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Old 09-22-2015, 08:06 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
My AmTran wiring looks really clean compared to a lot of the pictures I've seen of other buses'. A LOT less of it too. I guess in that regard I got lucky.
So was mine...until I gutted it and got 30 bucks for the copper.
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Old 09-24-2015, 06:55 PM   #62
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Probably I can't foresee them having more than 20 people who wire the busses and they were probably trained by the same group of guys who clearly don't give a rats ass.
Haha yes I couldn't agree more lol. And then to top it off they went crazy on the screws and the bolts for the wheel chair rail. Spent some serious time grinding those suckers out and then prying the bars up and out as you can watch in the video.Also had the wife help me out on removing some more wiring, we are going to tackle the fuse panel in the next couple of weeks. I will have more info on my website as far as the rewiring plans go.

Quick question though, My goal is to make everything accessible as far as the plumbing, electric, and other inner workings are concerned. Should I be worried that the running lights and brake lights will be behind the ceiling and covered with spray foam? Or should I go with making them accessible?

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Old 09-24-2015, 08:31 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by Josiahdr View Post

Quick question though, My goal is to make everything accessible as far as the plumbing, electric, and other inner workings are concerned. Should I be worried that the running lights and brake lights will be behind the ceiling and covered with spray foam? Or should I go with making them accessible?
I'm putting brake light wires and others in a conduit tube.

That way no harm can come to the wire, and others can be pulled in for future upgrades / expansion.

The way I strapped the interior of my bus, running a pipe front to back is simple.
Largest I can run in the wall is 1.5 inch OD.
In my attic I can run 8 inch OD.

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Old 09-25-2015, 02:21 AM   #64
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I'm putting brake light wires and others in a conduit tube.


Nat
Leave a piece of clearly labeled unattached wire in there to fish things through at a later date and time. If and when you do fish new piece of wire through it attach a new dummy wire along with the actively fished wire so you can repeat this process and always have a fishing wire in the conduit. Use at least 3/4" conduit.
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Old 09-25-2015, 12:00 PM   #65
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Leave a piece of clearly labeled unattached wire in there to fish things through at a later date and time. If and when you do fish new piece of wire through it attach a new dummy wire along with the actively fished wire so you can repeat this process and always have a fishing wire in the conduit. Use at least 3/4" conduit.
I leave a twine, but wire works too.

In commercial applications we use twine. No wires are pulled in till the construction is complete.

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Old 09-25-2015, 06:17 PM   #66
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I just use a long scrap piece of wire, usually thermostat wire or a twisted pair from an old ethernet cable as nothing sucks more than your twine snapping I haven't had to deal with t-stat wire snapping ever.
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Old 09-28-2015, 10:18 PM   #67
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Cool thanks for the tips! Going to run some type of conduit to hold the wires as well as run a dummy line for added repairs and expansions as you guys have mentioned. It sounds like a better way to go just in case something goes wrong it will be easier to fix. Better safe than sorry.

Tomorrow we will be heading over to remove the windows and reseal them with automotive seam sealer. I was reading a few posts about it and that seams to be the stuff to go with.



Going to look for a uv resistant one if possible. Any tips on the cheapest place to buy it at or is there a better alternative?
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Old 09-30-2015, 01:16 AM   #68
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Old 09-30-2015, 08:32 AM   #69
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The best seam sealers are the OEM automotive type and usually available at auto paint supply houses or online. They are not cheap but you get what you pay for and to me, sealer is a critical item. One such brand is McKanica. I just had to remove a fender well I had previously sealed up and it was tough going . It may as well have been welded on.

The good stuff is 100% UV proof, waterproof, remains flexible forever and is paintable.
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Old 09-30-2015, 10:47 AM   #70
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I could be wrong, but I think Old Trunt used sikaflex brand.

No clue which one. Here is a bit of discussion on the topic.

Which Sikaflex? | MIG Welding Forum

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