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Old 08-25-2018, 03:25 PM   #101
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Nicely done!

I'm about to start this part of the project myself and it helps seeing how others have done it. I was also thinking about doing a "floating floor" like you have.

Any concerns building walls over this floor? Do you anticipate any settling or shifting as the insulation compresses?
So, when I lay out the walls, before I lay the floor, I'm going to put a row of #10 screws under each wall, about 6-8" apart. This should prevent any compression due to the weight of the walls. I haven't decided whether I also need this under the edges of all the cabinets..

All in all, I don't expect any issues, the screws are "just in case"...
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Old 08-25-2018, 03:42 PM   #102
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Originally Posted by synestine View Post
Nicely done!

I'm about to start this part of the project myself and it helps seeing how others have done it. I was also thinking about doing a "floating floor" like you have.

Any concerns building walls over this floor? Do you anticipate any settling or shifting as the insulation compresses?
I think insulation compression is a non issue. Rigid foam has between 15-100PSI compression strength. 15psi over a square foot would exceed a ton (2160). A wall 3.5" wide and 36" long would need more than 1890psi to compress the insulation. These numbers are adding weight directly to the insulation. If you add a plywood subfloor and then a finished floor, compression is compounded to non existent.
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Old 08-25-2018, 04:02 PM   #103
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I have seen mention of placing flooring directly on the foam insulation a number of threads.

When I read the discussion it sounds reasonable but I am reluctant.

I have three residential shower pans (that I can recall) that were constructed of fiberglass or ABS over a foam base. On all of them, the foam compressed under the spot where I stood to shower. I weigh a bit over 140#. I have been as heavy as 190#. I don't think that my weight was the issue.

Is there anyone here that did flooring directly over foam and lived with it for a while?

What has your experience been?
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Old 08-26-2018, 01:59 AM   #104
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Originally Posted by o1marc View Post
I think insulation compression is a non issue. Rigid foam has between 15-100PSI compression strength. 15psi over a square foot would exceed a ton (2160). A wall 3.5" wide and 36" long would need more than 1890psi to compress the insulation. These numbers are adding weight directly to the insulation. If you add a plywood subfloor and then a finished floor, compression is compounded to non existent.
I'm not so sure, especially when time and repetitive motion (primarily shaking) are involved. I understand the numbers and the theory, but I also understand the difference between theory and practice. I plan on using my bus for a very long time, and would like to avoid costly repairs down the road. I'm new to bus building but have enough experience with other projects to understand that there are details you need to get right. I'd hate to have it settle and begins to wobble, possibly breaking pipes and wires.

I mean thanks for your input.
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Old 08-26-2018, 08:17 AM   #105
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As long as the topmost layer is tough (resists punctures) and rigid (spreads loads over the underlying foam) should be no problem for many years.

Design for a bit of compression settling.

But eventually over decades, foam does break down and crumble.
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Old 09-23-2018, 11:06 AM   #106
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Walls



Lots happening here:
- 1" foam glued to the inner metal skin of the bus
- Upper and lower 2x2s screwed to the frame and skin to support the wall panels (1/4" plywood).
- 1/2 x 1-3/4 wood lathing every 16" to glue/nail the wall panels to.
- 2x4 screwed to wall to support dinette table (passenger side, middle)
- Wiring Chanels - routed 3/4 x 1/2" channels in the foam to provide for wiring.
- 120V wiring covered with sheet metal taped in place to prevent errant nail/screw issues.
- Duct embedded in the driver side wall (near back) to support air recirculation / filtering system. This draws air from the bedroom, filters it and sends it to the front of the bus.. or vice versa..

I've got almost all the wiring done now so I can finish the ceiling and then I can build the interior walls for the Shower and the rear wall.

I'm planning on installing the vinyl plank flooring under the cabinets.. mostly to hold it down when traveling.
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