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Old 09-21-2019, 07:32 PM   #21
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Asheville, NC
Posts: 323
Year: 1999
Coachwork: American Cargo 14'L x 7'8"W x 7'H Box
Chassis: Ford E350 Cutaway
Engine: 7.3L Powerstroke
Rated Cap: 11500 lbs
Quote:
Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
Are you going to cut away any of the upstairs deck so you have extra height downstairs?
Or raise some of the downstairs ceiling and put beds above.
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E350 Box Van build
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Old 09-21-2019, 07:35 PM   #22
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Cazenovia, NY
Posts: 108
Year: 1985
Coachwork: Leyland
Chassis: Leyland
Engine: Cummins
Rated Cap: 17500, probably kg
@music: nope. Maximizing upstairs space for beds/office.

@bon: 30.5' long, 8'2" wide, 13.5' tall
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Old 09-22-2019, 01:20 PM   #23
Bus Nut
 
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Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Council Bluffs, Iowa
Posts: 416
Year: 1976
Coachwork: Wayne
Chassis: Dodge S-600
Engine: 360 V8
Rated Cap: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seriousracer View Post
It was supposed to be Wanker spinners not spammers. Damn autocorrect

There's a book that I want entitled, Damn You, Autocorrect! It's full of funny suggestions. Text prediction apps are good for a laugh, too!

Back on topic: that is one gorgeous bus! Not sure how I'd use one, in part 'cause I'm over 6'5 with shoes on. If I had kids, they'd love upstairs bedrooms!

My lady (now deceased) and I liked to imagine our friend's reaction to seeing a really tall bus lumbering onto her acreage. Yours would've fit the bill!
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Old 09-23-2019, 10:41 AM   #24
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Cazenovia, NY
Posts: 108
Year: 1985
Coachwork: Leyland
Chassis: Leyland
Engine: Cummins
Rated Cap: 17500, probably kg
Ceilings and floors will be staying as is. We've got a center aisle design that will let us keep the natural light from the windows. We're all pretty short, and even my tall friends can stand with their legs a bit further apart... Upstairs is for sleeping and sitting. Shouldn't matter that the ceiling is a bit low.

Last weekend got the rest of the upstairs ceiling panels out. Looks like a war zone up there now.

Got rained on and found a few leaks I'll have to track down. Body is aluminum, so no rust. Just a few spots where they has steel wool (for rodents?) And some internal bracing which I'll upload pics of... Can't decide if they're structural.
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Old 09-23-2019, 10:55 AM   #25
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Cazenovia, NY
Posts: 108
Year: 1985
Coachwork: Leyland
Chassis: Leyland
Engine: Cummins
Rated Cap: 17500, probably kg
Bus also had a distinct lean. About 3-4 inches when I drop a measuring tape from one corner... I'll need to figure out some leveling system.
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Old 09-23-2019, 09:31 PM   #26
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 995
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crisfole View Post
Bus also had a distinct lean. About 3-4 inches when I drop a measuring tape from one corner... I'll need to figure out some leveling system.
That should be an interesting project.
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Old 09-25-2019, 12:55 PM   #27
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Cazenovia, NY
Posts: 108
Year: 1985
Coachwork: Leyland
Chassis: Leyland
Engine: Cummins
Rated Cap: 17500, probably kg
Sorry read my previous post and I phrased it wrong:

We have a two aisle design. So furnishings are centered, leaving windows to let in light.
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Old 09-25-2019, 12:57 PM   #28
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Cazenovia, NY
Posts: 108
Year: 1985
Coachwork: Leyland
Chassis: Leyland
Engine: Cummins
Rated Cap: 17500, probably kg
Quote:
Originally Posted by Native View Post
That should be an interesting project.

Hoping to KISS for now. Attaching 4 scissor jacks with a drill on board...
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Old 09-25-2019, 11:54 PM   #29
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 995
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crisfole View Post
Hoping to KISS for now. Attaching 4 scissor jacks with a drill on board...
KISS is always one of my favorite practices.
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Old 09-26-2019, 01:14 AM   #30
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: MO
Posts: 20
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Blue bird
Chassis: All American RE
Engine: 8.3L Cummins 6CTA
Rated Cap: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crisfole View Post
All upstairs seats are removed, including the rear one (which was a pain). The rearmost ceiling panel is also out. No insulation at all in the bus (as in zero).

