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Old 03-27-2015, 07:26 AM   #81
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
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Thanks for the update. You may want to take a look at gmarvel's build thread. He has a Crown bus, and he insulated on the inside of the interior panel.

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/jo...sion-8600.html

Wolfy
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Old 03-27-2015, 12:42 PM   #82
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
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Year: 1971
Coachwork: Gillig
Engine: Cat 3160
Oh yeah. We have been following the Marvel's build from the beginning. I believe the interior measurements of a vintage Crown are a bit larger than a vintage Gillig. Plus, we will have 6 family members and two dogs living fulltime in this space, so it was important to us to keep every inch of interior space available. There is a big difference between a 12" aisle and a 17" aisle.
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Old 03-27-2015, 12:53 PM   #83
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Thanks for sharing the pics. Progress is good.

Insulating the floor that way will have almost no effect.

You have to separate the metal from the living space.

You will still have thermal bridging, condensation, ect.

How many windows were you needing that it was not affordable?

It's hard to install good size windows, and even harder to properly insulate without doing a roof raise.

Nat
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Old 03-27-2015, 12:56 PM   #84
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Oh, I see. I didn't realize there was that much of a space difference between the Crown and the Gillig. I forget what the interior width of my Crown is, but 7'4" rings a bell. I'll have to confirm. What is the interior width of the Gillig?



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Originally Posted by GilligusMaxibus View Post
Oh yeah. We have been following the Marvel's build from the beginning. I believe the interior measurements of a vintage Crown are a bit larger than a vintage Gillig. Plus, we will have 6 family members and two dogs living fulltime in this space, so it was important to us to keep every inch of interior space available. There is a big difference between a 12" aisle and a 17" aisle.
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Old 03-27-2015, 07:22 PM   #85
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Location: Winlcok, WA
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Make sure that as you build in furniture, cabinetry, and floor coverings that you don't block any of the access panels that go through the floor or at the rear going into the engine compartment.

I can tell you from experience that there is no physical way in which to access the top of the transmission and the rear of the engine if you can't go through the floor or through the front of the engine comparment.

Also, there should be an access to the top of the fuel tank. You need to be able to access that as well. Most probably you will never have to access the top of the fuel tank but sure as life if you block the access off you will have to get into the top of the tank.

Good luck and happy trails.
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Old 03-28-2015, 01:36 AM   #86
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Location: Gonvick MN
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Year: 1975
Chassis: Gillig
Engine: Cat 3208t/10 speed transmission
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Originally Posted by GilligusMaxibus View Post
Hi Alan N, I'm not sure how I missed your post back in February. Sorry about that. Is your Gillig converted? If so, how are your walls insulated? If not, how do you plan to insulate your walls? Will you keep the bus windows?

Do you have a conversion build thread we can look at?
Greetings.
No we don't have a conversion thread. Our conversion was rather hurried and I can't find most of the few pictures we had of the process.
Some pictures on the photo gallery here, look for 75 Gillig.
Our bus conversion started a family joke." Lets go to Alaska in a school bus"
Well long story short we did. Brought the bus home in march, left for Alaska July 3.
The motto was "It's a trip NOT a project!" else I would have a half converted bus in my shop yet.
Not much insulation in the walls as of yet. Just rigid foam in the spaces where we removed windows and some double bubble foil stuff on top of the factory interior and under carpet in the back bedroom.
My plan is to remove the quickie conversion and do it right one room at at a time starting at the back.
The problem is it's more fun to use it than fix it.
My question for you is how are you planing to insulate your roof?
Have you removed the ceiling? If so how?
I have thought about trying to squirt spray foam between the roof and ceiling but have not tried it yet.
I enjoy seeing the photos of your project. Keep up the good work.
Blessings to you all.
Alan
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Old 03-28-2015, 09:58 AM   #87
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Alan N

If you plan on using your bus in Alaska, you need to drop that headliner and do some real insulation. Squirting spray foam between the liner and roof will do nothing but make a mess in there. The cans of spray foam need air to expand and dry.

The headliner should not touch the metal ribs. This is called thermal coupling. You want to decouple the metal ribs from the headliner to eliminate the condensation, heat, and cold transfer.

Alaska is the real deal. If you don't install at least 4 inches of rigid Styrofoam all the way around, you won't be using your bus in winter.

Nat
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Old 03-28-2015, 10:13 PM   #88
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Alan N

If you plan on using your bus in Alaska, you need to drop that headliner and do some real insulation. Squirting spray foam between the liner and roof will do nothing but make a mess in there. The cans of spray foam need air to expand and dry.

The headliner should not touch the metal ribs. This is called thermal coupling. You want to decouple the metal ribs from the headliner to eliminate the condensation, heat, and cold transfer.

Alaska is the real deal. If you don't install at least 4 inches of rigid Styrofoam all the way around, you won't be using your bus in winter.

Nat
Well. Let's see.
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Old 03-29-2015, 11:17 AM   #89
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My bad, I see you only use your bus in summer.

Nice pics, thx for posting.

Nat
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Old 03-29-2015, 02:39 PM   #90
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
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Year: 1971
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Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
Thanks for sharing the pics. Progress is good.

Insulating the floor that way will have almost no effect.

You have to separate the metal from the living space.

You will still have thermal bridging, condensation, ect.

How many windows were you needing that it was not affordable?

It's hard to install good size windows, and even harder to properly insulate without doing a roof raise.

Nat

Why won't insulating under the bus have any effect? We will also have some insulation under the flooring, just not much.

We will be replacing 10 or 11 windows, but will not be using RV windows. We want to maintain some of the school bus look and feel, so will be working within the parameters of the existing window frames. The least expensive custom windows we have found are the ones from Home Depot that Ol Trunt used.

Due to our desire to maintain the structural integrity and vintage style of the bus, a roof raise is not viable for us. At least, not a traditional one. We will be maintaining the original curve of the roofline and will be raising just down the center with possible skylights along the edge. the raise will allow additional storage above and the ability to insulate about a third of the area of the original roof. We will also be adding solar to the roof, but this will all come in another phase.
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