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Old 06-14-2015, 07:21 PM   #21
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 64crew4x4 View Post
One BIG reason for the Coolant lines inside Vehicle....Inside lines stay warmer in winter weather....If it is below freezing outside and the lines of fluid Are travelling 35-50 ft up to the front, they are cool by the time they get to front heat...;) In Bus, that won't happen... just one silly mechanical point of view....lol
Hmmm, I hadn't thought of that, not really planning on running it in freezing cold weather, but a good consideration all the same. I just don't like the idea of having something that could make that big a mess in the living space.
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Old 06-16-2015, 04:39 PM   #22
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If running Rubber hoses up thru cab space, convert to Solids.....;) Easy to plumb into and t off of anyplace you need to run a Heat source Tap....;) I have not looked at mine yet to see if it is already steel or rubber
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Old 06-16-2015, 04:46 PM   #23
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I ran mine underneath because I didn't plan my interior space to have the hoses run inside. If I were to do it again I'd run them inside. Takes less hose, would be easier and puts the heat where you want it.

Unless, of course, you're using your heater loop as radiators #2 and 3 on a summer road trip like I'm doing in a few days. Then run them underneath.
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Old 06-16-2015, 05:07 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by porkchopsandwiches View Post
I ran mine underneath because I didn't plan my interior space to have the hoses run inside. If I were to do it again I'd run them inside. Takes less hose, would be easier and puts the heat where you want it.

Unless, of course, you're using your heater loop as radiators #2 and 3 on a summer road trip like I'm doing in a few days. Then run them underneath.
Hey porkchopsandwiches, that is a good Idea, removing the rear heater and installing it underneath the bus for auxiliary radiator.

J
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Old 06-16-2015, 07:15 PM   #25
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Just replaced mine with new hoses, old ones had a bunch of repairs and I too didn't want them leaking once finished. Front to back (RE).
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Old 06-16-2015, 10:14 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by juliol View Post
Hey porkchopsandwiches, that is a good Idea, removing the rear heater and installing it underneath the bus for auxiliary radiator.

J
I have done that on a few of our rides here on the farm.

The best one is the tree spade truck. It always over heated due to the fan not pushing enough air through the smallish rad while sitting stationary digging a tree, revved up.

So in a pinch I used two of the rear heater units out of my first bus plumbed into the heater lines. Never heated up again.

The hottest place to draw hot coolant from on a 5.9 Cummins is off the back of #6 piston. This is part of what helps the 5.9 cummins engine in buses last as well as they do, compared to the same engine in a dodge truck. Dodge trucks never pulled coolant from #6 piston.

There are also ports for more lines behind the thermostat, coming directly off the engine block on the front of the engine.

Manny rear engine buses have a 12 volt coolant pump plumbed into the heater lines. This ensures that the flow is sufficient to carry the heat needed with all the added restriction of heater cores, long lines, 90% elbows, ect.

The 12 volt pumps can be set to trigger, and start pumping by the same system that starts and stops a electric fan on a automotive radiator.
That same system is what also triggers the fans on the bus heaters.

Nat
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Old 07-26-2015, 01:34 PM   #27
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I was hoping to get the floor treated with Ospho and painted in the next few days, so I could let it dry during August as I am away, but I'm having a surprising amount of trouble finding Ospho at any local stores. I can find it on Amazon, but it's through a third party seller and wouldn't get here for over a week. There are a bunch of other options for rust treatment available at local stores, but from what I've read on the forum Ospho seems to be the one most people think is the best. I want to make sure and do this right, anyone have any alternatives they liked that Home Depot or Lowes would carry?

Also, planning on treating the frame and parts of the engine that are rusting with Ospho, any pros/cons to this?
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Old 07-26-2015, 01:40 PM   #28
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They don't have anything like ospho at my local HD or Lowes. But all the Ace Hardwares and True Value stores have it. Lots of auto supply shops may have it too.
Just look up your local auto paint supply store.
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Old 07-26-2015, 01:49 PM   #29
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I tried True Value and Do It Best, Ace is closed today, I'll try them tomorrow. The guy at the Sherwin Williams store knew what it was and said he could order it in, but it would take a week to get here.
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Old 07-26-2015, 01:52 PM   #30
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I got mine from the local Benjamin Moore paint store, and the local ACE hardware store also has it.

Home Depot sells Corroseal (Corroseal Rust Converter | Metal Primer | Rust Paint) that works very well, but it is $$$.
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