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Old 03-13-2018, 05:47 AM   #71
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Awesome!!!!

I started on the river removal. It's going slow on the rub rail trying to get the rivets out completely without damaging the metal has been a challenge.

I am going to call and check on a rivet removal tool.
Someone on another thread mentioned a rivets shaver. I looked them up and the run between $150 (used) up to about $400. I guess the investment may be worth the time if you have enough rivets to remove. You can always sell it when finished to recoup some of the cost.

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Old 03-13-2018, 08:59 AM   #72
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Very handy tool. Just make sure you get the cutting head for steel...not aluminum.
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Old 03-13-2018, 09:09 AM   #73
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Very handy tool. Just make sure you get the cutting head for steel...not aluminum.
That's the question I have regarding the one from Aircraft Spruce that was recommended.
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Old 03-13-2018, 02:45 PM   #74
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I decided to try grinding the heads off with a flap disc and punching out the body. Some of the bodies are not coming out. I am going to have to figure out how to deal with those. The ones between the windows have not been a problem as I am able to grind on them again after I pull the metal off of the hat chanel between the windows. The ones behind the rub rail are a bit of a problem.
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Old 03-13-2018, 03:18 PM   #75
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Steve,

I've been doing great with the air chisel method. Using the punch to pop the mandrel out, then the chisel to pop the head off, and if necessary using the punch again to pop the rest of the rivet body out.

At least, that's the method for steel rivets. Aluminum ones are easier, I pop the head off with the chisel and use a drill to remove the body.Most of them just pop right out when you touch them but a few were warped enough that spinning the drill bit was necessary.


It's important that you have a sharp edge on the chisel bit with a slight curve on the side that goes against the panel, otherwise you can damage the metal. Also after sharpening with a grinder you really gotta heat temper the chisel again or it will be too soft to be useful.

I've removed a million rivets so far and only have another 3 million to go.
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Old 03-13-2018, 06:11 PM   #76
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Steve,

I've been doing great with the air chisel method. Using the punch to pop the mandrel out, then the chisel to pop the head off, and if necessary using the punch again to pop the rest of the rivet body out.

At least, that's the method for steel rivets. Aluminum ones are easier, I pop the head off with the chisel and use a drill to remove the body.Most of them just pop right out when you touch them but a few were warped enough that spinning the drill bit was necessary.


It's important that you have a sharp edge on the chisel bit with a slight curve on the side that goes against the panel, otherwise you can damage the metal. Also after sharpening with a grinder you really gotta heat temper the chisel again or it will be too soft to be useful.

I've removed a million rivets so far and only have another 3 million to go.
That worked great on the interior. Those were a piece of cake compared to the ones outside. No mandrel and much larger.

I just picked up a new "bullet" drill bit the the guy at the hardware store swears will make short work of them. Gonna give that a try as well.
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Old 03-13-2018, 10:01 PM   #77
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I'm back.
Is this the stuff you want to ask about?







If so... you may be overthinking it.
What I remember -- and it was a dozen years ago -- is that I simply did whatever seemed would work all right, as I went along.

Next time -- and it may be approaching -- I can probably improve on a few things.

One item that can be upgraded... is where to cut all the window posts. It would make more sense to alternate cutting them high and low, for better alignment and better structural integrity. (All in a line... invites failure along that line.)

Other than such basic engineering... remember, we're not building a piano here.
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Old 03-13-2018, 11:14 PM   #78
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I thought I remembered someone saying that (staggering cut lines) a few years ago, but couldn't remember who it was. I tried to remember, every time the subject came up, but just kept my mouth shut. Seems that it would be structurally better.
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Old 03-14-2018, 09:07 AM   #79
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Staggering the cut was recommended to me by a retired Blue Bird engineer who lived down the road in Georgia. He noted that it would avoid creating a "weak line" so that's what I did on my old BBAA.
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Old 03-14-2018, 11:43 AM   #80
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Staggering the cut was recommended to me by a retired Blue Bird engineer who lived down the road in Georgia. He noted that it would avoid creating a "weak line" so that's what I did on my old BBAA.
I'm not buying this. It would create a weak line if you cut the same place all around and then welded that back together. if you are raising it with pieces of metal bent in a "U" and welding each at all 4 ends I think you would find that, even if it were "weaker" it will still hame way more structural integrity than is required. the ribs are welded and then skins riveted to it makes it an extremely solid structure. I would not be concerned at all unless they were just extremely poor welds.
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