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Old 05-18-2016, 12:13 PM   #1
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Regarding Diesel Fuel Hose...

Howdy All --- I just learned something new. Maybe everyone else is aware of this, but...just in case...

If you need to replace any fuel lines on a diesel engine (supply or return), there are now different types of hose. What with the new-fangled additives and bio-diesel out there, you have to make sure to get the right type or it can break down pretty quickly. As in dissolve, apparently.

They are rated as "regular diesel"...or..."Regular and bio-diesel". And according to one of the chaps at NAPA, some carry ratings for different amounts of bio-diesel with the best hoses being able to handle up to 100% and others only good to 10%. Who knew?

Just one more thing to consider.
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Old 05-18-2016, 03:34 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Tango View Post
Howdy All --- I just learned something new. Maybe everyone else is aware of this, but...just in case...

If you need to replace any fuel lines on a diesel engine (supply or return), there are now different types of hose. What with the new-fangled additives and bio-diesel out there, you have to make sure to get the right type or it can break down pretty quickly. As in dissolve, apparently.

They are rated as "regular diesel"...or..."Regular and bio-diesel". And according to one of the chaps at NAPA, some carry ratings for different amounts of bio-diesel with the best hoses being able to handle up to 100% and others only good to 10%. Who knew?

Just one more thing to consider.
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Old 05-18-2016, 03:40 PM   #3
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Yup and it's important to know which grade of fuel will be available in which part of the country. In the Midwest it's usually less than 5% but on the West coast it can be as high as 20%.

Also, I don't know that many of us are running new enough rigs that they have the new emission after-treatment systems (DEF or blue juice) but higher % biodiesel fuels really tax the system apparently... Which makes you wonder why they bother with it if it doesn't get the same fuel economy and burns dirtier than petroleum diesel fuels.
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Old 05-18-2016, 04:26 PM   #4
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The new low sulfur and biodiesel mixes are hard on fuel systems made for the old stuff. I just had to rebuild the fuel filter canister on my 7.3L Powerstroke because of a nasty fuel leak caused by the new fuel eating a few O rings.
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Old 05-18-2016, 06:27 PM   #5
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I recently replaced 5 O-rings and 4 sealing washers in the fuel system. Something, maybe 15 years use, made them leak.
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Old 05-24-2016, 10:39 PM   #6
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The new low sulfur and biodiesel mixes are hard on fuel systems made for the old stuff. I just had to rebuild the fuel filter canister on my 7.3L Powerstroke because of a nasty fuel leak caused by the new fuel eating a few O rings.
Is there an additive one can purchase to help "neutralize" that problem and make it like good ol #2 diesel?
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Old 05-24-2016, 10:56 PM   #7
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interesting as I had recently a small fuel leak on the suction side of my fuel system causing my fuel pump to lose its prime.. ended up being one of those copper washers needed re-seated...

so the newer fuels can damage even the copper washers? I figured eventually id have to replace hoses but didnt realize it damages the copper washers too..

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Old 05-24-2016, 11:18 PM   #8
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That's spooky if it's eating copper. I also expect to have to replace the hoses. This is basically the same thing as how gas eats the rubber in older vehicles fuel systems.
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Old 05-24-2016, 11:22 PM   #9
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That's spooky if it's eating copper. I also expect to have to replace the hoses. This is basically the same thing as how gas eats the rubber in older vehicles fuel systems.
yeah the ethanol in gasolines will eat up and dry out fuel lines that werent designed for it... people pumping E85 into anon flex-fuel car will make a mess of things..

I dont know that todays diesel is eating copper.. I just saw mention of someone having to replace fuel washers.. and here I had a copper washer leak.... so I just kind of assumed.. esp since my bus is 25 years old..

-Christopher
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:57 AM   #10
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Is there an additive one can purchase to help "neutralize" that problem and make it like good ol #2 diesel?
There's no additive that I've heard of, but, particularly for the 7.3L there are new o-ring kits that aren't effected by the new fuels. I'd never heard of ULSD damaging copper but a search turned up this article which says that it does attack copper and zinc.

http://www.argoturbo.com/pdfs/Haynes...l%202-3-12.pdf
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