The tiny rivets holding up the panels and holding up the trim pieces pry off easily enough. The giant ones are terrible...wind up warping the panel terribly just to get it off. Not sure exactly how to remove properly just yet, but I did it by force (bent the sheet back so I could pry it from the rib). Tried drilling out the middle and just broke my bit.

The result:

https://youtu.be/VOd6DAZ2_hE

Any ideas on removing that back seat frame? It's 100% rivets and welds.
Cheap drill bits always break quickly. Spend a few more bucks on higher quality bits and you'll have better luck.
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Old 09-26-2019, 01:36 AM   #31
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Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 143
Year: 2001
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freightliner
Engine: Cummins ISC 260/660
Rated Cap: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnoman View Post
Cheap drill bits always break quickly. Spend a few more bucks on higher quality bits and you'll have better luck.
and they’ll last longer without dulling. I was breaking a ton of bits with my 120 volt plug in drill. When I switched to using the cordless drill I found the drill would usually stop rather than breaking the bit. And if you’re using thinner bits you can turn down the “clutch” to keep them from breaking.
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Old 10-01-2019, 11:11 AM   #32
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Cazenovia, NY
Posts: 108
Year: 1985
Coachwork: Leyland
Chassis: Leyland
Engine: Cummins
Rated Cap: 17500, probably kg
Absence on forum doesn't indicate absence of progress!

Last two weekends have resulted in walls and ceiling upstairs almost completely done and a good start on the floor. There's a bunch of open space on the walls, and then a section that seems double walled... It's all aluminum, though, so really hard to decide if I feel like stripping the last layer, or just pointing a camera into each channel then filling with foam...

The floor is pretty grody. Even some of the aluminum sheeting is rotting through. I'm not super clear whether it's aluminum or not, actually, but it's not iron based: no red. Photos forthcoming when I actually take them...
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Old 10-10-2019, 07:34 PM   #33
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Cazenovia, NY
Posts: 108
Year: 1985
Coachwork: Leyland
Chassis: Leyland
Engine: Cummins
Rated Cap: 17500, probably kg
OK. Upstairs I've got her stripped down pretty heavily. When it rains the ceiling barely leaks any more. (I think there's some drips, but not many, and I'm not done with sealing from the inside). I've taken a bead of automotive seam sealer along every joint on the top. Now I'm working through every joint where the outside aluminum shell meets the inside aluminum framing.

This is what I started with:



And now it's been cleaned, and a bead of seam sealer run over it. It's just NAPA auto brand. But it can be sanded, tooled and painted according to the box. So I'm hoping for the best. Also, I plan on spray foaming, so that should block the rest of the water.

A bigger problem is the condensation: it's pretty bad when it's cold and humid. I've taken to leaving the windows open so there's less temperature difference. The condensation inside the bus is pretty incredible: almost like it's raining. That will be addressed by spray foaming, but wait! There's more!

Problem 1: The windows leak. Pretty badly. They drip around and then the water makes it to the upstairs floor...now that the floor is down to the joists at the edeges, it's really the downstairs ceiling.

Problem 2: below the windows the bus is double walled all the way down to the downstairs windows near as I can tell. Like: aluminum sheeting on the outside, and heavy gauge aluminum sheets on the inside. Check out this video:

I'll swap for the youtube video when it comes up:https://photos.app.goo.gl/ZmxZLGZXKLBqxPhf9

Here's a photo of the exterior of these windows. How do I go about re-sealing these windows!?



Any suggestions on insulating in between the exterior and interior walls? There's a handful of vents and holes cut, but I assume there are structural beams running horizontally too...am I in for a whole lot of aluminum hole cutting!?
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Old 10-10-2019, 07:38 PM   #34
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Cazenovia, NY
Posts: 108
Year: 1985
Coachwork: Leyland
Chassis: Leyland
Engine: Cummins
Rated Cap: 17500, probably kg
Oh! I also got a bit of the floor out from downstairs to see what I've got for space.



Turns out that a bunch of the wheel well area is just wasted uninsulated space separated from the interior of the bus by nothing but plywood. It's going to be fun figuring out how to insulate this baby....
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