then sand to metal and start from scratch.

Some times certain paints won't stick to each other.
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Old 11-10-2015, 08:57 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainInsaneo
What kind of primer? If you are using spray paints you need to make sure that the thing you are going to paint and the paint are the same temp. Try a different primer. If that doesn't work try airplane remover, then sand to metal and start from scratch.

Some times certain paints won't stick to each other.
Thanks for your thoughts on this. I used Rustoleum Ultra Cover Primer. I wasn't clear about the warm/cool metal temperatures; the paint and metal were always the same temperature, I just tried it alternately on cold and warm days (no difference).

I talked to someone at Napa Auto Parts today, and he suspects there was a protectant applied at some point that's keeping paint from adhering. He recommended sanding down to bare metal, using mineral spirits, and painting with the paint/primer combination. I sanded, and it still bubbled on bare metal. Mineral spirits + etching primer is next.
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Old 11-10-2015, 09:32 PM   #53
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Have you tried ospho?
It etches into the steel pretty well. Works really well on galvanized stuff and helps the paint to adhere.

I'm having wonderful results with Rustoleum Rusty Metal Primer. I use stripper where necessary, then I use a wire wheel and/or friction disc. It then gets wiped down with mineral spirits or acetone. After that the surface is ospho'd twice and then lightly brushed off by hand. Paint sticks to it really well!
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Old 11-11-2015, 07:31 AM   #54
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Originally Posted by EastCoastCB
Have you tried ospho?
It etches into the steel pretty well. Works really well on galvanized stuff and helps the paint to adhere.
I hadn't thought of this, but I have some sitting around and will give it a try. Thanks!
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Old 11-12-2015, 06:44 PM   #55
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Figured it out, here's what worked:

Sand to bare metal
Wipe 2x with mineral spirits
Rust oleum self etching primer
Rust oleum 2x ultra

No bubbling, perfectly smooth. So if you are preoccupied like me with perfectly painting your dash instead of actual necessities like plumbing or electrical, here you go.
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Old 11-14-2015, 03:03 PM   #56
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Going through the bus, vacuuming up the rivets and fiberglass remnants left in the interior walls, I noticed 1-3 holes in each section of the floor behind the chair rails.

I think I remember some threads mentioning this, but I don't remember where and can't find anything with the search function. Are the holes purposeful, for drainage? I had planned on closed cell spray foam for the interior walls, which would have sealed them up. But for a number of reasons, we'll probably use polyiso instead. I'm replacing all the weather stripping in the windows and caulking the corners, so hopefully leaking won't be an issue anymore. Should I seal the holes or leave them?
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Old 11-15-2015, 02:49 AM   #57
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They were drainage holes for the condensation and window leaks.

I'm filling them full of foam, and painting the underside.

Once the void is full, there will be no condensation inside the walls, and my new windows won't leak.

Nat
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Old 11-19-2015, 12:50 AM   #58
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Nat, would you consider those drainage holes to be harmful in some way? The logic that drains aren't needed because the windows won't leak and there won't be condensation in the walls seems reasonable. But if for some unforeseen reason one of those assumptions proved wrong -- the flashing/sealant between the window and body sheet metal is somehow compromised, for example -- it could be disastrous to have the drain permanently closed. Agreed, that's a low risk. But it might not be zero risk. And so I wonder, what's the risk or cost associated with leaving the drainage holes functional? All I'm coming up with is "can road spray work its way in there? What about insects?" But these risks existed for the whole life of the bus and seem not to have created any disasters of their own.
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Old 11-19-2015, 11:19 PM   #59
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There is no way to leave them open and fill the cavity with foam.

If there is a leak, it will find it's way down. You can count on that.

The foam will not stop water from draining.

Nat
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Old 11-20-2015, 05:13 PM   #60
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nat_ster and family wagon, I appreciate you thoughts on this. I will probably fill them with polyurethane caulk, but have been considering this too:

Quote:
Originally Posted by family wagon
And so I wonder, what's the risk or cost associated with leaving the drainage holes functional? All I'm coming up with is "can road spray work its way in there? What about insects?"
I can tell you that yes, after 20 years, some dirt and grime deposited itself on the lower part of the previous fiberglass batting (it wasn't mold, although there was some of that in other places). I'm not sure about insects. Without spray foam to entirely fill the cavity, there will still be a chance that fumes/dirt/insects could get in. Road spray would probably be limited to the very bottom of the polyiso foam, while insects could tunnel through it if they were determined enough.
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